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Old November 5th, 2005, 03:43 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Give me some more fuckin´ heavy metal!!!
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Old November 8th, 2005, 05:29 AM   #27 (permalink)
aleta
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i'd love to do an interview with them when they come to Croatia!
and not just an interview!!! hehe!
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Old November 8th, 2005, 02:24 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Will someone PLEASE post that infamous Guitar World interview...?
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Old November 8th, 2005, 09:46 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Old November 12th, 2005, 01:24 AM   #30 (permalink)
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Interview from Rumba, it's in finnish. I'll see if I have time to translate it.
http://virtual23.nebula.fi/~rumbafi/...0051007_16.pdf
http://virtual23.nebula.fi/~rumbafi/...0051007_17.pdf
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Old November 12th, 2005, 02:31 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Lanterns
Will someone PLEASE post that infamous Guitar World interview...?
The infamous Guitar World interview as requested, all 2,837 words of it:

Child’s Play
He makes the impossible look easy, but Children of Bodom’s young shredder Alexi Laiho has paid his dues in full. And then some.

written by Brian Stillman

For a moment in 1998, it looked as if Children of Bodom’s ship might sink just as it arrived in port. One year earlier, the Finnish band had released its debut record, Something Wild, on Europe’s Spinefarm Records, and its follow-up tour of the continent had been successful. The group had good reason to feel optimistic about its future. But 19-year-old frontman Alexi Laiho wasn’t happy and hadn’t been for some time. A psychiatrist might have told him he was suffering from depression, but Laiho hadn’t sought a professional opinion. Instead, he treated his condition with alcohol and drugs and, in short order, began spiraling out of control. It was around Christmas that his problems came to a head.
Laiho decided that he’d had enough of life and was ready to die. Downing 30 tranquilizers, he knocked back a few shots of whisky and slipped into unconsciousness.
“A friend found me on the floor and brought me to the hospital. I wasn’t in a good place,” he explains in what is a masterpiece of understatement. As Laiho discovered, his depression stemmed from an incident in his youth. At the age of 16, he’d gotten into a brawl with some hometown goons and found himself fighting [the text stops here; I take it to mean the time when some older kids were supposedly stalking him and nearly killed him once]
“I was just feeling worse and worse,” says the 25-year-old guitarist. “Finally, a couple of years after the pills, I had a complete mental breakdown and ended up in a hospital for a week. It was my third time. It was the worst I’d ever felt in my life. That’s when I decided I’d be damned if I ever felt that way again. I just made a decision to get better.”
Foregoing medication and therapy, Laiho pulled his life together by embracing his love of music. Since then, his career, and that of his band mates—drummer Jaska W. Raatikainen, guitarist Roope Latvala, bassist Henkka T. Blacksmith, and keyboardist Janne Warman—has grown dramatically. The year after Laiho’s suicide attempt, the group released its sophomore effort, Hatebreeder. Next came Follow the Reaper, a masterful blend of brutal death and black metal and highly melodic, synth- and lead guitar-driven prog rock. The extreme music scene had never heard anything like it, and wouldn’t again until the band dropped its follow up, Hate Crew Deathroll. On it, the band continued to experiment with its sound, forging an even heavier metal hammer. The album hit number one on the Finnish music charts—higher even than Britney Spears—and Children of Bodom became superstars in Europe, playing stadiums and appearing on TV. Their most recent release, an EP called Trashed, Lost, and Strung Out (Century Media), has brought them even greater accolades.
Most astonishing to Laiho, though, is that he has emerged as a guitar hero. Thanks to his virtuosic chops and keen awareness of the power of onstage presence, Laiho has become an inspiration to other guitarists who want to excel at playing. He belongs to a new breed of metal guitarists who believe solos are cool, and sucking at your instrument just sucks.
“The whole guitar hero thing, where everyone played fast and had great technique, was back in the Eighties,” says Laiho. “And it died out when grunge came in. Then we had nu-metal, and those bands didn’t have guitar solos; I don’t think half of their guitarists knew how to play in the first place. But when I was learning to play, players like Steve Vai and Joe Satriani and Zakk Wylde were leading the way. They were my influences.”
Perhaps now, Laiho concludes, the wheel has turned full circle. “Kids come up to me and say, ‘It’s cool to hear solos and stuff. You don’t hear that anywhere anymore.’ I think people missed it, even if they didn’t know they did.”
It’s a sweet reward for a group that was initially dismissed within its local scene for having too much melody, too many leads, and shockingly high production values. When Children of Bodom formed in the mid-Nineties, black metal bands wanted to play as loud and as fast as possible and wore their albums’ shitty productions as badges of pride. “It’s like there was this black metal book with all of these incredibly stupid rules in it,” says Laiho. “You couldn’t play solos; you couldn’t be good at you instruments . . . not that good, anyway. And people would want their records to sound like shit. We figured, Fuck that. We’re going to do what we want.”
After all, Laiho had set an incredibly high goal for himself even before he’d begun playing guitar. “I was 10 years old and watching MTV when the video for Steve Vai’s ‘For the Love of God’ from the Passion and Warfare album came on. That made me say, ‘Fuck, I have to buy a guitar.’ Everything he did was so cool. The way he sounded, the way he looked, the stuff he did with the instrument—it was just crazy. I knew it was what I had to do.”
Laiho had been playing violin since he was five. his earliest musical recollections involve listening to classical music—“which is why I wanted to play violin,” he says—and his parents have told him he was singing before he knew how to talk. “It’s a little weird, I know,” he acknowledges.
Most parents would shudder at the idea of their child switching from the entirely respectable violin to its louder, nastier distant cousin, but Laiho’s parents encouraged his interest. Not only did they buy him his first guitar and amp—a Strat knockoff and a 60-watt Marshall combo—but also wrote notes excusing the budding guitarist from school for feigned illnesses, so he could practice. By his early teens, Laiho was dividing his time between woodshed sessions in his bedroom—surrounded by no less than five Steve Vai posters—and skateboarding with his friends. “Something had to be sacrificed; for me it was school,” he says. “I didn’t care. I didn’t have any interest in what my teachers were telling me, and my mom knew I wasn’t going to graduate high school anyway. She helped me succeed in the thing that interested me.”
Even before he started cutting classes to shred in his bedroom, Laiho had begun taking guitar lessons at a local music school. For five years, he learned Jazz and Classical technique, as well as proper picking. “All the crap that no kid ever wants to learn!” he says with a laugh. “No one was there to teach me sweep arpeggios and stuff like that. So I’d buy instructional videos and learn from them. I taught myself a lot of the metal technique.”
As a result, he says, “sometimes I do things wrong; I’m just banging the shit out of the guitar. But who cares, as long as it sounds cool. The key is to find the balance between technique and attitude, and that’s something they don’t teach you in school. You can’t play like John Petrucci and play in an extreme metal band. It just doesn’t work.”
