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I am using Hybrit and loving it - Questions

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by BattleTits, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. BattleTits

    BattleTits Member

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    Before I ask questions..my chain :

    Gibson Les Paul Studio into active EWI DI into Joe Meek 3q into Cubase with TS808 sim (volume 10, tone 5, gain 1)and then into Hybrit full stack.

    first thing is that I am really into the double micing aspect that you can do with this sim. It is as close to real as I have seen since most guys I know double mic their cabs.

    I am currently using the Marshall 1969 impluses. They have a ton of options...too many to be honest, i may go insane. I am messing with an SM57 2 inches off the edge of the cone and a 421 4 inches off the cap. My first question is do you get phasing if you have 1 mic off axis and one on? Because I see the option for some off axis settings as well. My second is simply other cool suggestions for micing a marshall cab that I can try. I am going for a clutch meets classic rock distorted tone and so far it is working out alright.

    the main question..what is the best way to setup the session? I could use a stereo track for 1 instance of hybrit, then in the vst, pan the impulses hard right and hard left. It sounds nice in my monitors, but I am trying to figure out the best way to mix. Do you leave those 2 mic impulse tones hard panned stereo (in hybrit) and then double track with another stereo track set up the same way? Or do you somehow get both mics on one side and then double track again for the other side?

    I am used to mono tracking. So what I did last night was set up a mono channel and put hyrbit in. I set it on mono and kept both impulses panned middle. I then panned the track in Cubase hard left and recorded. I made a new mono channel in the same settings, recorded again and hard panned right. The resulting sound is very good, but I am curious what the most ideal way to do this is. I know there are probably no rules, but I think there may be just because phasing can always be an issue and I want to know how to avoid that.

    Hopefully this makes sense and someone can chime in on how they do it.

    As for sound, I am using the jcm with everything around 12 and overdrive off. It gives a real nice and glassy distortion that is heavy enough to riff out and sound classic, but is still big once you double track, and not too high endy.
     
  2. B36arin

    B36arin Member

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    I usually don't double mic, but from what I've understood the reason for doing it so to get desirable phase effects between the two microphones. If you pan both microphones hard to each side, you won't get that effect. It can widen the stereo image of a single track, but I personally wouldn't do it when you are double tracking the guitar anyway.

    My two cents are to add both tracks in mono and then pan them afterwards, but try the different possibilities for yourself and decide which solution you like most!
     
  3. BattleTits

    BattleTits Member

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    Cool..you think like me then. so far it works, I just started second guessing myself and made the thread.

    The new thing for me to try is if both mics should be the same distance with maybe one off axis and one on. That is pretty easy to mess with and find out by swapping out IRs. Also trying some volume adjustments where 1 IR is not as loud as the other.
     

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