This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.

Join the Chaos

Want to join in with the rest of the Hate Crew? Sign up today!

COB Interviews

Discussion in 'Children Of Bodom' started by COBHC Webmaster, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. COB-666

    COB-666 New Metal Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
  2. COB-666

    COB-666 New Metal Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
  3. sleeper666

    sleeper666 MetalMutha

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,503
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Suomi on mun kohtaloni
    http://www.billboard.com/articles/c...w-deathroll-anniversary-alexi-laiho-interview

    Children of Bodom's Alexi Laiho on Watershed Record 'Hate Crew Deathroll': 'We Nailed It'
    11/15/2017 by Geneva Hallenbach

    • FACEBOOK
    • TWITTER
    • EMAIL ME

    [​IMG]
    Courtesy Photo
    Children of Bodom
    Finnish metal band's North American tour celebrates its first four albums
    Finnish metal band Children of Bodom embarked on the 20 Years Down N’ Dirty North America Tour on Oct. 31 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of its debut album, Something Wild. The group — which took its name from the 1960 unsolved murders of three teens who were killed while camping at Lake Bodom in Espoo, Finland — is paying homage to Something Wild by playing obscure tracks from the set, as well as rarities from its subsequent albums Hatebreeder, Follow the Reaper and Hate Crew Deathroll. It was the latter album that pushed the group into the mainstream in 2003, due to its positive critical reception, and enabled COB to finally tour the United States.

    “After all those years, we got to tour in the States for the first time,” recalls singer-guitarist Alexi Laiho of the doors that Hate Crew Deathroll opened. “We were young, and we were fucking crazy. Every single day we had a blast on the stage, and after the show, it was a fucking mad party.”

    He fondly recalls how, when hanging with contemporaries like Dimmu Borgir and Nevermore, “it [was] like, if you don't keep up with those guys, you're not fucking rock 'n' roll enough. We didn't have that problem. We were fucking pros already. I remember Nevermore — those fucking guys, holy shit. The way they were drinking vodka, even we were freaked out.”

    Laiho has since tempered his alcohol consumption, especially while touring — “I don't drink on the road anymore because the hangovers are so fucking horrible that I don't want to feel like a fucking roadkill on the stage the day after.” But his appreciation for what the band achieved with Hate Crew Deathroll remains undiminished, and Laiho reflects on that album as well as the rest of their discography with Billboard.

    I was reading, and I don’t know if this is accurate, that you had some misgivings, shall we say, about the first album.

    I wouldn’t say misgivings, but when you think about it, it’s the first album, and it’s far from perfect. But the more I listen to it now — because I had to learn a couple of things here and there — the more I actually like that we were not striving for perfection or any of that. It was just pure teenage fuckin’ rage and rebellion. Things like production, they were completely secondary facts. I kind of dig that. Also, song-wise, it’s very, I don’t know. I guess “juvenile” would be the word. I have improved as a songwriter. I would put 10 different riffs in one song, but they don’t really go together … It was more about showing off and being pissed off.

    What were some of your influences at the time? On the band’s Skeletons in the Closet compilation and some of your B-sides, you draw from a really eclectic musical background. Did you have older siblings who turned you on to some music when you were growing up?

    My older sister, she introduced me to hard-rock ’80s stuff, so I grew up with bands like Motley Crue, WASP, Twisted Sister, and then later on, Guns N’ Roses, Skid Row. She would play the cassette for me, and I was like, ‘Holy fuck, this is awesome.’ The more she grew up, she got more into extreme stuff, and then all of a sudden, there’s Metallica, there’s Sepultura, there’s Slayer. Then I’m like, ‘Holy fuck.’ Then she bumps it up to death metal, and then it’s black metal.

    But the thing is, I never really abandoned any of my first influences or the first bands that I dug. That’s one thing about Children of Bodom’s music: You can hear a lot. For example, in the guitar riffs, there’s an ’80s vibe to them. And the keyboard sounds, there’s a lot of ’80s disco vibe going on in there. It’s a weird mix, but somehow I guess we made it work.




    [​IMG]

    Read More
    Guns N' Roses Announce Summer 2018 European Tour Dates

    Would you say the album after that, Hatebreeder, was the first one that got people paying more attention to the band?