Laiho knew from the outset that he wanted to form a band. When he received his first guitar, he brought it to school every day. There was a drum kit in his classroom, and he’d frequently enlist a friend to smash away on the skins while he jammed along. “I didn’t know how to play at all,” he says. “I just made up chords. I loved the noise of it all.” A few years later, drummer Jaska Raatikainen began attending his school. By then, Laiho had started to figure out his instrument. “That’s really where Children of Bodom began,” he says. “The original lineup grew around that. By the time we were in high school, we were really beginning to make it work.”
Unfortunately, it was then that Nirvana became the biggest band on the planet. Laiho recalls the difficulty of performing in a group that unabashedly embraced guitar virtuosity. “All the hair metal was gone. I remember when the change happened, too. I was watching Headbanger’s Ball in the early Nineties and thinking to myself, Why is everyone looking so fucking stupid these days? The musicians were dressing in flannel shirts and their hair was all messed up. They looked like shit.”
Nonetheless, the band, which initially went by the name In Earth, began circulating demo tapes and playing local clubs. Resistance from club owners gradually softened as bands like Dimmu Borgir and Cradle of Filth began to change the musical landscape with their intricate guitar lines and orchestral keyboard parts. although Children of Bodom pushed the envelope further than Dimmu and Cradle, more clubs were willing to give them a chance. Eventually, word began to spread about the cool new group from Finland.
As it happened, one of the band’s demos ended up at a now-defunct indie label in Belgium. Considering the musical climate of the times, Laiho had no expectations that a record contract was in his group’s immediate future. So, when the Belgians offered to put out a Children of Bodom record, he jumped at the opportunity. “It was the shittiest contract ever. We had to pay to record the album. Then we had to buy 1,000 copies to sell ourselves. It was ridiculous, but we didn’t think we’d get anything better.”
On a whim, Laiho passed a copy of the band’s tape to an employee at Spinefarm Records, one of Europe’s more active extreme metal labels. To everyone’s surprise the exec loved it and offered to sign the group. ”Unfortunately, we already had the contract with the Belgians,” says Laiho. “But it sucked so bad. So we told them that we broke up and couldn’t deliver the record. Then we came up with a new name and signed to Spinefarm.”
The name Laiho and his band mates selected couldn’t have been more chilling to their fellow citizens. Children of Bodom is a reference to a triple murder that took place in 1960 near Lake Bodom in Espoo, Finland. Four teens went camping; three died, one made it out alive. The killer got away and for years the police failed to solve the crime.
“We were trying to find something cool to call ourselves and we came across this story,” explains Laiho. “’Bodom’ sounded pretty metal, so we combined it with every word we could think of. ‘Children of Bodom’ sounded the best.”
“The crazy thing is that, thanks to new DNA evidence, the police think they’ve solved the crime. They say the kid that survived killed his friends. I’m not sure I believe it.”
Once signed to Spinefarm, Children of Bodom quickly saw their fortunes change. After releasing Something Wild, Spinefarm (which still releases the band’s records in Europe) sent the group on its first major tour with Hypocrisy and Covenant. Having never played outside Finland, Children of Bodom were pleasantly surprised at the enthusiastic reception they received. In fact, the further they drifted from Scandinavia, the less often they heard grumbles about their stylistic flourishes. “People’s tastes were much more open, says Laiho. “They were bringing their own influences to the mix.”
The tour brought them other rewards in addition to fans. “We’d never been anywhere with free booze before,” says Laiho, laughing. “That was great! We were riding on the bus with the other bands—it was a huge bus—and just having a great time. They accepted us very quickly once they could see that we knew how to play and knew how to party.”
Children of Bodom finally made it to the United States in 2000, just after the release of Hatebreeder, to play the famed Milwaukee Metalfest. Although the event failed to impress the band members, the audience’s reception overwhelmed them. “We thought there’d be three dudes out there when we played, and after a few minutes even they’d walk out,” Laiho says. “But when we took the stage, the whole house was packed. I didn’t know what to think.”
The band returned to the States the following year to showcase at the South by Southwest music conference in Austin, Texas, and, despite having to overcome some technical glitches involving a dearth of 220-volt adapters for their equipment, blew away the jaded industry crowd. “That’s when we realized we could tour here,” says the guitarist. “Our records were starting to sell well and we had the confidence. That’s all it took, really. Since then, it’s just been a whirlwind.”
Laiho says he’s always liked rock and roll characters, “crazy dudes who are entertaining to watch,” he says. “I probably wouldn’t want to work with them, but I love watching them, because they’re nuts. Like Axl Rose. He’s the stereotype of the crazy rock star. I think it’s kind of sad that the whole rock star thing is missing today. No one drinks, trashes hotel rooms, or fucks groupies in the tour bus. It’s all about being a vegetarian and doing yoga and shit like that.”
So how does Laiho’s rock star lifestyle stack up? Any drinking?
“Oh yeah,” he says with enthusiasm. “I think we’ve got that covered.”
Trashed hotel rooms? “Without a doubt. We wrecked one in Greece that cost us 2,000 euros in damages. You pay for it, man, but it’s worth every cent.”
Any groupies on the tour bus? “Yeah . . .”
Lots of them? “Yeah . . .”
Does he keep photographic evidence like Gene Simmons does? “No!” he shouts, then laughs. “I guess I’ve still got a way to go before I get the whole thing right.”
None of this is meant to undercut Laiho’s dedication to guitar; he typically spends his days off in the rehearsal studio, pushing his technique as far as it can go. But as much as his chops are a reflection of the heroes he grew up with, so is his hard-partying lifestyle. You can’t develop on a steady diet of Guns N’ Roses, Ozzy Osbourne, and Mötley Crüe and not indulge in the many distractions of road life. Simply put, true guitar heroes know that playing well isn’t enough.
“There are lots of guitar players out there who play super fast and super well, but they’re also super lame. Like Dream Theater,” he says, referring once again to his favorite whipping boys. “It’s not even music; it’s sports. And then there are the guys who concentrate on all the little details and never fuck up one note when they play live. You know what? That’s not cool! If you’re going crazy onstage and you miss a note or two, who gives a shit? It just shows you were really into it.
“Though I suppose that pretending to be a rock star and not being able to play at all is even worse.”
It’s a problem Laiho doesn’t need to worry about. In fact, life looks trouble-free for the young guitarist right now. Metal has returned to prominence, and kids too young to know who Vai and Van Halen are—forget about Hendrix or Page—now look to Laiho’s generation of guitar players for inspiration. Hell, he even has a column in this very magazine. “I know,” he says in disbelief. “It’s totally fucking insane. I don’t see myself as a guitar hero. But it’s flattering if people dig the way I play. It’s nice to know all the hard work wasn’t for nothing.”
For all his success, Laiho is still the kid woodshedding in his room, watching MTV, and dreaming about his idols. It still drives him to perfect his craft and keeps the young star grounded. “A lot of people say that after you’re 15 you don’t have idols anymore,” he says. “But I actually do, and I don’t want to lose them.” Even as he becomes one himself.

