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Industrial/gothic guitar tone?

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by Thared33, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. Jind

    Jind Grrrr!!! (I'm a bear)

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    I have a Zoom 505 sitting in a drawer next to me - I don't think it's been powered up in over 15 years - it's an original one, not the 505II that came out later on. I'm not even sure where the wall wart power supply for it is. Was a fun little device for it's time.
     
  2. Exocaster

    Exocaster Nozzle

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    Seeing as this is what I play... This is pretty accurate. There's lots of distortion or fuzz direct-into-the-board tones, distortion from odd sources, usually fairly unconventional means of getting unique tones.

    The dirty guitar at the end of this demo, for example- Strat with single coils into a Voodoo Lab Sparkle Drive into a Digitech Synth Wah set to a nasty fuzz sound into a Crybaby 95Q with the boost engaged and cranked into a Mesa Stiletto- four distortion sources in a row.

    Or here I'm using an SD-1 into a Pod into a distorted DI on a mic pre and part of it into a bitcrusher.

    Some of the genre's more metal-ish acts can have comparatively conventional heavy guitar tones, but they're the exception to the rule, and even then, something like Ministry or KMFDM's usual guitar tones wouldn't pass muster for most modern metal.
     
  3. espartaco

    espartaco espartaco

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    guitar rig is just perfect for this kinds of tones.
     
  4. Sp3c14LK

    Sp3c14LK New Metal Member

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    I've been on your quest before and there's no easy answer. Basically the tone your shooting for, is the sound of the old cheap 80s/90s casio keyboard 'Distorted Guitar' patch. In NIN early albums he was quoted as saying "We started with a real tight/heavy 'Pantera' tone, then ran it through both hardware and software eqs and amp modelers until we had something that sounded digital and electronic" He also used/still uses, a lot of Zoom multieffects, simply because they were cheaper and easier for him to acquire on his then budget. The BOSS metal zone will always be the most versatile stand alone dist pedal, imo. But, alas, I've long since graduated to the epic distortion of tube amps.
    That being said about the recording end of it, you wanna know where to go w your live rig...
    Well, after having seen more than a few Darkwave and Industrial bands live and being a guitarist of 16 years I've noticed two typical setups.
    1)Amp Stack - (My personal choice) Most the bands that have that 'digital fuzz' on their records actually have a live 'MESA/Marshall' sound that would make Joe Satriani proud. This includes Marylin Manson, Razed in Black, KMFDM, Pig, Front Line Assembly, Ministry, etc.
    In my rack, I have two 31 band eqs in the effects loop (Laney VH100R All Tube Pre and Post Amps) that I can toggle with an A/B switch, one tuned for that digital fuzz, the other for a tighter more bottom-end punch.
    I dont even use dist pedals anymore, it's really about the eq. You're on the right track w a 31 band, cuz you can get that huge mid scooped guitar sound and still bring in specific mid freqeuncies to create a well produced or mangled digital fuzz sound without ever touching a peice of recording hardware or Zoom pedal.
    Also, different speaker sizes help, I run 2x12 and 1x15. Though 2x12 and 2x10 sounds great, as well as 2x10 and 1x15, allowing you to hear and tune/eq more frequencies than your typical 12 inch cab setup.
    Then, there's typical live rig #
    2) Using the PA system as your power amp and speakers for a more 'home stereo' and hence, thinner, more digital/electronic sound, live. Rather than a really loud or mic'd amp. This is usually done by going from the guitar into dist pedal, then rackmount preamp or high gain amp head, then eq(s), then line out to PA.
    Always remember there's no right or wrong when it comes to tones and FX. *Experiment!* Try one of those setups i described above or variations of both, like have your amp and cab(s) dialed in for a tight sound and mic the cab or line out to an eq and/or PA with totally different settings. Keep reading threads and guitar magazine interviews, you'll get there! ^_^
     
  5. jangoux

    jangoux Member

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    there's a zvex pedal that sound like a buzz-saw when used with guitar...the wolly mammoth..it sounds very buzzy / synth-y , so it might fit the bill
     
  6. Rupturemetal

    Rupturemetal I am rape-I am hate

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    I thought part of the "Ministry" sound was playing through blown speakers. I read that somewhere .
     
  7. LukeJonGibson

    LukeJonGibson New Metal Member

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    "Industrial rock/metal and "sold that many records" don't really fit into the same sentence :lol: There's only a handful of bands that have sold more than about 1000 - 5000 copies of each album world wide."

    Really?

    Pitchshifter
    Ramstein
    Fear Factory
    Ministry
    Spineshank
    Static X
    White Zombie
    Powerman 5000
    Crossfaith
    The Union Underground
    Just to name a few off the top of my head.

    In fact Linkin Park although they get lumped as Nu Metal, they're actually got a very Industrial rock sound and they're probably in the top 10-20 biggest bands of all time with over 100 million units sold worldwide.
     

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