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Audio Engineering and Schooling (Please give opinions.)

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by ShipwreckSoundWorks, Aug 18, 2012.

  1. ShipwreckSoundWorks

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    Hey guys.
    So I'm in my senior year of high school and college is right around the corner. Part of me knows that my best bet is getting a regular job, and doing audio engineering on the side, but if I have the oppourtunity at an education in the field, I want to take full advantage of it.
    I've landed on two options schooling wise, and I want your opinions on what would be best.
    1.) Spend a ton of money on a university for an education in audio engineering while double majoring in something as a back up. I feel like this wouldn't be my best option because how seriously does the business world takes a BFA in audio engineering seriously? I mean I could still intern at studios and such. I'm so sketched about this type of eduction because I know a guy in the area that has this kind of schooling and his productions are pathetic.
    2.) Take studio classes instead of university classes. Work more In studios and take formal classes in a studio. I feel like this would be more beneficial. Not spend nearly as much money.
    Summary:
    University or Studio education?
     
  2. BLUElightCory

    BLUElightCory Member

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    Where do you live? Here in AZ there are great community college audio programs that offer almost all of the same benefits (plus or minus a few thing) of the high end trade schools at a much lower cost.

    The most responsible thing to do would be to get a degree in a forward-thinking field that can be related to our field (business, marketing, electrical engineering, whatever) so that you always have a backup in place, as the recording industry is BRUTAL if you're trying to make a living.

    In the end, it's important to learn the fundamentals, but experience is king and nothing will replace it, so start looking around for some internships, get to know as many bands as you can, and start getting your hands dirty.
     
  3. ShipwreckSoundWorks

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    Over here in NM there aren't many good programs. Couple courses I could take at the university that I hear are beneficial but other than that not much. I plan on going to Nashville when senior year is over and doing internships and schooling out there! I think it would be smart to just get more experience like you said.
    Thanks so much for the feedback!
     
  4. -Noodles-

    -Noodles- 3 Initals Mixer

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    Disclaimer: I'm an educator in Higher Education.

    I think it depends on how you want to approach your own learning. Are you a driven person who could do with tutors giving you assignments - or would you be happy to learn in the evenings at your own speed?
    Both are equally admirable ways to learn. Often the students I teach are a real mixture. Some have come to university because they think that's what they should do. Others have come for the experience. Not all of them have asked themselves what they want out of it - and those that haven't often struggle with their studies.

    Schooling is costly - so can you cope with living under hardship?
    There will be many contributors on the forum, and the internet, who will say that universities are pointless and that you're better off learning first hand on the job. I would like to say that this is always true. Sadly, there are a lot of terrible studios who will pay you very little money and teach you even less. Or worse; they'll teach you things that aren't true.

    If you can find an internship at a good studio then that is a good way to learn, especially as you'll make contacts while earning a bit of money.

    If you're a good student, and you're in a good year group - you'll make plenty of contacts and have access to studio gear that won't cost you to use. Bear in mind that a degree trains you in how to assess and critically evaluate a subject. You hone your skills to understand the chosen field to a much higher degree than those who don't (at least at the same rate). Not everyone who goes to university has the same drive, tenacity or skill set and that's what can make it fun.

    I completely agree with Cory - try out some sessions at a studio. Find out if it's for you. This industry is hard to make money, and harder to keep making money.
     
  5. kev

    kev Im guybrush threepwood

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    I find it increasingly difficult to believe anybody can make a substantial living off of audio setting up nowadays. Bloody hard industry with the vast percentage of the money getting creamed at the top until you make some kind of break most likely after years of hard work . Hopefully I'm wrong though :lol:
     
  6. ShipwreckSoundWorks

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    Thanks a lot. I'll try some of that studio session and interning and see how it goes I suppose. Honestly though, I don't even care if I make a living off of it, I want to just get a good education and learn the secrets/cool techniques that YouTube videos just can't show you. :p
     
  7. Empathy

    Empathy Bulging Member

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    I'm on the verge of (finally) finishing my AE degree at SAE, and I will say this; I regret it wholly and utterly. I have learned more through my own explorations and experimentation than I have at that place, without a doubt. Hell, this forum alone taught me more than I feel I've learned at SAE. What do I get out of it? A Bachelor of Arts and a $40,000 debt to the government (on top of my $12,000 from previous courses).
     
  8. xTomx

    xTomx Member

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    I regret doing my degree completely, I've done a degree that's taken seriously nowhere and for a fuckload of debt when I could have learned the same renting out studios and reading.
     
  9. Sloan

    Sloan Sounds like shit!

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    For the love of god please please please get an education in something that will pay the bills. Bust your ass doing audio work/education on the side and hopefully it will lead to more, and better work as the years go by. As you get better, maybe you'll be able to do it full time. Stay in school!
     
  10. I just started college. My passion is music. I love this forum. I decided to do EE (electrical engineering) and I hope it will lead to music if I work hard at it.
     
  11. Charlie E.

    Charlie E. Member

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    I agree with this guy! Maybe you can minor in AE or something but definitely concentrate your degree on something else that's more flexible and stable.
     
  12. Gelatin

    Gelatin Boob inspector

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    Couldn't agree more.
     
  13. greyskull

    greyskull Member

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    I never went to an engineering school; but did do a music degree; and have made a living out of engineering. Make of that what you will.
     
  14. ShipwreckSoundWorks

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    Thanks so much for the opinions guys. I have heard many bad things about getting audio engineering degrees. Aside from that, I want to go to college for Pharmacology and after that 4 years I'll have tons of free time to do audio stuff on the side, and I would rather get an education working in the field, not in a class room.
    Love this forum so much <3
     
  15. BLUElightCory

    BLUElightCory Member

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    Excellent plan.
     
  16. Kita

    Kita Member

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    Find an internship. Unless you're a wanker you'll probably end up with a job in the end and you'll learn a lot more. I know a line a mile long filled with Full Sail graduates.
     
  17. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    Did 3 years. Came out with a 'Bachelor's Degree of Audio Engineering' which I've not shown anyone, nor been asked to ever. Not worth it.
     
  18. HOFX

    HOFX Member

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    There's enough resources online to self teach at your own pace.+1 on the degree in other field, I did chemical engineering and IT which funds any GAS and allows me to pursue the hobby without dealing with clients.
     
  19. infectdsniper

    infectdsniper Member

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    yes i would say electrical engineering is the way to go with no audio engineering courses at all because it can be your fallback and if the studio works out then you will have the knowledge to repair broken equipment. but if you can take some music theory classes because that will be leagues more helpful.
     
  20. ashgallows

    ashgallows resonant manipulator

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    went to a top 3 engineering program. didnt really learn anything but how to use protools, which i promptly forgot because they didnt give me a copy for after my graduation. I had to relearn it later. worked at a top 40 studio in hollywood for 3 years and pretty much just got people food for min wage, with an occasional vocal chain setup here and there. When I quit to try and find a job that I had some hope of getting a living wage in, i was S.O.L. pretty much everywhere and am now working at a pizza place...so....fun. Get a degree in something like healthcare or computer programming, and learn from these guys for your engineering needs.
     

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