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East vs. West

Discussion in 'General Metal Discussion' started by anonymousnick2001, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. no country for old wainds

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    Yes, I have a sort of morbid curiosity about this as well...
     
  2. The Devil's Steed

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    Lykathea Aflame have tryed something like that...
     
  3. anonymousnick2001

    anonymousnick2001 World's Greatest Vocalist

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    Actually, yes. Lykathea Aflame have also integrated an Eastern sound to their music so well, that the music just sounds eclectic as a whole in effect.

    Emphasis on the morbidity.
     
  4. Episteme

    Episteme Member

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    Lykathea Aflame are awesome.
     
  5. anonymousnick2001

    anonymousnick2001 World's Greatest Vocalist

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    Do they jive with what I'm saying?

    What nationality are they? Where are they situated?
     
  6. speed

    speed Member

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    This is a very interesting thread Nick.

    My take on it is: Do you think Eastern Music would ever have developed Metal on its own? I doubt it. Metal is too chaotic, unnatural, angry, bombastic, etc for both Eastern culture and tastes; it is too Western. Hence, I think your underlying question is impossible. No eastern band would or could ever develop metal without some influence, or knowledge of Western music. I dont see whats wrong with building upon what western bands have created; these Eastern bands can add their own unique touches, or even try to create a new form of metal, like Sepultura I think tried to do starting in Chaos AD.

    Now I do like the incorporation of eastern elements, especially Orphaned Land's first two records: Sahara, and EL Norra.
     
  7. andrew_plamondon

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    I'm not really good at musical theory and I naturally enjoy odd time signatures, so I can't really which band have those time signatures. Alchemist's album "Lunasphere" was very Arabic sounding though, I really liked that album, maybe there's something more about it that the melodies.
     
  8. The Devil's Steed

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    They're from Prague (Czech Republic), however, I don't know if that's their place of origin.

    Also, what'd you mean by it coming across as only being eclectic? That it's only electic when in most cases albums that attempt that are rather jarring, or something else?
     
  9. anonymousnick2001

    anonymousnick2001 World's Greatest Vocalist

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    I meant that it sounded eclectic instead of gimmicky. It's so easy to try to incorporate elements and have it come off as a gimmick rather than a seamless fusion.
     
  10. Burkhard

    Burkhard Active Member

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    It might not have developed metal on its own, but music from Mongolia might have developed death metal vocals. Actually, there´s one type of very deep traditional overtone/throat singing from that region which reminds of death metal vocals. A band which combined this kind of traditional throat singing with western rock music are Yat-Kha from Tuva (a part of the former USSR close to Mongolia). Samples can be found here.
    More traditional sounding are Egschiglen from Mongolia. Check out their song "Talhin Salhi", which you find here. (Some kind of "ethnic BnB"?)
    One of the most impressive songs featuring deep overtone vocals by Huun-Huur-Tu plus the female choir The Bulgarian Voices "Angelite" is - IMO - the acapella piece "Legend" from the album "Fly, Fly My Sadness". You can listen to a sample of this song on this site.
    Finally, if Angela Gossow came from Tuva or Mongolia, her vocals might sound a bit like those of Sainkho Namtchylak on her song "From Me To You" (from her album "Naked Spirit") - sorry, no link to this song available. (It should be added that Sainkho Namtchylak has a much wider vocal range than Angela and I think she does this deep overtone vocals only on the song I just mentioned).
     
  11. jazzdj

    jazzdj New Metal Member

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    Interesting thread, and great question/topic, Nick. Wish I could add something more to the original intent but I'm just starting to explore this myself, having a big interest in metal and various world musics. I got turned on to Orphaned Land and Melechesh thanks to a previous thread on metal with Middle Eastern influences. (Thanks to the missing search function!)

    The post about Tuvan throat singing having a resemblance to death metal growls was a great example of ways different cultures can develop something similar, but in a totally different way and feel. To take this back in the direction of mixing Western music with it (although blues not metal, but since blues begat metal maybe one day...), if you are interested in this stuff, check out American blues guitarist Paul Pena, who taught himself the Tuvan singing style and with help from the Friends of Tuva organization (founded by legendary physicist Richard Feynman and his friend Ralph Leighton), traveled to Mongolia and won a singing competition. I highly recommend checking out the movie Genghis Blues and its accompanying soundtrack. Note for those unfamiliar with this music: if you check out some samples, the high pitched whistling sound is Pena using one of the 5 Tuvan singing styles.
     
  12. The Devil's Steed

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    Very true.
     
  13. anonymousnick2001

    anonymousnick2001 World's Greatest Vocalist

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    That's fucking ridiculous. I'm checking that out.
     
  14. Mormagil

    Mormagil bring back the corvee

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    Throat singing is awesome.
     
  15. Episteme

    Episteme Member

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    The vocalist in my band manages to pull a Tibetan monk chanting thing that he uses in some of our songs. It's really deep.
     
  16. metal devi

    metal devi Member

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    That can't be very easy to do...
     
  17. anonymousnick2001

    anonymousnick2001 World's Greatest Vocalist

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    Tibetan monk chanting thing? Please describe this further!
     
  18. Episteme

    Episteme Member

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    http://www.mp3.com/gyuto-monks-tantric-choir/artists/9806/summary.html

    Check this website out, it might be of some help and you'll get to sample a few clips. It's basically this really deep form of growling that a sect of Tibetan monks called Gyuto do as a form of choir. Basically, the monks are able to do really guttural chants that are multi toned. Which means more than 1 note is able to be projected from their voices. My vocalist is only able to hit 2 notes so it's not as good as the real thing, plus it would sound alot cooler if there were more than 1 person chanting so the sounds would be harmonized. It's really interesting stuff.
     
  19. Christie_fell

    Christie_fell Oh, the pain.

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    The Native Alaskans have a form of throat singing where they mimick the sound of wildlife and animals. Pretty damn interesting stuff when you hear it.
     
  20. anonymousnick2001

    anonymousnick2001 World's Greatest Vocalist

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    It would be great if bands would try more of this. I would with my band, but we're not deft songwriters, and we have certain closed-minded entities among us which prevent such experimental elements from being explored to fruition. A damn shame, really.

    I'm checking out the samples.
     

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