Alexi’s Essential Virtuoso Albums
1. Steve Vai Passion and Warfare
“This is what got me started. There’s still stuff in there that no one else will ever be able to do.”
2. Ozzy Osbourne Tribute
“I love it better than either of the first two albums. It’s live and honest. You can hear that Randy Rhoads is doing the rhythm guitars and the fills at the same time.”
3. Pantera Vulgar Display of Power
“It changed how metal guitar players were playing. People wanted the Dimebag Darrell sound.”
4. Racer X Live Extreme, Volume 1
“That live album was amazing. They were doing all these crazy double-riff things that still blow me away.”
5. Black Label Society The Blessed Hellride
”The solos are great. Zakk’s picking and using his fingers as well, which is something I’m not as good at. I’d like to learn to do that better.”
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Old November 12th, 2005, 05:14 AM   #32 (permalink)
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Thanks a lot Nicola.
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Last edited by Lanterns : November 12th, 2005 at 06:38 PM.
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Old November 12th, 2005, 05:55 AM   #33 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Light
Interview from Rumba, it's in finnish. I'll see if I have time to translate it.
http://virtual23.nebula.fi/~rumbafi/...0051007_16.pdf
http://virtual23.nebula.fi/~rumbafi/...0051007_17.pdf
Now I translated it. Enjoy.

The seven metal truths

Alexi Laiho, the frontman of Children of Bodom, told us some serious facts about heavy music. After this you'll know what is "heavy metal".

[This first paragraph is about a tv-show that told about how satanic and evil heavy metal is and blablabla...didn't see the point of translating it.]


1. Heavy metallers drink a lot of booze

This is supported by the fact that when I met the singer-guitarist of Children of Bodom on saturday 18 o'clock, he says he has hangover. And second, on the bands recent dvd a pretty alcohol-filled adventure was made to the lake Bodom and "Ruistopuisto", among many other places. And third, Alexi Laiho has with Klamydias Vesa "Vesku" Jokinen and To/Die/Fors (among others) Tonmi Lillman a band named Kylähullut, that makes records drunk. And fourth, Alexi later reveals that his drivers licence got suspended because of driving drunk, when he was still "young and stupid".

You hurt your hand in the beginning of the year. Was this alcohol-related?
"It was a basic drunken accident. I happened to fall from the roof of a car", Alexi Laiho laughs - and takes a sip of beer.
"It could have been worse. It was pretty depressive with a broken hand, a black eye and the stitches and all that. I don't give a shit about some black eye, but the hand was a worse thing."
How did the record label react when you should have been going to the studio but the artist has a cast in his hand?
"Actually there was one guy from Spinefarm with me when it happened. Our management was like 'do you always have to fuck around'. Of course, they didn't mean it rude. Then I got pretty anxious myself when others started to say that we should be in the studio and we don't have any songs. I was like shut up, you'll get the songs. I knew that the songs would come eventually, but of course they were worried", Laiho says - and takes another sip of his drink.
"On the other hand we were lucky, because we had just finished our two years of touring and we didn't have to cancell any gigs. And it was a kind of kick in the ass, that when I got better and we started to practise new songs, everything else was left second. We just concentrated on playing and practising."

2. Heavy metal demands playing skills

Alexi Laiho is supposedly a talented player. At least he's made to the cover of Guitar World with internationally known pros Steve Vai and Zakk Wylde. He also has the approval of Klaus Järvinen, since he's been studying in Oulunkyläs Pop/Jazz conservatory.

"I started to take violin lessons when I was 7. I played in an orchestra and also went to the theory lessons. Then I started to take guitar lessons and got to go to Ogel. Janne (Wirman, the keyboardist) has also been to Ogel. Roope (Latvala, the second guitarist) has taken some classical guitar lessons and I think he was in the Sibelius high school. Jaska (Raatikainen, the drummer) has also taken some classical lessons.
"Practising is still fun. I can still be at home playing for hours. It's not like I had to, but I enjoy it enormously. In the beginning of the year I didn't play for 7 weeks, when I broke my hand. It was the longest break since the day I got my first guitar. You can imagine what burning feeling develops when you want to play, but you can't. I tried to practise something with my left hand, even though I had a cast on my right hand. I got so pissed and destressed when I couldn't play."
What if your hand would have gotten in a condition that you couldn't play guitar anymore?
"I don't even want to think what would happen if I could't play. Nothing good anyway. It was never said that I couldn't ever play anymore, but I could have lasted for months. Three bones were smashed. I had to go to the x-rays and magnet pictures and and all kinds of things to know if it required surgery. But if I could'n play.. I can't think of anything else I could do."

3. Heavy metal is aggressive
Children of Bodom have taken their name from a violent crime of a rare level of obscenity. On the bands new album (that's named Are you dead yet?) are also many songs about violence, like Punch me I bleed.

"The aggression in our music comes from real feelings. Sometimes it's shaped as black humor, that reflects what kind of guys we are. Everybody have those feelings sometimes. I won't believe it for a second if someone says that one's never pissed or angry."
"I can lose my nerve very quickly, but it also passes quickly. If I get stuck in a traffic or play Playstation, I can get a horribly ill temper, but it soon passes. I believe that those people who never lose their nerve become serial killers. If you always keep everything inside and don't let anything out, eventually it explodes. I don't think you need to hide it if you're pissed about something."
Have you ever hit or been hit?
"I have hit and been hit."
With or without a reason?
"You mean hit or been hit? I have never hit anyone without a reason, but I have been hit without a reason many times. Someone walks towards me in the street and doesn't like the way I look and I have gotten into a fight. The last time was when I was year and a half ago in some bar in Eastern Helsinki. One of my friends was working there and I was totally hammered. I waited for her to get out of work, but then I of course passed out sitting at some table. Then some random guy grabbs my hair and calls me a fucking junkie faggot. You don't just do that. I had a reflex that now this guy's getting it. But I'm not violent at all. I never start fights, I think they suck."

