Andy Sneap & Backstage Productions  

Go Back   Ultimate Metal Forum > Heavy Metal Forums > Andy Sneap > F.O.H.
Register FAQ Donate Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

F.O.H. Production tips, techniques, tutorials...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old July 25th, 2011, 04:11 PM   #1 (permalink)
MaellaJohn
Senior Member
 
MaellaJohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida, United States
Posts: 584
Having a band member as an all-in-one audio engineer

This is something that I've been thinking about for a while now.

I'm seriously considering devoting a lot more time to refining my engineering skills [if I could call them that] for the purpose of being the sole engineer on my band's music.

The first thing that comes to mind is the massive amount of money that can be saved and I don't mind doing the work at all.
The second thing is that the sound from what's being heard will ALL come from the band. Not having to rely on other people to make us sound better would make me very proud.

Some obvious cons would be that I'm nowhere near experienced enough to make pure gold. But what do you guys think about this kind of thing?

Are there any more cons that come to mind when doing all the production within the band?

Also, what about business-wise and with labels? I'm not exactly sure how record deals work, but would labels enjoy a good band who can get a good sounding record by themselves since the label's budget could be then focused on promotion and distro, or whatever else, or what?
MaellaJohn is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 04:18 PM   #2 (permalink)
vespiz
/thread
 
vespiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tampere, Finland
Posts: 1,484
One con is that you can lose perspective more easily, since you're so in the songs. It can also be a benefit, if you can balance between being the "objective producer" and the musician as you know the songs inside and out and know what the band should sound like.

If you feel inadequate to bring the project to it's best outcome, at least give the finished recording to someone else for a test mix and see (hear!) what they have to offer.

If you can get something off the labels, then it's all good in these times!!
__________________
Jussi Kulomaa
mstr-studio | Ruuhkatukka Tuotanto Oy / Rush-Hair Production ltd
www.masterstroke.info | https://www.facebook.com/Masterstrokefinland | Masterstroke - Broken out now!
vespiz is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 04:25 PM   #3 (permalink)
MaellaJohn
Senior Member
 
MaellaJohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida, United States
Posts: 584
Quote:
Originally Posted by vespiz View Post
One con is that you can lose perspective more easily, since you're so in the songs.
This is definitely a big con.
Whether or not my own songs are recorded by someone else, I can never accurately judge the song because it's mine. I'm not sure to what degree that affects other musicians, but it makes it hard to decide what would really sound best in the end!
MaellaJohn is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 04:32 PM   #4 (permalink)
vespiz
/thread
 
vespiz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tampere, Finland
Posts: 1,484
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaellaJohn View Post
This is definitely a big con.
Whether or not my own songs are recorded by someone else, I can never accurately judge the song because it's mine. I'm not sure to what degree that affects other musicians, but it makes it hard to decide what would really sound best in the end!
But then again.. are you doing it for others or for yourself?
__________________
Jussi Kulomaa
mstr-studio | Ruuhkatukka Tuotanto Oy / Rush-Hair Production ltd
www.masterstroke.info | https://www.facebook.com/Masterstrokefinland | Masterstroke - Broken out now!
vespiz is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 04:38 PM   #5 (permalink)
MaellaJohn
Senior Member
 
MaellaJohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida, United States
Posts: 584
Well, I'm a vocalist so that puts me in a better position than a guitarist, I think, in terms of losing perspective. But it would be for my bandmates and I.
MaellaJohn is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 04:38 PM   #6 (permalink)
BrettT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,759
Quote:
Originally Posted by vespiz View Post
One con is that you can lose perspective more easily, since you're so in the songs. It can also be a benefit, if you can balance between being the "objective producer" and the musician as you know the songs inside and out and know what the band should sound like.
THIS! I've sort of taken on this role in my band with our upcoming full length, and all my creative energy has been going into the engineering aspect of the music. My songwriting input has certainly taken a backseat.

It's also put more of a strain on my relationships with some of the band members due to the stresses of recording and mixing.

