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Old August 5th, 2009, 02:44 PM   #93 (permalink)
DisappearingSun412
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Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 30
As a studio and live engineer, let me put OFFICIAL responses into this thread.

As far as autotune, is it a method to mask a voice? To make it sound way better than actuality? Does it completely destroy the vocal dynamic to crate perfection?

The answer here is no. What it does is take the vocal pattern and nudge it a few cents (1/1200th of a whole step) closer toward the base tone they were going for.

The kicker here is that it can be used to completely mask a voice. This, however, is EXTREMELY time intensive and ungoldy expensive. IE: Britney Spears, and the worst offender Paris Hilton. They spend millions on pitch correction procedure. It takes hours per song, and engineers are charging by the hour.

A side note, Autotune is a brand of voice modulator, and the most commonly used and famous one is actually called Melodyne Uno/Studio.


Now we get to the issue of triggering. There are two methods of triggers, replacement sampling, and overenhancement. I'll give you some examples.

In the studio, sometimes they will get some master clips of a bass drum, then they will slave those samples to a trigger controller. This smooths out the post production process. Drummers are inconsistent, which shows there human, not that they suck. It's very heard to master drums when they have minor inconsistencies. Tim Yeung from Divine Heresy uses this method. They cut master samples to tape, load the tape into digital, then trigger the samples

The live application can mimic the studio method, BUT it is more commonly used to compliment the mics on the kick. It sounds complicated but it isn't.

Bass tones and sub are important, but can overpower the ears at a show, so the most common use of triggers live is to provide the click, snap, and bite on each hit, and then a microphone is used to catch the natural tone. The click is the sound created by the batter hitting the drum head. They then blend these together at the mixing board. Why? Because the natural tones in a live setting are very intense on the low end, and you can't hear the speed or pattern without the emphasized clicks and snaps in the high range.

Triggering is not ALWAYS cheating. Hardly ever, except for deathcore and all that faggoty shit.

Autotune is just like putting sprinkles on a cake that already had a lot of icing. The talent and emotion was there, your just adding another piece of appeal.
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