4. Heavy metal men are homophobic

The world of heavy metal is very manly. Guitars and fists are often raised like erected in the air and upper bodies are revealed to thousands of people without a shame. That's why some heavy metallers might have a need to prove to surely be interested in women. With some people this might lead to real homophobia.

"At some time there was a rumour going on that I and Janne are a gay couple. Everything started I think when we had a gig in Kanada. I and Janne were totally drunk and then we kissed just for humor. There was some guy who obviously was very homophobic because he went to the Internet whining 'oh hell, I have listened to CoB but I'll never do it again for sure' 'they're gay? oh god, I can't listen to them anymore!' Then more people got into it and in the end it grew so big that some people started to defend this relationship of me and Janne. Like 'hey, if they're fags so what, it's not that bad'. We were like fuck no. Hello, heh heh."

5. Heavy metal diggers are loyal

This doesn't mean relations between couples but between the artist and the fans. Alexi Laiho thinks this is true.

"At some time I wanted to buy a Gimmel-shirt, but you couldn't find them anywhere. I don't know if they even exist. Diggers of that kind of music are not even near as devoted as the heavy metal diggers, who buy and collect all stuff, shirts and other shit that bands do. It's so much easier to find a Stratovarius-lawn-mower than a Hanna Pakarinen -fanshirt."
"To the devotion also relates taking the band serious. I remember when I was a kid myself, if you digged some band and some other ones mocked it, it was like a defamation. You had to defend your favorite band till the end."

6. Even the worst heavy metal is the best

According to an obviously humorous anecdote heavy music is like pornography: even in its worst it is the best. Alexi Laihos memories support this anecdote.

"When I as a kid digged Metallica, Anthrax and Stone, I still secretly digged some Poison, but you couldn't say it out loud. Nowadays there aren't that kind of limitations. I still like the same stuff as a kid. It's still nice to listen to Poison and drink beer."
"I grew up with bands like Twisted Sister, W.A.S.P. and Mötley Crüe. I think the idea comes from there that if you're in a band you have makeup and these things (shakes his bracelets). Maybe that look isn't that common in death metal bands, but to me it has come pretty automatically."
To heavy metal being the best is usually also related the visuality of it. For example Skatalites from Jamaika didn't have a Plymouth Fury car on the stage in last summers Ilosaarirock Festival. Children of Bodom did.
"We wanted to get a little ghetto and slum feeling into it. The pyrotechnics also went from the fact that all the fire streams wouldn't suit us so we have these oil barrels, that people warm up next to in some slumms. The trashed car fit into this. If some car freak happens to be reading this I tell you that the car wasn't violated, it was a wreck from the beginning. I myself dig American cars so I wouldn't have demolished it. We just sawed the wreck in half so it would be easier to transport. And the car of course has to be cruel-looking. If you drag a Ford Fiesta on the stage, it wouldn't work."

7. Heavy metal is childrens music

This sentence has been heard many times from the known singer-guitarist Jouni Kalervo Hynynen from Kotiteollisuus.

"I don't think it's childrens music. Or well, it is childrens music too. It's easy to say that heavy metal is stupid and if you look at it the right way, it is. All the macho bullshit and boasting, it's stupid in all formats... but it's still cool!"
"For example, let's think which one is more childrens music, heavy metal or Britney Spears. There are 50-year-old guys that dig Purple and Sabbath, but you can't find a 50-year-old lady who digs Britney Spears. These MTV stars are much more childrens music."
How about the lyrics?
"You can always find something stupid about the lyrics, no matter what genre. I think it's cooler to have something stupid over the top -things than just something boring. If you compare anything that comes from MTV to some Mötley Crüe lyrics, it's just so boring that you ignore it. Is it so much smarter to sing about some stupid love stories in every song", Alexi Laiho asks.
I leave this without an answer.
"In some places people give lots of respect to bands that have political lyrics. I don't give a shit about their attitude or what they take a stand on, but if it's good music I can dig it. For example I dig a lot of System of a Down, even though they have political perspectives. Still I can't understand why someone does it. I'll quote Alice Cooper, who said pretty well in one interview, that all shit that happens in this world in all over the papers and television. Rock music should be a getaway to somewhere else, when you're in a gig or listening to a record, you can forget everything else."
"The first time when I was in subway in Tokyo, I saw some guys in suits lying and sleeping on the seats. It was so absurd. It's like they had passed out in there, but they work 14 hours a day at the office and then ride a few times back and fourth in the subway to get some sleep, because there's no sense going at home. The same guys come to our gigs straight from work wearing suits. For that 90 minutes they can act like they never can anywhere else. They come to shout and mess around. If you can give a moment like that for people to forget everything else, I wouldn't start to babble about politics or about what wrong did George Bush say this time."
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Old November 12th, 2005, 06:57 AM   #34 (permalink)
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Really nice interviews
Thanks both of you.
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Old November 12th, 2005, 08:15 AM   #35 (permalink)
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thanks!
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Old November 12th, 2005, 05:04 PM   #36 (permalink)
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The jap comments are soo true, japs are true. Interesting whe have no japs on the forum, they probably think whe all retarded, and i agree.
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Old November 12th, 2005, 10:06 PM   #37 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Lanterns
Thanks a lot Nicola.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fatalized
Really nice interviews
Thanks both of you.
You're Welcome.
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Old November 14th, 2005, 04:01 AM   #38 (permalink)
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In the lates Sweden Rock Magazine, there were an interwiew (3-4 pages if I remember right, but It was many photos also) with the band at lake Bodom.
But, stupid me, forgot the magazine at the pub when we were out partying two weeks ago! But I will buy a new one this week. I will translate the interwiew as good as I can for you then! Should be here by friday latest.
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Old November 14th, 2005, 04:06 AM   #39 (permalink)
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@Excess: Alright, looking forward to it!
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Old November 14th, 2005, 12:03 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Excess
In the lates Sweden Rock Magazine, there were an interwiew (3-4 pages if I remember right, but It was many photos also) with the band at lake Bodom.
But, stupid me, forgot the magazine at the pub when we were out partying two weeks ago! But I will buy a new one this week. I will translate the interwiew as good as I can for you then! Should be here by friday latest.
I've already begun translating that article so you don't need to do it (unless you'd like to run a competition of 'who's the fastest translator?') No, but serioulsy, I've only got one test this week so I think I can get it done till the weekend. It depends on how picky I am with getting everything grammatically correct. (The journalists in these magazines allways seem to love playing with words, making it sound a little odd even in swedish...)