Don't know if I'm ever going to do it again, honestly. We've saved tons of money, but I just don't know if I want to go through the hassle again unless it's for my own solo project.
BrettT is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 05:16 PM   #7 (permalink)
scorpio01169
Senior Member
 
scorpio01169's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 1,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrettT View Post

It's also put more of a strain on my relationships with some of the band members due to the stresses of recording and mixing.
I was kicked out of a band because the other members felt that all of the recording gear I worked my ass off to get should be for "The Band" to use anytime they wanted.
__________________



Tools: Mackie 32.8+24E Mackie, Hdr 24/96+ Mdr 24/96 recorders, Lucid GenX clock, Sony CDWR33 mixdown deck, Ibanez Bass, Mesa Boogie Amp, Gallien Kreuger Cab, Pearl Export series drums.
scorpio01169 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 05:23 PM   #8 (permalink)
crillemannen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,150
I would like to produce my band (if i ever get into one) of course you can lose the perspective but that is somewhat related to how involved you are in the writing process.
I could think of getting a producer involved to get some perspective and adding some fresh ideas. but i would most likely be mixing and recording the music myself, because i have developed my own taste when it comes to how a mix should sound so i wouldn't like anyone else to fiddle with that
__________________
-


studiohaga.net

Facebook
crillemannen is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 05:24 PM   #9 (permalink)
otop
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 25
The best part about doing everything within the band = Complete control over every aspect of the music.

The worst part is that things take much longer because its really hard to reach a finishing point when the project is at your fingertips every day.

My band has a pretty good system going where 3/5 members play a big part in the recording/ mixing process. One focuses on vocal production, the other tracks a majority of the guitars, and someone else does all the mixing/tones.

With all the free software and information out there, every band should be able to at least produce their own material.

But honestly, set deadlines for everything.. Any good musician will wake up, listen to what they thought was complete and realize that there's much more work to be done.

As for the record label question.. Yes labels love self sufficient bands, and the cool part is most labels will provide advances for each album released meaning the band can use the 1 to 5 grand advance for other things like touring equip. All the label wants usually is the master, and the copyrights to the master.
__________________
Corelia
otop is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 05:30 PM   #10 (permalink)
crillemannen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,150
Btw.. i would never do a full length album without being signed or having some sort of budget because it would take to much time and effort. I would never be putting me or the band in a situation where we end up spending a year and a half on recording because we have to do it on weekends and such.
__________________
-


studiohaga.net

Facebook
crillemannen is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 05:36 PM   #11 (permalink)
MaellaJohn
Senior Member
 
MaellaJohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida, United States
Posts: 584
I really enjoy having complete control over everything.

Also, I'm really keen on deadlines. With a project I had been in for over a year with my buddy, I was always trying to set deadlines and session dates for getting recording done. He was the guitarist, but he never wanted to get together to do it. He always just wanted to record it when he felt like it, and that was incredibly frustrating.

I think to do this successfully I need to put myself in the band AND outside the band at the same time. Keep everything professional and formal like when booking dates in any other studio. Otherwise, I'm sure things will turn out sloppy, people will get frustrating, and things like that..

Another thing I've thought about were reamps.
As of right now, I don't have the equipment I want to get the tones I want.

So even though we're doing everything, I'd probably go to somebody else for tonezzz until I get a nice collection of amps [which could take a very long time, heh].
MaellaJohn is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2011, 08:48 PM   #12 (permalink)
if6was9
Ireland
 
if6was9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: lreland
Posts: 1,568
Having been an engineer for my own band, engineer for other bands, having someone else in my band engineer us and been recorded by a third party I've experienced alot of the different angles with this.

I don't know if I'd like someone in a band I'm in to be in charge past the pre production anymore, even if they are capable of making a good end product, even myself. It's too stressful and there's things you can say to a producer you're hiring that you can't to a band member without their feelings getting hurt. Especially when they're not doing it for money as you suggest. How do you tell someone you play with that you don't like what they're doing with the recording? How would you feel if your guitarist said it to you. A third party guy will stand back and take a fresh look at it. Someone as involved as a band member recording the whole thing with their own idea of what it's like who's put months into the cd already for free isn't going to respond so well.