    Yeah, I would say that less than a year-and-a-half between Something Wild and Hatebreeder, the band had taken such a huge leap forward, as far as everything. That’s when we started touring and playing live, and all of us, we were practicing like madmen. It was fuckin’ insane, dude. Every single day, we would practice as a band for hours and hours. And before and after, I would practice my own instrument. Our drummer, he would do the same thing. So Hatebreeder was obviously [better-played], and production-wise, it was a whole different band.

    Also, the songs, they had started making more sense. There was some sort of verse-chorus loop going on. Even though it was pretty progressive, but it wasn’t like one riff after another. The songs were actually a lot better, too.

    Did you categorize the band’s music as death metal? Have you moved beyond that category?

    I never even tried, dude. It’s just impossible. To me, it’s just metal. I just call it metal and that’s it. But some people call it black metal, some people call it death metal, some say it’s thrash, God knows what. There are millions of sub-categories and shit, and I’m not really that keen on labels. So you can call it whatever you want.

    What can you share about your third studio album, Follow the Reaper?

    We recorded that in Sweden, with Peter Tägtgren from Hypocrisy. And I think now, when I look back, maybe the songs, songwriting-wise, they had improved a lot. I do remember a lot of people were upset about the fact that the whole classical music vibe had been dialed back a lot. But a lot of people didn’t mind. I think it had a more rock’n’roll vibe in it. It was the first time we had kind of a slow song on the record, which was “Everytime I Die.” and that was one of those songs we still play live.

    How do you view the self-referential nature of singing about Lake Bodom or Children of Bodom, invoking it in your lyrics?

    It just accidentally became a routine — well, not a routine, but more like a tradition. On the first album, we had “Lake Bodom,” and then I figured, “OK, we're going to use the Reaper on the cover.” Originally, that wasn't planned. It just sort of happened. And then I made a promise to myself that on every single record, there was going to be at least one Bodom-related song. The cool thing about that is that since it is an unsolved crime, you can pretty much write anything you want about it. But they're more harsh to write. It's sort of like B horror movie style. So it's like they're half-comedy and half-horror.




    [​IMG]

    Read More
    Metallica Playing Hometown Benefit Show for Victims of California Wildfires

    That brings us to Hate Crew Deathroll. What did that album do for you?

    That was the album where we'd finally found our own path and our own style. Because up until then, we were kind of like going here and there. Sort of looking for what we're all about. And I think on Hate Crew, we had finally captured it … That's definitely one of not only the most important albums for Children of Bodom, but definitely one of the best. For a lot of people, it’s their favorite record of Children of Bodom — and I don't blame them. I don't mean to toot my own horn, but it is pretty fucking badass. When I look back and I listen to it, I'm like, “Shit, man. We nailed it.”

    You have an eclectic body of cover songs. I think the first one I ever heard was the Britney Spears cover, “Ooops!... I Did It Again.” Have you ever gotten feedback from artists that you've covered?

    Britney, no, unfortunately. I've always wanted her to hear it. I would just love to see her face. No, that hasn't happened yet. Through the grapevine, I did hear that Pat Benatar's guitar player, Neil Giraldo, heard the cover we did, "Hell Is for Children," and that he dug it or something. But it might just be a rumor. Same thing with Johnny Ramone. I heard that he heard the cover we did of “Somebody Put Something in My Drink” and he thought it was cool. But none of this was directly from the people, so it could be bullshit. But I choose to believe it because it makes me happy.
     
  4. (__Joonas__)

    (__Joonas__) † Followed the Reaper †

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    9,358
    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Finland
    What I find mystifying is since they 'discovered their style' or something with HCDR, why then did they make a totally different album next, if not for Alexi's wrist incident setting limitations to speed. Like suddenly they wanted something very different. Then only Blooddrunk has been sort of similar as in the combination of the intrinsic articulation to anger in the playing with the songwriting itself. I just think the best deal about this music isn't the raw anger, but the mysterious vibes and hideous song ideas, it has more adjectives than just primitive anger, all the parallels of it sort of. I understand what he means, but because HCDR was pretty one-dimensional in terms of vibe, it's not my favourite.
     