But hey, Excess, if you happen to own a scanner maybe you can scan the pictures because mine is totally fucked up right now.
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Old November 15th, 2005, 04:00 AM   #41 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Fatalized
I've already begun translating that article so you don't need to do it (unless you'd like to run a competition of 'who's the fastest translator?') No, but serioulsy, I've only got one test this week so I think I can get it done till the weekend. It depends on how picky I am with getting everything grammatically correct. (The journalists in these magazines allways seem to love playing with words, making it sound a little odd even in swedish...)

But hey, Excess, if you happen to own a scanner maybe you can scan the pictures because mine is totally fucked up right now.
OK, thanks, that sounds way easier. I have pretty much this week so. Hey, feels stupid to write in english when we both know swedish. But what the hell, for the sake of the others, I will
Had a scanner at my parents house, and the last time I was there we could'nt get it to start up. Don't think someone's tried ever since either so, no, sorry. Maybe we have one at school, but I am not sure of that either.
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Old November 17th, 2005, 06:04 AM   #42 (permalink)
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If anybody need the interveiw they transated gramatically edited, I'd be very glad to help out... If you're going to post I'll be reading it anyway so for sure it wouldn't hurt to correct a few mistakes on the way if any of course
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Old November 17th, 2005, 06:21 AM   #43 (permalink)
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im still waiting for somebody to translate the alexi omg laiho documentary video
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Old November 22nd, 2005, 08:00 AM   #44 (permalink)
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im still waiting for somebody to translate the alexi omg laiho documentary video
Yeah me too, i have and there are some nice guitar parts and shit, but i would like to know what the fuck he's saying
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Old November 24th, 2005, 02:45 AM   #45 (permalink)
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Ok, I'll translate the documentary. I'll try to get the text online this week.
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Old November 24th, 2005, 07:16 AM   #46 (permalink)
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Wonder where Fatalized have gone. Thought he would've posted that interview from SRM last week.
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Old November 24th, 2005, 10:33 AM   #47 (permalink)
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Here's the Alexi omg Laiho documentary.

Six string masters: Alexi Laiho

Text:
Alexi Laiho *8.4.1979 Espoo
The first influences: Bands: Wasp, Twisted Sister, Poison and glamrock of all kinds. Steve Vai got me to play guitar.
The gear at this moment: 3 Jackson RR Custom guitars and the rest is just plain professionalism.
Other instuments you play: Drums and bass, but guitar is my instrument!
Should we be expecting some changes in your music style?

Conversation:
Alexi: At least not at the moment. I mean, I have played a lot of different music styles, because I for example went to Ogel, where we had to play jazz and Bossanova and some other fun stuff, but it still wasn't my thing. I don't know what I will be doing in 10 years or will I be doing anything, we'll have to wait and see. But at this moment anyway I have music in my heart and it's what I want to do. And if I can do that for living, it's just perfect.
Interviewer: Where does the nickname Wildchild come from?
Alexi: Well, that comes from aspects outside of music.

Text:
Before starting to play guitar, Alexi played violin as a kid for 5 years and also learned some secrets of piano. Anyway, Wasp and co. blew him away...

Conversation:
Interviewer: Do you have a life outside of music at all? Is there something completely different that you do or that's important to you?
Alexi: Not really. Everything that I'm doing all the time has something to do with music. I don't do and don't even want to do anything else, I'm not even interested in anything else that much. And there's the thing that I have three bands and of course for Bodom I write all the music and it's the most important thing to me. Like if some things don't work between the bands, Bodom goes first.

Text:
The most important project: Children of Bodom
The album that represents your playing the best: Probably the new Sinergy album

Conversation:
Interviewer: Do you consider yourself more as a songwriter or a guitar player?
Alexi: Probably as a guitar player but also as a songwriter, because that's what I do, like for Bodom I write all stuff and some for other bands. I would still prefer if people considered me as a guitar player than some guy with a quill. I'm not a composer anyway. After the last summer I have been practising more than ever before and I have sometimes thought that hell, I wouldn't have been able to play that thing a year ago. If I compare my playing now to our first album, it has nothing to do with what I played on it anymore. And I wasn't able to play the solos that I can now.

Text:
The greatest gig of your own: One of the two gigs in Tokyo
Goal as a guitarist: Learn how to play and a competition between me and Jimi Pääkallo.
And a little more officially...

Conversation:
Alexi: To improve my playing all the time, like picking technique and of course to keep everything as clean as possible. Like I know my limits and I know how fast I am able to play, I don't try to do anything I know I can't do, because there's no point in that. For example if there's a guitarist who has ideas but the technique isn't that good, I think it's a pretty traditional situation. For myself too, when I had played for a few years I tried to play everything as fast as possible and it sounded.. well, let's say like shit. At the time I didn't realize that if I had played more slowly and the things I could play, it would have sounded much better. But it's a phaise you have to go through.

Text:
The Finlands best guitarist of all times and still: Roope Latvala
The worlds best guitarist of all times and still: Steve Vai
And what would happen if Alexi had to stop playing?

Conversation:
Alexi: Suicide.
Interviewer: Outch, reasons?
Alexi: I just couldn't live without music and playing, it's the truth. If I would hurt my hands or something, even if I got tons of money, I couldn't live, because well, I don't know. It's just the thing I want to do, I don't want to do anything else. I can't think of anything that I'd want to do as much, there's really no other choice than suicide.

Text:
How lonely hobby has the guitar playing become?

Conversation:
Alexi: I wouldn't call myself a hermit, but of course if you have the passion for playing you have to give up certain things. You have to practise a lot and during the years you learn to really know your guitar. I think it's true that there forms a personal relationship between you and the guitar. Like sometimes when I feel that everything goes wrong in life, at least my guitar will never hurt me. I have slept with my guitar many times, stroked it under the covers.

Text:
"Members of the family": King James (the oldest that keeps others in order), Striper (a difficult one with schizophrenia) and at the moment unnamed and the newest guitar, that obviously reminds about the owner.
So what has Alexi had to give up because of the guitar?


Conversation:
Alexi: There are pretty much sosial things. Not that much because of the guitar, but mostly because of the band I've had to give up friends and things like that. But because of the guitar, there have been many times when I have had a feeling of going somewhere to do something else, but I know that in a few days we have a recording or something like that. Then I can't go, I have to stay in and practise. They are pretty small things, but sometimes they can really piss you off. But it's worth it.

Text:
21-year-old Laiho has already had time to influence a lot of futures talented players. How does that feel?