I think the best thing to do is make use of your skills and do a really thorough pre prod. You can save alot of money by doing a good, long pre production. Get all your click tracks down perfectly and record a full demo version of the release so you know what to expect when tracking and any problem parts you might run into that you can work on before hitting a paid studio. Have perfect guide guitar tracks laid down for drum tracking and have all your band knowing exactly what they're doing. This will shave days off your recording time and what may have taken you 2+ weeks could take 8 days. You don't have to be completely absent for the mixing either, request to sit in towards the end and work with them to get a sound you both like.

Also, working with another engineer/producer lets you pick someone who's work you also love and treat it as a learning experience and a chance to pick up a new level of understanding of the recording process from another angle.
__________________
-----------------------
My Studio - Reamping. Wide selection of amps!
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Ciaran-Culhane-Recording

Check out my band Shardborne. E.P available for free!
Bandcamp - http://shardborne.bandcamp.com
Soundcloud - http://soundcloud.com/shardborne
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/ShardborneIreland
if6was9 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2011, 08:31 AM   #13 (permalink)
nwright
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Castle, Indiana
Posts: 3,096
I'm the "recording guy" for our band, and I like the total control it allows a band to have. I feel I have a thick skin, and the band is MUCH more relaxed about the sound of the recordings more so than I am, so they have yet to offer any criticisms I don't already hear myself, or I am usually much harder on the final outcome than they are, by a LONG shot. It does take up more time, our last full length took 9 months from the first day of tracking until release day, but it was rewarding for all of us. There is no doubt that my mixes do NOT reach a fully professional level, as I am not a pro, but IMO (and others, including national press) give it as much praise as most of the metal releases these days, so we're not complaining, and we know it surpasses what we'd get with local studios (as metal isn't a big thing around here).

It may not work for all bands, but our band is pretty much 100% DIY in EVERY aspect of being in a band, and we really like that aspect of what/who we are as a group.
nwright is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2011, 08:38 AM   #14 (permalink)
drew_drummer
Dancefap
 
drew_drummer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: London, UK
Posts: 6,400
It works for me. But we've done all the writing before we've even thought about recording - once we start recording, 99% of the writing is done. You're asking for trouble if you're gonna write and produce at the same time as tracking and mixing.
__________________
TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE DISASTER
HOME PAGE :: BIG CARTEL :: YOUTUBE :: TWITTER :: FACEBOOK
"Part doom, part sludge, part stoner, part post-rock, Exegesis is all win. Its a marriage of inspired songwriting, highly skilled performance, and close-to-perfect production engineering.
www.nocleansinging.com


drew_drummer is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2011, 08:49 AM   #15 (permalink)
nwright
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Castle, Indiana
Posts: 3,096
Quote:
Originally Posted by drew_drummer View Post
It works for me. But we've done all the writing before we've even thought about recording - once we start recording, 99% of the writing is done. You're asking for trouble if you're gonna write and produce at the same time as tracking and mixing.
This, this, this.

We demo/pre-prod everything, too.

And I also try to seperate tracking from tone seeking to try to keep the right "hats" on my head at the right time. Recording DI's and then reamping allows me to seperate the "tone seeking engineer" side of me from the "well performing musician" side.
nwright is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2011, 08:56 AM   #16 (permalink)
guitarguru777
Senior Member
 
guitarguru777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 8,489
+1000 on what Drew said.

I have the advantage in my band of having a gf / wife that is just as objective about shit as I am. So if I start to lose focus or start to delve too deeply into something she usually comes in and says ... let me listen then tells me if what I am doing from a listeners perspective is working. She is an INVALUABLE tool to me cause she understands the process, the sound I am going for and shes NOT a musician, so that little lick i played where the one note was a G instead of an F# to her sounds good and its not noticeable from a listeners standpoint.

