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Lynch Mob's Wicked Sensation?

Discussion in 'Neil Kernon - Auslander' started by SausageofPower, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. SausageofPower

    SausageofPower New Metal Member

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    Hey Neil,

    I was reading a few interviews of yours, and came across this:

    "Once I didn’t finish a project as there was pretty much a total creative halt. This was the first Lynch Mob album. The new singer as it turned out, on the demos, was in a chemically altered state. But as a result of a couple of DUIs, he was unable to partake in that sort of entertainment. Without his chemical high, he wasn’t able to sing like on the demos and the vocals came out flat and boring. It was really heartrending to not be able to get a performance out of him and to decide to walk away."

    I was hoping you could expand upon this experience? I know Oni Logan has a colorful history, as fans of Lynch Mob are painfully aware. How much time did you spend on the record? How far did you guys get? Are any of the songs you tracked on the final version of the album? Any information you'd like to share would be great.

    Thanks!
     
  2. SausageofPower

    SausageofPower New Metal Member

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    Damn, no reply? Too bad. Oh well, thanks anyway. I love your work Neil, glad I found this forum!
     
  3. NK

    NK Complete Bastard

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    I worked on the record for 3-4 months, from pre-pro through all the rhythm tracks and also the lead guitar tracking.

    I did some work with Oni on vocals, as did Max. Unfortunately, none of the vocals had the same intensity that the demo vocals had, so rather than continue to beat a dead horse, and keep spending a fortune in recording time, we made the difficult decision to import the vocals from all the demos into the album.

    It sounds like it would be an easy feat - actually, these days something like this would be a breeze to do - but there were three sets of demos - some songs were on 8 track analogue, some on 16 track analogue, and some on 24 track digital, all at different tempos (with no click tracks) and all in slightly differing tunings.

    So, Max and I spent over a week painstakingly flying the vocals in line by line, using a combination of varispeed and harmoniser to get the old vocals both in time and in tune with the new track, transferring the manipulated vocal to an early Atari ADAP digital recorder, and then trying to get it all in sync with the master. It took over a day per lead vocal.

    At that point, probably about halfway through this process, as there was only one computer (which was Max's) there was really nothing left for me to do, I sadly had to make the decision to leave the project. I gave the remainder of my fee to Max (we were co-producing the record) as he would still have to spend a lot more time fixing all the vocal mess. Even though I had co - produced the record from the beginning, my production / engineering credit was reduced to something like "additional engineering" because I left.
     

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