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Now Reading Thread

Discussion in 'The Philosopher' started by derbeder, Dec 24, 2006.

  1. derek

    derek Grey Eminence

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    I think better later on is perhaps the wrong way to look at it. I'd thoroughly recommend reading the entire book and then seeing how you feel then.

    It's a strange one, but I think you need to attempt to understand your criticisms as a required response to the text. The critical work on this is legion, so I'd say finsish the book, mull it over and maybe dip into some of the secondary literature afterwards.
     
  2. MannequinLimbs

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    Appearance and Reality - P.M.S Hacker.
     
  3. kmik

    kmik Member

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    Well Mann is clearly an intellectual and the work is of at least some philosophical value, so there's no wonder he's approved of by the critics. It's just that if you don't enjoy this work at the "analytic" level (understanding of symbols, all this philosophizing about time) then there's nothing left to enjoy. Maybe I'll return to it one day
     
  4. Justin S.

    Justin S. Member

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    Parmenides' Fragments

    Parmenides - Plato

    Parmenides - Heidegger
     
  5. speed

    speed Member

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    Saint Augustine's Confessions

    David Sedaris Me Talk Pretty One Day

    John Banville The Sea
     
  6. speed

    speed Member

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    I;m also not a fan of Mann. I tried Buddenbrooks and Doctor Faustus. Both were torture to read, and I skimmed over most of Doctor Faustus (which was sort of about Schoenberg).
     
  7. kmik

    kmik Member

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    Good to know. I've also finished reading the first volume of Proust, and it is absolutely amazing: probably the best prose I've ever read and really one of the greatest works of fiction.
     
  8. speed

    speed Member

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    Ive been saving him for a long time. Its such a daunting task--not only in sheer weight and poundage, but intellectually--to pick up such a series. It doesnt help that I ve read so much about it, that I already know what its about, etc.

    St Augustine's Confessions was quite good. I really must make a thread on his conception of time. He was an excellent writer, even if one doesnt agree with him. I always hled a belief the ancients--Seneca, Cicero, Plato, Quintillian, etc--were such excellent writers and Christians like St Augustine and Tertullian mucked things up stylistically and intellectually; but truly, I have reconsidered this opinion after reading St. Augustine.
     
  9. kmik

    kmik Member

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    Ah, Proust is pure pleasure. In his writing, he's in the tradition of Stendhal and Tolstoy: very elegant, clean, psychological, a pleasure to read (really unlike, say, Dostoevsky, where drunk Russians start philosophizing about God for two pages and everything is somewhat "rushed"). His characterization is so great - even minor characters, his hypocrite bourgeoisie is so much funnier than everything else. Generally more sublime, more observing - he digs deeper even than the things that nmost novelists don't even touch; and his philosophy is fascinating, well put in his novel.

    I think the books stand on their own. Swann in Love at least you can read separately, you might lose something but it's great. At some points Proust can get "boring" (in retrospect, I think not at all, but there is great attention to details), but this is literature of the first rate and once you get into it you can't be in any doubt about that
     
  10. waif

    waif Member

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    the life of pi
     
  11. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    For class: The Memoirs of Marshal Zhukov

    For fun: The Darkness That Comes Before: Book One of the Prince of Nothing Trilogy by R. Scott Bakker (really good, dark, philosophical read)
     
  12. speed

    speed Member

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  13. panzerfaust666

    panzerfaust666 German Asshole

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    Cormac McCarthy-The Road
    Nietzsche-Twilight of the Idols, the Antichrist
    Michel Focault-History of madness
     
  14. Resurrect

    Resurrect Member

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    At the moment i'm reading 'The Subtle Knife' by Philip Pullman, and i'm almost at the end, but I haven't sat down and read properly for a bit now, unfortunately, luckily I have the next book in the series for when I finish this one.
     
  15. WeAreTheLastMen

    WeAreTheLastMen Metacom

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    That whole trilogy is amazing. I read them when I was in fifth grade (maybe sixth). I just picked them up and realized that they're just as brilliant now.
     
  16. kmik

    kmik Member

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    So I decided to give Moby Dick another take... It's hard enough with the English but if someone finished it - exactly how much it digresses ?
     
  17. speed

    speed Member

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    Hm, I've never read it, and probably never will.

    I really enjoyed reading The Book of Laughter and Forgetting by Milan Kundera. A rare obvious book of philosophy/ literature that I think worked quite well, and didnt come off as forced or pretentious.
     
  18. Demiurge

    Demiurge This user has no title

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    Relevance Logic and Entailment by Dunn and Restall

    It is fair to say that I have become obsessed with formal logic and rarely read about anything else unless I must.
     
  19. Justin S.

    Justin S. Member

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    Petersburg - Bely

    The Truth in Painting - Derrida
     
  20. Demiurge

    Demiurge This user has no title

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    Anyone else have a strong interest in logic?
     

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