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Getting Clients?

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by Pete The Elite, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. 006

    006 Member

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    I didn't read what the post was that brought on the "NO DRUGS." reply, but I smoke quite a bit during nearly every session :)

    And I would like to also say that unless you are big league, you won't be working with bands you really like, unless you don't want to make money. To make money doing this you need to learn how to do more than one genre, even if you don't like it because there won't always be a badass fucking death metal band for you to record. Or whatever you are into...

    ~006
     
  2. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    +1

    Working with bands you like 100% of the time is an idealistic pipe dream. Even guys at the top take shit work because it pays well. You have to draw a compromise between eating and personal integrity at some point. Eating wins every time, trust me.
     
  3. brandy

    brandy Iguana Hell

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    If you are professional enough you are able to "like" any kind of band/music/shit while you are recording/producing/mixing it.

    Every single production is - while you are working on it - the most important session on earth.

    Even if it is the shitty demo of a shitty ska-band or the local church choir.

    For them it is something important - they spent money for recording a CD (even if it is just 500 bucks, this is very very little in a professional scenario but for THEM it might be a lot).

    Additional to that it can't hurt to have some experience in other kinds of music. It is interesting how similar and different at the same time a recording session with for example a classical trio (concert-grand, cello, violine) can be...

    Also Machinated said:

    Exactly that was how I did and do it here.

    First I did my own bands, then bands of friends. Working my ass of to create someting cool. I remember that I remixed my first album of my own band 5 or even more times up from scratch because I was not 100% happy.
     
  4. vespiz

    vespiz Mixing!

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    I hear you.. :(

    It's mostly been my own band & projects plus a few bands that are good friends of ours. So far, only a few "outside"-sessions for me, much more for my partner. (Because I'm working full-time at a shop, is why). We're building a rep for ourselves slowly, but steadily and word of mouth is the most powerful marketing tool at this point. Get as many cds out there with your name on! :)

    Oh yeah, and make it sound good! All the reputation in the world is nothing, unless you have something to back it up with...
     
  5. broken81

    broken81 Used by Protools

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    Simple answer....

    Do good work and they will find you!

    Until you can do good work or even decent work, start begging bands to let you record them for free or at a really stupid cheap price. I know this has been said already but it needs to be said again!!

    Good luck
     
  6. -Noodles-

    -Noodles- 3 Initals Mixer

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    I've only ever done work with bands that I think they've got good songs for their style.

    I've yet to make any money on my recordings, but I've got a better portfolio than most guys I know - and my name is far stronger than them. People just don't know how to get ahold of me!
    Hopefully my project for honours at uni [http://studio-diaries.blogspot.com/] will appeal to a lot of genres, and it'll be a product that people will buy - and my details will be all over it.
     
  7. 006

    006 Member

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    I still stand that you won't always work with bands you genuinely enjoy unless you don't care about making money. That's the kicker. To make money doing it, you have to be open to whatever comes to your door. It's a hard thing to come to terms with, but this business is not lucrative unless you go with it.

    ~006
     
  8. brandy

    brandy Iguana Hell

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    Well, but when you only do the stuff you really like (assuming you are at the beginning of your career and without truckloads of experience) you probably will not get enough training and experience when you just do some candy sessions here and there...
     
  9. Machinated

    Machinated Member

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    I'm happy to work with anything (I do all kinds of genre's) - really I think of it similarly: whatever genre it is I want the songs to be as good as possible. If anything I like doing genre's that I'm not used to as its something new and different for me to work on, instead of stuff I'm always working on. Definitely keeps my mind fresh going back and forth between different styles!
     
  10. 006

    006 Member

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    +1,000,000,000,000,000

    I usually get death, grind and black metal bands coming in. Current project booked is a rock band. Rock was a realllly nice break for me and even though the music was kinda amateur and the singing is awful, I still had a little fun doing it and am digging how it comes out. Keeps you on your toes, as they say :)

    ~006
     
  11. digitaldeath

    digitaldeath Member

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    True story: Mate of mine got a call while I was around...
    "Yea, wassup! I'm a rapper an' I wanna make a CD with ya!"
    "Er okay, do you have music, beats etc.?"
    "Isn't that yer job!"
    "I think you've got the wrong number..." and hung up! Lol! We laughed for ages!
     
  12. coldthrn

    coldthrn Chris Cauthen

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    Thats happened to me as well. LOL
     
  13. brandy

    brandy Iguana Hell

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    2 or 3 times here as well. Usually they are at the door.

    I usually tell them that I am 340 EUR/day, that I have no music/beats/stuff and then I send them to a competitor :headbang:
     
  14. Erik Monsonis

    Erik Monsonis Member

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    Nice advices here, ty ^^

    I started doing my own band, then mixing some bedroom projects, then recording a friend band, and some days ago I got a call from a local label to mix 2 albums :D
    I think i've been pretty lucky on that, but anyways, they pay shit...