Conversation:
Alexi: There have been a couple of them and it's pretty weird, because I don't consider myself as an influence but as someone who is influenced. The situation feels so fucking unbelievable. But on the other hand, comments like that make the playing worth of it all, that I haven't done this for nothing, but actually achieved something. So of course it feels great, but I still can't understand that I would influence someone.
Interviewer: What is your biggest dream of all times as a guitarist?
Alexi: If we're talking about dreams that will never come true, it would be to play in Ozzy Osbournes band.
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Old November 24th, 2005, 01:42 PM   #48 (permalink)
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Wonder where Fatalized have gone. Thought he would've posted that interview from SRM last week.
I thought so too but I wanted my sister to read it through before I post it and help me with some phrases I got stuck on. She said she would do it soon when she gets time, but of course she hasn't got time until now. I can promise that I post it tomorrow though.
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Old November 25th, 2005, 10:57 AM   #49 (permalink)
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It's done at last. Sorry for the delays but some things got in the way (and you'll soon discover that there's a hell lot of text, with a way too long background information part in the beginning).

If you find any spelling/gramatical errors or if something just sounds odd in general, tell me and I'll try to correct it. When it's written children of Bodom (without capital C) there's nothing wrong though, because the direct translation should have been the Bodomchildren (Bodombarnen) but I thought that sounded stupid (it did in Swedish too...) so I changed it.

tjurskit = bullshit (you'll understand why I didn't translate it in the text when you read it)

And one last thing. Does anyone have any better translation for "lämna någon i sticket" than "leave someone in the lurch"?



Sudden death at Bodom

Children of Bodom returns to the scene of the crime

In 1960 four Finnish youths went camping at the lake of Bodom, one of the supposed thousand lakes in Finland. The camping trip however got a horrible ending. A madman with a knife brutally stabbed three of the youths to death. The fourth, a young man, has suppressed the event completely and doesn’t remember anything. The man who stabbed the youths has never been found. The mystery with the children of Bodom is still unsolved. That’s how the preamble to my last article about Children of Bodom. But now the mystery is no longer unsolved. Or is it? SRM has visited the scene of the crime.

One of the most legendary crimes ever in Finnish criminal history seems to get it’s solution 45 years after the crime took place. In Sweden that never would have happened because murders get statue-barred after 25 years. But a law like that doesn’t exist in Finland and you can get prosecuted for a murder no matter how long time has passed since the actual deed. Perhaps that is what’s happening right know in our eastern neighbouring country. When you read this sentence should have been pronounced in the case against the 63 years old Nils Gustafsson. Nils was the only survivor of the four youths and has in years been prosecuted for the murders of his friends the 4th of June in 1960. The retired bus driver sticks to his original story – that he doesn’t remember anything of the events that night – but still claims that he’s innocent. The prosecutor Tom Ifström has in court in Espoo referred to the result of new DNA-technology which he thinks binds Gustafsson to the crime, mainly that Gustafssons blood has been found on the three murdered: Seppo Boisman, Irmeli Björklund and Tuulikki Mäka.
According to the prosecutors story the both young men had been drinking pretty heavily whereupon Seppo and his girlfriend Tuulikki have withdrawn for more intimate intercourse. Something like that however didn’t Irmeli; who Nils was about to start off a relation ship with; wanna enter into. The rejected and heavily intoxicated youth should then have tried to get desired activity by force, whereupon Seppo and Yuulikki stepped between… yeah, you can probably figure out the rest.
But there is some troublesome factors. Gustafsson claims that it wasn’t so strange that he had his friends’ blood on himself after the prevailing jumble. Besides, he has during hypnosis left a detailed description of a, for him, unknown man who would have been the murderer and also inflicted the pretty serve injuries Nils got. Another ingredient in this peculiar story, Professor Jorma Palo contributes with. He’s supposed to one day after the murders have taken care of a confused and injured man who is said to be the German agent Hans Assman and according to Palos theory is the real murderer. The cause of the murder still being unsolved should then be that Assman was protected by the Finnish security police.

The case is solved?
But the guys in Children of Bodom don’t give much for this later theory when I go with them to the lake of Bodom to visit the scene of the crime.
It’s a nice late summer day and when we arrive the lake contains both swimmers, boats and jumping fishes. The representative of the record company has got a map over the scene of the murder, which of course is available for buying. When we’ve found our way to the exact place where three Swedish-speaking Finnish youths lost their lives a little more than 45 years ago it doesn’t feel quite as macabre and unpleasant as I had thought it would be. Maybe it’s because such a long time has passed– or maybe even more likely – because of the Finnish summer idyll and the view over the beautiful lake that makes the place an inconceivable resident for such a gory incident. Pictures should be taken and it surfaces that it’s only the second time the band has taken pictures out here, even if the lake itself has appeared on several of their CD covers. As the tent is set up several murder tourists stroll about on the place and ask curious questions to the motley company which seems to be camping on stained ground. The artists themselves are pretty amused by the situation, possibly with exception for the singer and guitarist Alexi Laiho who after arriving late mostly walks around by himself smoking constantly.
When the pictures have been taken we get into the cars and drive back to Helsinki for some food, more beer and an interview with the band – though the latter now reduced to four because the drummer Jaska Raatikainen has to leave. The conversation of course comes to circulate around the latest revelations in the murder case and Alexi admits that he voraciously follows what’s going on, not least with thought on that the well guarded trial inevitably gives a considerable amount of publicity to the lake Bodom and then also indirectly to his band.
– I’ve read as much as I’ve come across about it. There’s a lot of shit I didn’t know and obviously no one else did either. But I don’t think he’s gonna get convicted.
– I don’t think it’s our thing to say if he’s guilty or not, says the guitarist Roope Latvala but adds that Gustafsson’s going to go free.
The keyboard playing Janne Wirman agrees and reckons that there isn’t enough with evidence.
– But he has to be guilty.