On the other hand with that she doesnt know technical terms so sometimes I have to decipher things. Like yesterday I was working on a basic drum mix and she came in and said its too "low", I was like what is? she said the whole thing .. its just too low... No other instruments are in how can it be low?? She then said its shaking the walls ... OH YOU MEAN TOO MUCH LOW END??

Things like that happen all the time ...lol
__________________
Reamping Available: Peavey 5150,Krank Nineteen80,Trip Recto,JCM800,JCM900,Marshall TSL 100,74' Marshall JMP,Randall RD100

Mixing & Mastering Available -constantinestudios (at) gmail.com

My Recent Discography:
Dario Lorina - Dario Lorina - Shrapnel Records (2013)
Jacky Vincent - Star X Speed Story - Shrapnel Records (2013)
Stoney Curtis Band - Halo Of Dark Matter - Blues Bureau (2013)
Vinny Moore, Kelly Keeling, Scot Coogan - Magna Carta Records (2014)
[/size]
guitarguru777 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2011, 09:28 AM   #17 (permalink)
Scott Horner
Scottimus Maximus
 
Scott Horner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Decatur/DFW, Texas
Posts: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpio01169 View Post
I was kicked out of a band because the other members felt that all of the recording gear I worked my ass off to get should be for "The Band" to use anytime they wanted.
That's some horseshit.
__________________
-Scott
www.bellwetherrecordings.com
Scott Horner is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2011, 09:46 AM   #18 (permalink)
zirkonflex
You name it
 
zirkonflex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Northern Germany
Posts: 520
I'm lead guitarist and producer/engineer/roadie in my local alternative band, no other member knows a shit about the technical stuff.
It works, even though I usually listen/play/produce different music.

Important is probably that we are all bros from the old times and can tell eachother all the shit in the world, blatantly flaming eachothers playing and loling afterwards.
I think thats how it's supposed to be in a band, nobody should be pissed if you critique his playing/singing whatever, we're all humans after all.

/We write/record/get drunk at my studio in real time btw., with me doing the majority of tracking, we'll also change seats if somebody wants to try something and mostly not everybody is there (I'll probably write one song with the other guitarist and the next day arrange drum patterns with the base player).
Just not be an ego dick.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plendakor View Post
Fuck Angela. Allisa is the hottest babe in the metal scene, period.
She growls and does clean but who cares, at the end of the day y'all wanna hear her gag on your stick.

Last edited by zirkonflex : July 26th, 2011 at 09:55 AM.
zirkonflex is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2011, 02:37 AM   #19 (permalink)
greyskull
Senior Member
 
greyskull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,943
Mate that's how I got into this game...
greyskull is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2011, 04:42 AM   #20 (permalink)
drope934
Senior Member
 
drope934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Posts: 179
I'm actually beginning to record my band so I can give you my 2 cents: It can be hard.

The other members of the band know shit about recording/mixing and think that it's easy/quick to record a song (the other guitarist wants to record our 14 songs by recording "a bit" during our rehearsal, max 2h per week!) and some of them don't want to get "orders" from me (it's different if you're working with a pro, since you pay him, you'll listen to him more I think).

Don't forget that you'll not necessary have to do the all production by yourself! If your recordings are good ("sonically" speaking) , you could give 2-3 songs to a pro for a good/better mixing or mastering.

As said before, if your songs are already written, it's kinda easy to focus on the recording.

And well, don't forget that some people here will me pleased to mix one of your song for free and give you advices about their mixes to help you out
drope934 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2011, 05:13 AM   #21 (permalink)
elsenator
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 16
I have some personal experience with this. These are my comments:

Pros:
- It gives you total control. You know the band, you know the sound, you can do the magic, even from record to record.
- If you do stuff properly, your band members will believe in you, and this is really nice.
- You save a shitload of money!
- You can do everything in your own time. This is actually also a con, since this often leads to laziness for the entire band. But overall, it's nice to be able to do everything when you all feel like it.
- Less people have to be involved, so it's very easy to do a cool sounding 3-track demo, whenever you feel like it. Still very time consuming, but if you know your stuff, you can make a very decent sounding demo in no time, with very few people needed for the process.
- When you've been through the process a few times, all members of the band know what to do, and when to do it, because you do things the same way every time. This saves time in the long run I believe.
- IF you manage to get the other members of the band to buy a decent audio interface, you can teach them to record the DI tracks back in their homes. Now you are only required to help them set up a project for it, and 2 weeks later, you have the completed DI track, and you didn't even have to get involved. This only works if they have the proper discipline and knowledge of what is required for a "guitar take" to be usable. They also need basic knowledge of how a DAW works.