  5. sleeper666

    sleeper666 MetalMutha

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,503
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Suomi on mun kohtaloni
    Audio interview with Alexi

     
  6. (__Joonas__)

    (__Joonas__) † Followed the Reaper †

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    9,358
    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Finland
    Good interview, Alexi in the mood and the interviewer is insightful.

    What I still didn't get tho is why they didn't record the new album this fall like they intended? Did the Something Wild tour pull more people than anticipated, so they decided to continue it? Alexi's already regretting they didn't take it to the US...

    They already have 4-5 new songs done. Going to studio in March. Then it's that agonizing half year wait.
     
  7. IDontKnowWhatToWrite

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I think (hope) this "Something Wild Tour" has somehow opened their eyes on the fact that many people, even from the newer generations, still like their old stuff. I gave up hopes for them to go back to their roots, but I think they might have heeded our prayers and decided to maybe take time to "think the songs through" as they write them. Which would explain the huge setback, and also make it worth waiting =)
     
  8. ESA1996

    ESA1996 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,112
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Espoo, Finland
    I'm fairly sure that nearly the entire forum agrees with you. I certainly do. Even their comments about the old songs seem to have gone from something akin to "They are ridiculous guitar wankery" to "They are actually pretty good and fun to play".
     
  9. (__Joonas__)

    (__Joonas__) † Followed the Reaper †

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    9,358
    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Finland
    To be honest, they don't deserve our heated anticipation in the dawning of a new album anymore. Not after what happened the last three times. The good things they said about the last three albums sounded so promising and exciting, and it was an awful disappointment each time. Halo of Blood had some class, but even that one wore out in time, except for the title track. Sure they were good albums, but we expected best albums ever made. Even so, I still have faith this album could be more eerie, memorable and metal than the last ones.

    I'm not saying I Worship Chaos was lacking because of limited song sections and less technicality. I was the one who kept saying that's what they should try, because it worked for Hypocrisy, so logic said it would work for them. But I said sacrifice technicality and number of sections if that's what it takes to ensure the songs will be atmospheric. Because I thought RRF was not atmospheric because it focused too much on technicality. Then came IWC, and it had its magical moments, even some magical songs, but I sincerely thought it was gonna sound dark... and I didn't expect stripping off solos. Solos is one thing, it's unnecessary work to create a complex solo that serves no musical value. You can make unforgettable solo sections with much easier techniques, as long as the idea comes deep from the heart. Of course best solo is one that comes from the heart and is also technical wizardry.

    All I want is for the composions to come from the heart, for Alexi to imagine a magical song idea before picking up the guitar. To know the feeling of the song before touching the guitar. Then it's just about figuring the notes and seeing how the song actually looks like.

    Almost every song on the last three albums still has a moment that tells he still has that creativity. But to expand it until a song becomes the living breathing entity of its own, each with a very personal heartbeat. That's what made the best songs on Hatebreeder and Follow the Reaper exceptional.

    I believe Alexi when he said it would just sound forced if they intentionally tried to make something like one of the early albums. Creativity is much more important than soundworld.

    But when it comes to soundworld, I'd personally like more black metalish dark, atmospheric sound. I don't like the American sound or thrash metal in general. Such sound where they sound better with faster tempo, because it might be a way to provide the electrical feel by just increasing the speed and ensuring there's a strong mood in the songs.
     
    #4509 (__Joonas__), Dec 4, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2017
    COB-666 likes this.
  10. Sany

    Sany Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    709
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Germany
  11. (__Joonas__)

    (__Joonas__) † Followed the Reaper †

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    9,358
    Likes Received:
    37
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Finland
    Not sure if posted before.

     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Our music community has been around for almost 15 years and we pride ourselves on offering great metal music discussion, as well as music production and other closely related topics. We work hard every day to make sure our community is one of the best. Enjoy!
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Donate ♥

    We have worked hard for 15 years (and running) to make sure our Metal community is running fast, uses the best software, and isn't overloaded with advertising. If you love the forum as much as we love bringing it to you, please show your support with a generous donation. We really appreciate it!