Publicity for free
When I interviewed Alexi in 2003 he told me that they had chosen the band name because of the bands morbid sense of humour. Of course he thinks the name is even funnier now.
– And now it’s Bodom everywhere. Of course they don’t mention the band, but we still get free publicity every day. On the internet there are people who write that we should change name now when they’ve caught the murderer. Why? 45 years after the murder they catch the guy and he turns out be the fourth member of the company. As if that isn’t mysterious enough…
– During our whole carrier I’ve waited for a negative reaction on our band name, says the bassist Henka T. Blacksmith (Or Henkka Seppälä, which is his real name). But there hasn’t been one. Now when the case is up again it’ll probably come. But it’s good publicity for us.
When the group chose their band name they had certainly never thought that the case would actually come to a solution but Janne tells me that one of their fans actually already solved the case several years before the Finnish police did.
– There was a new fan who came to our website and found his way to the discussion forum. He wondered what the meaning behind Bodom was. Someone told him the story and he wrote that it was an obvious case. That one of the guys got laid and the other guy didn’t and got mad…
– I think he wrote that the others had a threesome or something, Alexi cuts in.
– Maybe, but what he wrote was more or less exactly what happened. He got furious because he didn’t succeed to nail the chick.
– We thought it was fun when he wrote it for a couple of years ago, Alexi continues. But we didn’t believe in it. Now when it has turned out to be true it’s actually even funnier.
You have one Bodom-song on every album. Is the one on the next album going to be about what’s now revealed?
– Probably, Janne says quickly.
– Maybe, considers Alexi. You never know.
– No, says Janne. We have to be careful with talking shit about this guy because he has fucking good lawyers.
– We’re not talking shit about the guy, objects Alexi. But we’ll see. Probably there’s gonna be something about what’s happened in some way, but how do you write lyrics about a fucking trial? I don’t know. We’ll see.

Alexander quits
Since I met Children of Bodom the last time the band has for the first time lost a member. In 2003 the astounding news came that the guitarist Alexander Kuoppala hade made the decision to quit the band. Almost as astounding was that the group short after announced that they had a new guitarist, the somewhat legendary Roope Latvala. But how does this go together with following quote from my last interview with Alexi: ”No one else can play in this band. Not because we are the best musicians in the world, but because it has to be we five. We’ve got the chemistry.”?
– I still stand up for the idea behind what I said then, Alexi explains. But obviously it doesn’t need to be exactly those five people we were then, haha! I mean, it was a difficult situation.
– It wasn’t just Alexi’s idea, says Janne to his defence. All five felt that way, that it would always be we five. You can never foresee that someone’s about to do a 180°-turn and become a totally different person.
– That’s what happened, Alexi confirms. Someone turned out to be a person we didn’t want in the band anyway. But now he quitted. We just thought that OK, now he’s met this chick. Now he’s gonna be totally rapt by her in like two months before he gets tired of the bitch and becomes the guy he used to be.
Alexi chuckles a little at how wrong they were.
– Instead he gets children and quits the band…
So when he turned out to be another person then you thought…
– No, interrupts Janne, that’s not how it was. We knew him! But he changed. He changed his lifestyle and everything that was him.
– Absolutely, agrees Alexi. It was like some other fucking guy had jumped into his body and taken over. I’m serious!
– That’s how it was, tells Janne. The band always came first. That was his first priority. And then suddenly he didn’t give a shit about the band.
– He used to be the most exaggerated rock ’n’ roll-dude you can imagine, Alexi continues. The band and the friends was everything for him. He also used to be my best friend. And suddenly neither the band nor the friends means a shit to him. And I know that I’ve always said that if someone quits we’ll bury the group. But that would be like the dumbest thing you could do. We’ve worked our asses of in many, many years for this and then should we throw that away because of one person? No way.

Former friends
Hard words rain over the former friend and member of a band where the members have had strong bonds to each other. But for Alexi it was also a hard blow when the treachery came from where he least excepted it.
– I was totally wrecked. Seriously!
Janne wasn’t quite as surprised, and had already got a feeling where things were heading. But he still got upset when Alexander left them before a number of concerts.
– Well, we couldn’t really cancel. Or maybe we could, but that would have sucked ass.
Henkka had also seen how the band mate had begun changing from being totally devoted to the band and loving touring like the others.
– On the last tour he didn’t seem happy anymore and was on the phone talking with his girlfriend all the time. To the last show, at the Tuska festival, he didn’t even come with us in the bus but instead took the car with his girlfriend. But I don’t know if he left us in the lurch. On the level we are, there’s really no good point of time to quit. I think he had planned it that way, because at least we had a little more than a month till the next concert.
– He left us in the lurch, thinks Alexi though. I asked him, I said that we only had a few booked concerts left. We had Moscow and sold out concerts in Japan. Do them with us and then quit. But he said no, he would play the Tuska festival with us and then go. And that was it. My best friend since many years!
– That’s how it really was, confirms Janne. If you asked Alexander where he was he most of the time answered “in Alexi’s car”, because they were always together and were out driving.
And how is your relationship now?
– There is no relationship, says Alexi with audible bitterness in his voice. We have no contact at all. I don’t know him anymore, I don’t even know who he is. The guy who was my friend and played guitar in the band … he’s gone. Sure, if I run into him in the street it’s “Hey, what’s up?”. I’m not mad at him anymore. But I was. You don’t treat a friend like that. OK, he couldn’t stay in the band because he wanted to live another kind of life. I can buy that. But why did he ditch all his friends? That’s not nice and that’s why I got angry.

Roope joins
However, Alexander was now just a memory. Which meant taking a place on stage for Roope Latvala. More than ten years older than the other members he already has a lot rock ‘n’ roll on his conscience. During the later half of the eighties he was a founding member of Stone, one of few Finnish bands who has been heard outside Finland before later years’ explosion. He also spent six years in fairly well known Waltari and is still playing guitar in Sinergy (in which degree that band is still existing) together with Alexi. Like the other children of Bodom he’s from the small town Espoo outside Helsinki (where thus also the lake Bodom is situated), but as the difference in age indicates that’s not how he got to know them.
When Alexander left the band during ongoing world tour, although they had somewhat of a break, they were supposed to be on stage in Moscow only a month later. Which is a very short time for finding a new guitarist who also can play with as much technical skills as the band’s music demands and be able to learn 20 songs. Not a job for some bedroom guitarist, with other words. After a failed attempt to recruit Griffin-guitarist Kai Nergaarden it was in the end Roope who went on stage with the band in Moscow the 16th of august in 2003.
– It was scary, Roope remembers. Almost a panic reaction. One sold out concert in Moscow in front of 2000 people and I had had short time to learn the songs. I practiced until the last minute. But I made it.
– He saved our asses, says Alexi. He jumped in and played the booked concerts we had and then it just went on. Suddenly we realized that he had played with us in over a year. He’s a great guitarist, a good guy and he looks good on stage.