Cons:
- You tend to do things the same way each time. This leaves little room for "new sound" to enter the band
- You, and you alone, are to blame if things are messed up. This is a heavy burden for one band member to bear. And believe me, something WILL go wrong along the way.
- It's extremely time consuming! It might not seem so bad when you think about it, but at some point you probably will go to bed thinking "daaaamn, I need some time off from this".
- You need to be there every step along the way. Nothing gets done without you being there to grab the steering wheel. This is stressful in the long run.
- It often, not intentionally, puts the rest of the band on the back seat during recording. Half the time you open your mouth they don't understand what you're saying (tech stuff).
- There will be questions from the band members where you can only answer "because that's what I believe to be the best". This is not cool, but sometimes intuition can't be explained. To the band members this is rather off-putting because it seems like you don't know what you're doing even though you probably are.
- It's expensive, mainly for yourself. You need the right equipment. Using a lousy audio interface, shitty mics and cheap amps won't give you a good result. EVERY SINGLE PART OF YOUR CHAIN REFLECTS ON THE FINAL PRODUCT, even the guitar pick! Don't underestimate this.
- It gives you less room to experiment, since you often have lousy recording facilities and less equipment to experiment with (cabs, amps, mics and so on).
elsenator is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2011, 09:39 AM   #22 (permalink)
Scott Horner
Scottimus Maximus
 
Scott Horner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Decatur/DFW, Texas
Posts: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by elsenator View Post
I have some personal experience with this. These are my comments:

Pros:
- It gives you total control. You know the band, you know the sound, you can do the magic, even from record to record.
- If you do stuff properly, your band members will believe in you, and this is really nice.
- You save a shitload of money!
- You can do everything in your own time. This is actually also a con, since this often leads to laziness for the entire band. But overall, it's nice to be able to do everything when you all feel like it.
- Less people have to be involved, so it's very easy to do a cool sounding 3-track demo, whenever you feel like it. Still very time consuming, but if you know your stuff, you can make a very decent sounding demo in no time, with very few people needed for the process.
- When you've been through the process a few times, all members of the band know what to do, and when to do it, because you do things the same way every time. This saves time in the long run I believe.
- IF you manage to get the other members of the band to buy a decent audio interface, you can teach them to record the DI tracks back in their homes. Now you are only required to help them set up a project for it, and 2 weeks later, you have the completed DI track, and you didn't even have to get involved. This only works if they have the proper discipline and knowledge of what is required for a "guitar take" to be usable. They also need basic knowledge of how a DAW works.

Cons:
- You tend to do things the same way each time. This leaves little room for "new sound" to enter the band
- You, and you alone, are to blame if things are messed up. This is a heavy burden for one band member to bear. And believe me, something WILL go wrong along the way.
- It's extremely time consuming! It might not seem so bad when you think about it, but at some point you probably will go to bed thinking "daaaamn, I need some time off from this".
- You need to be there every step along the way. Nothing gets done without you being there to grab the steering wheel. This is stressful in the long run.
- It often, not intentionally, puts the rest of the band on the back seat during recording. Half the time you open your mouth they don't understand what you're saying (tech stuff).
- There will be questions from the band members where you can only answer "because that's what I believe to be the best". This is not cool, but sometimes intuition can't be explained. To the band members this is rather off-putting because it seems like you don't know what you're doing even though you probably are.
- It's expensive, mainly for yourself. You need the right equipment. Using a lousy audio interface, shitty mics and cheap amps won't give you a good result. EVERY SINGLE PART OF YOUR CHAIN REFLECTS ON THE FINAL PRODUCT, even the guitar pick! Don't underestimate this.
- It gives you less room to experiment, since you often have lousy recording facilities and less equipment to experiment with (cabs, amps, mics and so on).
These are pretty much my thoughts exactly. Especially the cons. And the only thing they will focus on is the stuff that goes wrong that they can blame you for.