    I don't know how is it outside my country, but here people is in the trendy that gear=quality. You are what you have... So no big deals for the people like me :(

    Now i've started working on a local recording studio, i do all the metal bands for them, and they pay me shit, but my name is on the records, so enough for me at the moment.

    Oh, and I've never spammed Myspace, and won't.

    Cheers!!
     
  15. GuitarMaestro

    GuitarMaestro Member

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    I guess especially in the beginning it is better to NOT take every job. Because a shitty band will never result in a great sounding record that establishes your name. I prefer to practise on everything I get and only accept jobs if I know I can get something out of it that is sounding good enough for my standards. Who will come to you if they know "the shitty sounding album by band xyz" was done by that guy? Many musicians not that involved in mixing/mastering cannot easily distinguish between a good mix on a horrible band and a horrible mix...
     
  16. Erik Monsonis

    Erik Monsonis Member

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    Yep, agree on that.
     
  17. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    I actually asked Mark Opitz a very similar question.

    'Is it more important to shoot for quality or quantity early in the career?'

    He took a while to consider the question and told me to work with as much stuff as I possibly could, as the world at that point isn't waiting on you to do anything. You have to get out there, and the best way is to just send records flying left right and center. So what if some of them are shit? People will generally judge their willingness to work with you off your best records, or at least the ones that they themselves hear. You have more chance if you have 10 records out there, even if 5 of them are shit, rather than just 5. Sometimes having your name on a lot of stuff is enough to get people working with you, regardless of ability. Remember, people work based on trends and current cultures.

    It's some of my worst work that has got me clients in the past, not my best. My best, ironically never got released.
     
  18. brandy

    brandy Iguana Hell

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    EXTREEMLY good point.

    Extreemly good point as well...

    That are two philosophies which I reflected a lot during the years.

    The point is: It is such a difference when you compare the album of a good band with 10.000 bucks of budget to a demo of a local kids-band which was done for 300 bucks. And someone who has no insight about the background of these albums could easily check out just the demo and then he/she knows: Damn, that Iguana Studios sucks big time.

    But what I did in the past:

    If you even try very hard to get a decent result with that 300 bucks demo as well as the band knows for sure that you worked your ass of (of course in the context of the budget) than this can compensate a lot. Because they tell others.
     
  19. Pete The Elite

    Pete The Elite Pete The Elite

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    Wow cheers for all the reply's, have managed to get a band booked this weekend for a small price :), jus gonna keep building on it!

    Obviously as you guys said the quality of your mixes matters, ive done a few mixes if any1 has time to check them out and see what you think that'd be great.

    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=908940

    Pete
     
  20. jrt12

    jrt12 Member

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    just wanted to chime in from a diff perspective... i'm an artist whose looked and looked for "right" person to produce my stuff. i'm on sites like this to learn more about the recording process, not to be a producer, but so that i can do better demos on my own, till i'm ready to get them finished. plus, this knowledge of knowing what's possible and what the "best practices" are better prepares me as an artist. at least i think so...

    anyways, here's what i look for when i'm searching:

    1. smaller bands (not major label) whose production jumps out at me. i then try and look up who did their tracks and see if i can find them from there

    2. craigslist and myspace: yes, its a hassle getting spam from some guys, but its also a great resource. I've actually found established "pro" producers once in a while on craigslist looking to fill up their downtime. i still couldnt afford them, even at their "discount" prices which averaged around $2K per track. and myspace is a no brainer, but unfortunately everyone and their mother is a "producer" these days.

    3. and to me this was most impt... samples of your work! you wouldnt believe how many producer ads or studio sites i've come across without any song samples. i dont even waste my time responding or contacting those.

    4. this is my subjective take: i wanna see diversity in work. i wont go with someone who's done only metal, or only "insert random"-core tracks. i think a broader portfolio brings a broader perspective to the project. but then again, i'm not a metal project, i just have elements in it. but i think the more skills they have with diff genres means theyre gonna bring alot more insight/experience to the table.


    so... for those who are looking for ways to get their names out there, and who arent being "found", i would suggest this:

    1. try negotiating with clients whose projects youre really proud of, to do mutually beneficial advertising for each other. ie - put each others banners on your pages/signatures for XX number of months or whatever.

    2. give them a "discount" on your mixing/mastering or whatever fees if they put your contact info on their cd insert. even just your name/studio name and website is all. this is only if thats not already a part of your contract/verbal agreements, etc. and the discount is in quotes because only you will know if you actually gave them one ;)

    3. a little sleazier, or more used car salesman-y. but whatever, we are talking marketing/business here! once you recognize the "talent(s)" in the group your recording, stroke their ego and ask them about their other/side projects. encourage them to "pursue" these other projects and make an appt outside of the booked studio time to check it out

    anways... not sure if this is blatantly obvious or not, but i've not come across these very much (if at all).
     

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