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Laurel or Yanny

Discussion in 'Musicians Discussion' started by MaverickStang, May 19, 2018.

  1. MaverickStang

    MaverickStang Member

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    Yes I know this stupid thing on the internet! What it really boils down to is that it is laurel, because it's the exact one from vocabulary.com! The vocabulary.com gives "laurel", which I think it's hilarious for yanny! Seriously those monkeys from vocabulary.com are making it worse! Anyways by fascination I find it odd that at low pitched 4 whole steps down, I start to hear yetti, yelli, or relli more. At normal I do hear a yetti or yanni or whatever as noise only still, but mostly hear laurel. So people hearing yanni or whatever are only hearing low frequencies. So really how well are your ears?


    I stop around 19,860 or basically all.

    https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/yanny
    https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/laurel

    Yanny https://www.google.com/search?q=google translate&oq=goo&aqs=chrome.0.69i59l2j69i57j69i60l2j0.2873j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
     
    #1 MaverickStang, May 19, 2018
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
  2. MaverickStang

    MaverickStang Member

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    The only reason to why I made this forum thread is because of the fascination of lower pitching by 4 whole steps down, I start to hear yetti or whatever. Could this internet hype help make our mixes be OMG atmosphere!? That's what I was coming down to.
     
    #2 MaverickStang, May 19, 2018
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
  3. Bloopy

    Bloopy Active Member

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    Already discussed here by the way: http://www.ultimatemetal.com/forum/posts/11587074/

    I hear yanny and I've lost a bit of the high frequencies (different YouTube tests give me different results and my speakers have a bit of background static, which doesn't help). However, using this as an explanation doesn't make sense as "yanny" is in the higher frequencies, while "laurel" is in the lower.

    If I use earbuds, I can hear both on this without using the slider, whereas my PC speakers have a separate subwoofer so that could partly explain why my main speakers put me strongly in "yanny" territory.
     
  4. MaverickStang

    MaverickStang Member

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    Being 30, sadly Graphic Design work is rather tight these days, and getting any experience is just quite slow at the moment. I got some experience, about 1 & 1/2 years equivalent; yeah that hard to get experience. My older sister is divorced so, she lives with my parents too. I'm just telling you that, I still live with my family, it's my environment, the people I'm with, and I'm the only one in my family that can hear a stupid bird in a weird chirping pattern in the mornings! Wish I could kill it, but you know I can't kill a mockingbird in my state.

    People have better listening in the low frequency ranges. Not to brag, but during my childhood at my elementary school, I was given tests of low to high frequencies. People were amazed I heard high frequencies more than most! I think it's just a gift of mine. I'm one of those people that wake up right on the first drop of rain.

    It's all got to do with the frequency. So people hearing yanni or whatever are only hearing low frequencies? Did I confuse myself? Nope.

    As we get older, we tend to start losing our hearing at higher frequency ranges, not lower frequencies.

    What I do know is that by changing the word to a lower frequency, yanny is mostly heard.

    People can't hear laurel because laurel is higher frequency and yanny is lower frequency. People hear the lower yanny, because everything fades out. The fact of the matter is really people can't hear laurel because it's higher frequency.

    High to low to High again (Just to make sure you're not crazy)


    However, I do bet that most here hear both, but laurel is dominant. As you stated from earbuds.

    Experiments have shown that a healthy young person hears all sound frequencies from approximately 20 to 20,000 hertz

    People that hear yanny are ignoring the loud sound of higher frequencies so it fades out.

    If I can hear splashing water in the clouds like waves, when it rains, I know I'm not deaf!

    Also it can be how crappy your old speakers are too.

    The best way to explain this that my Dad can't hear the high frequency air-trap noise from the refrigerator and I can.

    So it would be true to add more bass, rather than treble. Too much treble adds a hiss. Now it makes sense to why it does that when mixing.

    There's probably a reason to why I don't like standard e, it hurts my ears. So I settled to play lower and besides I do like lower :headbang:
     
    #4 MaverickStang, May 20, 2018
    Last edited: May 20, 2018
  5. Bloopy

    Bloopy Active Member

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    No, you have it backwards. Like I said, yanny is higher frequency and laurel is lower frequency. Some people are reporting their kids hearing yanny, while they themselves hear laurel. So it probably has way more to do with speakers:

     
  6. MaverickStang

    MaverickStang Member

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    Ok so why do I hear BOTH? Really the word is 'laurel' being spoken by modulation is from vocabulary.com. It has been confirmed that it's really LAUREL! It can't be yanny! So why do some hear only yanny and not laurel? That's what I'm trying to figure out. There can't be a reason to hear yanny mostly when really laurel is present as the actual word from the site I mentioned! That's why I described yanny in lower frequencies, because those people are hearing the noise only at the end, and don't hear the higher frequencies sounds in the beginning; just the left overs. By poll, people are hearing laurel mostly, and only 17% hear both; I'm the 17%.

    I can't believe that people would actually ignore laurel, when that's the actual word from the site I mentioned! That is what is really puzzling me!

    People ignoring the word laurel is rather odd for me!

    If I hear both, I'm actually glad that I hear both! I'm glad that Bloopy hears both with earbuds! Still I hear laurel as mostly dominant. I don't know why some can't hear both? Unless yanny is so high that people can't hear laurel? Don't tell me that people have beyond super hearing that they ignore laurel! So please. No offense, it's like you're really that super human to ignore laurel, so NO!

    If I lower the frequency of laurel, I get yanny and if I higher the frequency of laurel, I get alvin and the chipmunks of laurel. Getting rid of the higher frequencies makes the yanny sound become more dominant. Meaning removing the frequencies that say laurel. So people only hear the end part of the noise feedback with hearing yanny. Some people can't hear both, which means they have lower frequency loss, which is a thing. Too much lower the frequency, I get a lion's growl.

    What I'm trying to state to people is that people that hear both have great range of hearing!

    I just can't get over the fact that people hear yanny more than laurel, when it's LAUREL! I mean really?! Gosh I hate the internet at times! It's like they want it to be yanny!

    Again to make it more sense people are hearing the noise only at the end and don't hear the higher frequencies sounds in the beginning; just the left overs.

    The voiced speech of a typical adult male will have a fundamental frequency from 85 to 180 Hz, and that of a typical adult female from 165 to 255 Hz.

    The energy range of sonic boom is concentrated in the 0.1–100 hertz. So anyone can still hear the bass boom from the jet, even when part deaf in the ears.

    Low pitch frequencies travel farther because they have a "wider and lower", thus the reason to hear the wide spectrum of yanny, as wavelength as opposed to a high frequency wave length that is "thinner and taller" with laurel.

    No one has beyond super human hearing to just hear yanny!
     
    #6 MaverickStang, May 21, 2018
    Last edited: May 21, 2018

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