Step by step
Roope himself remembers how it happened. He just kept playing with the band without anyone asking him if he was about to continue.
– The single thing was once in the tour bus. We were sitting, drinking and talking as usual and someone said that if you want to stay you’re welcome. Then they poured up more booze and that was the end of the discussion. We’ve never talked about it again, ha ha!
But how was it to get into such a tight fellowship that it is in this group?
– I took it step by step, answers the guitarist. You aren’t just one in the band all suddenly. I got to feel my way, how things worked, see if we were going to be friends. But their music and my guitar technique, things I played before, fit well together. So in that way it was pretty easy.
When you recruit someone like Roope in the band you of course also get a lot of experience, which probably could be favourable. And it has also been.
– He has a completely different angle of incidence than we, explains Alexi. When we go on and do stuff like we use to he can suggest that we do it in another way. And then it turns out that that works better.
Something that also works better, according to Alexi, is the musicality itself. Roope is one of the best guitarists ever, says the front man, and therefore he doesn’t need to worry when he writes new music.
– I can come up with the craziest riffs ever and know that the other guy can handle it.
Was that something you worried about with Alexander?
– I didn’t worry, but I knew his limitations.

Not dead yet
But it isn’t the ex-guitarist the new album’s title is about, even if you easily could think that when you get to know that the album name is “Are You Dead Yet?”. The title is a question that Alexi as a matter of fact asked himself after some heavy partying. That sounds like true Finnish partying …
– We had toured for “Hate Crew Deathroll” in almost two years. The last part we did was six weeks in the USA. We were so exhausted when we came home that we just kept up with the partying and everything. However, we were out with some friends and got totally wasted. I climbed up on a car roof and it was in the middle of the winter so I slipped and fell on my wrist and face and broke my arm. I got to go with a cast for seven weeks. The next day when I woke up and looked in the mirror I saw my face which was totally trashed with stitches, a black eye and everything. And a cast on my arm! And I asked myself “What have you done the last two years?” I guess “Are You Dead Yet” could be translated as “Have you got enough yet?”.
– But we had fun, Janne cuts in.
– Yes, Alexi admits, we had.
– We had too fun on the tours, laughs Janne. Maybe everyone weren’t in as bad condition, but what happened to Alexi made us think.
Oh yes. Children Of Bodom is still one of the rare bands that actually think it’s fun to tour, when many others complain over jetlag, monotony and being away from home. Not to mention the not so unproblematic with being together 24/7 during very long time. These are things that can consume the best fellowship and trivialities as snoring, gum chewing or choice of movie can cause conflicts of warlike dimensions. But not for the children of Bodom.
– We get on fucking great with each other all the time, Alexi assures.
– Like I said we even have too much fun, Janne agrees. It doesn’t even feel like work anymore.
How’s that possible? Alexi does an attempt to an explanation of conflict solving à la Children of Bodom:
– We tell each other without being rude. If someone does something you think is annoying you just say “Stop that, dude” and slap him, then it’s all good.
Janne tells me that they have toured with many bands that didn’t seem to have fun and he wonders why they just can’t seem to agree.
– When we toured with Iced Earth they didn’t have fun, Alexi remembers. Some guys, one of them their now ex-guitarist, came all the time to our tour bus because that’s where the party was and he hung around with us all the time. But that created conflicts in that band. Jon Shaffer (Iced Earth’s rhythm guitarist and the prime mover) couldn’t take it, he got pissed.
– The guitarist wasn’t allowed to be in our bus, Janne fills in. He was forced to hang around in their bus where everyone hated each other, ha ha!

Still not dead
It’s nice that they get on so well with each other, but I think we got a little of track. It was the new album we were supposed to talk about. For example we want to know the children of Bodom’s own views on it. Janne makes the conclusion it definitely is a progression since the last one, so much that even he is surprised.
– We’ll never make the same album twice or some shit like that. But I’m still so attached to the last record. I think that “Hate Crew Deatroll” is so fucking good that I’m still trying to get used to the new record. We’re probably just trying to figure out what’s going on, ha ha! But we are very satisfied with the result. And the recording process was very easy and smooth.
– Yes, Alexi agrees. For sure the easiest so far.
In what way?
– We recorded and mixed it in six weeks. The last one was recorded in six weeks and then we mixed it in ten days or so.
Even Alexi has strong feelings for the precursor and has had difficulties with how to go on from it, it turns out.
– I really love “Hate Crew Deatroll” and it felt like it would be very hard to top it. But then I realized that you can’t think like that. And I’m very glad that we could to do something completely different. Not completely different, there’s a lot of same shit going on but it’s fresh. It’s not “Hate Crew Deatroll” part 2.
Henkka tells me that when they first begun practicing the songs it sounded pretty much as usual.
– That song is good. And this one and that one. But then when we were done recording it and had mixed it I got really surprised [in a positive way] by the result.
– One good way to figure out if a record is good is to check how many times you can listen to it without getting tired, says Roope. I’ve had the CD in the car for weeks and heard it I don’t know how many times and it’s still not boring. That’s a fucking good sign.
How would you describe the difference?
– That’s very hard, says Janne. I’ve tried to figure it out …
– Try again, laughs Alexi.
– Something that’s different is the keyboards, says of course the band’s keyboard player, We tried a little harder with it, with creating good sounds. More modern sounds.
– Especially on the keyboard but also on the whole, Alexi agrees. We’ve tried to be more open-minded about how to record an album. This time we were quite a lot in Janne’s studio before [the recording] and tried out ideas. We would never have done like that two years ago, then it was only the standard sounds. This time we haven’t fallen back on what’s “right within metal”, rather the opposite. We’ve avoided the most common strings and bells. But sure, there are things like that too because you must have that.

Bull faeces
The last time I talked to Alexi he told me that he had gone through some “tjurskit” which had been the inspiration for the music on “Hate Crew Deathroll”. When I mention it and ask what has inspired “Are You Dead Yet?” he laughs.
– Bullshit, ha ha! I mean, everyone has that sort of shit in their lives. It’s unavoidable, it’s a part of life. But for my own I’ve learned to get inspired of the stupid things that makes me pissed.
He explains it doesn’t have to be the big things in life you get pissed of. It was different when he was young. The 18-year old who recorded “Something Wild” and saw everything through a juvenile angry red wrathshimmer and who wrote lyrics about slitting his wrists, downing pills and drinking booze has grown up and nowadays he gets the furious energy for the music and the lyrics from more ordinary everyday situations.
– Now it’s more a mental condition, to be pissed. It could be anything, like getting stuck in the traffic or miss when you’re playing playstation. You get that rush, you know. It doesn’t have to be something big like when I was younger. But at that time I was more fucked in the head.
Are you wiser now?
– Much wiser, ha ha! Much wiser!

The 7th October, which is just before this magazine’s going to the press, Nils Gustafsson got acquitted on the grounds of deficient evidence.
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Old November 25th, 2005, 04:17 PM   #50 (permalink)
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Thx for your time guys/girls great to read these
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