I was just doing shitty demos for my old band when all I had was FL Studio and the other guitar player expected everything to be done with the push of a button, not understanding that every single drum hit and velocity change had to be done by hand. Or not understanding that you won't get a cranked amp sound with amp sims. It was the most frustrating thing ever. I just hope that your band mates are not as dense and actually understand the work, time and money you will be putting into it. When they are hanging out drinking and not practicing their instruments you will be stuck working on songs. Good luck.
__________________
-Scott
www.bellwetherrecordings.com
Scott Horner is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2011, 04:53 PM   #23 (permalink)
Mago
Austrian Blech Machine
 
Mago's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 4,471
Gonna jump in here too, cause I think I've got a pretty nice variation of this thing going on with my band.

We 2 guitarplayers got into recording together, but at some point down the road I focused more on mixing stuff and the other guy focused on building pedals and amps and stuff.
Pretty cool because we have both the knowledge to record, knowing what is a good take and editing...altho I have a bit better recording equipment than him at home.

So even if I do (/did for our debut album, dunno yet how we're gonna do follow ups and stuff) a lot of work for our band it's cool to have someone else to be able to count on with a lot of things.
Also considering mixing and writing issues. My GF/singer of the band is also a real good help because she's good a good ear for mixes and isn't shy to tell me when something sucks (both mixing and music).
I'm not really sure if I could have done so much alone, without support from my band/friends...so it's really a though one.
But I also did all the graphic related stuff too...logo, artwork, cd case, booklet, online stuff...was fun but a bit too much after all think I will give that one out of hand for future stuff

Most of the pro's and con's have allready been named.
The biggest con for me with doing stuff yourself is that I got a bit lazy at times, and stuff took longer then it would have if had to have pay for the recording time.
So sometimes I just worked stuff out during recording, or did 2 weeks of recording and then 1 month off...
Next time we're having a bigger project I'm definitly going to have everything figured out beforehand and let the guys and girl book studiotime with me...makes stuff go a lot faster.

I don't mind that it takes a lot of time, cause I like to do it.

Hardest thing for sure is to stay objective, but as I said, Im lucky to have a few pairs of ears to tell that.
__________________
HARPIA DEIIS - Melodic Death/Thrash Metal
FACEBOOK | BANDCAMP
Mago is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2011, 01:25 PM   #24 (permalink)
Damage, Inc.
Senior Member
 
Damage, Inc.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: The hive of scum and villainy known as Clinton, IA
Posts: 129
I agree with most of the posts so far. You have more control over what's going on, but mixing is really its own art form, and you have to put a ton of time into learning how to do it properly. I'm mixing my band's release that's coming out later this month. It has been a great learning experience, but I don't plan on doing it again.
__________________


www.facebook.com/e11eventhhour<--free download and video
www.e11eventhhour.net
Damage, Inc. is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2011, 11:38 AM   #25 (permalink)
solphilcox
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nashville
Posts: 166
done this with pretty much every band i've ever been in, the whole reason i got into production was out of necessity to record high school band demos on zero budget (with local studios where im from being both shit and expensive), and gradually became just as big a deal as actually playing in the bands themselves.

just finished up engineering and producing my band's latest EP, the first we did last summer. it has been a taxing experience, it's so much easier to lose vision on a project when it's your own music, so i've just been calling up other engineer buddies to lend impartial ears when i've needed them. it worked out okay in the end, and i hope to continue doing it!
__________________
i make records
solphilcox is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.0.0
© Copyright 2000-2014 UltimateMetal.com | MetalAges Media