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random question to people who record and keep snare tracks

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by joeymusicguy, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. MetalSound

    MetalSound Member

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    normally i don´t notch that radical. most of the time i only like to add some highs but it´s nearly always impossible because of too much bleed from the hi-hat.
    after gating the snare it always sounds like shit.
    so i nearly always replace snare 100% (at least in metal).
     
  2. colonel kurtz

    colonel kurtz Member

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    +1000

    i almost always mic the bottom of the snare to really get the sound i want out of it...and any time i don't, i end up wishing i did

    i5 on top + AT 4033 on bottom = :headbang:
     
  3. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    Snare bottom mic is a necessity. If you only have top, and you crank enough high end and high mids for the snare to actually cut through the mix, you'll find you've just boosted the hi-hat level by like 6dB in the mix. Hi-hat bleed is the biggest killer on raw snare tracks, and the more high boosting you have to do, the more screwed you end up being.

    I find similar issues with raw snares. It's definitely the drum most prone to some really drastic EQ. I'd say go with what works. -18dB maximum narrow cuts seem a little excessive to me, but I guess it depends what you want from the snare. If you really hate ring, you'd be best off using a muting ring or moon gels to kill it acoustically. In a larger drum room a lot more of the tone can be had from the overheads and room mics, rather than relying on the snare ringing within itself.

    If you find the magic ticket though, please share. Raw snare is one of the hardest elements to get right for me, and I've only ever once in my life kept a snare track 100% raw on a finished production, and that was because it was a sparse, prog arrangement rather than a busy metal thing. It may be in the nature of the beast that we rely on samples to augment our tracks, and give them the intensity they need.
     
  4. CatharsisStudios

    CatharsisStudios trcksngsrpbngs

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    stereo room mics. thats how its helped me deal with my snares, but no joey it doesn't sound to bad just sounds like you need a bottom mic in there, and dampening and a bit of tuning
     
  5. John_C

    John_C formerly Skeksis268

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    Snare is the drum that benefits most from room mics. Next time I'm recording some drums i'm gonna mess around with a shotgun mic somewhere in the room pointed at the snare and see what I get.
     
  6. GarethSE

    GarethSE New Metal Member

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    raw snare sounded fine to me.
    sounded like, yknow, a snare drum.
     
  7. gabriel g.

    gabriel g. Member

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    +1
    and smash that fuckers with a great comp (short attack, medium release big ratio)
    magic will happen:)
     
  8. greyskull

    greyskull Member

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    ahhhhhhhh ringy snare is ringy.
    evans hd dry on the snare. tune it properly; stick moongel on it. bosh.
     
  9. MetalJonesy

    MetalJonesy more metal, more booze!!!

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    I find myself doing the same Joey!! even to the slate stuff alot of the times, just to fit it in with the rest of my mix, i dunno, just how i work i guess, sometimes its very minimal maybe a roll off, a cpl of small cuts and a small amount of dB in the top end. again, like you said, if it ends up sounding good, then why stop.

    Like alot of the guys have mentioned above, getting the snare sounding right under the mic first is paramount.
     
  10. Let it burn...

    Let it burn... Orgasm Donor

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    yeah take some time tuning the drums, selecting the right mic for snare top etc.. An SM57 is a safe choice but very often there is a mic that will sound better.

    Most of my snare EQ-ing is just a corrective EQ, like the logic channel EQ or digirack stuff, to do a high-pass and to reduce some unwanted ring. All the other EQ-ing is done with a musical EQ such as the Stillwell Vibe EQ or a linear phase EQ.

    I rarely use reverbs on snares because they tend to sound really artificial. Most of my reverb comes from a blumlein ribbon pair a couple of meters in front of the kit. I use the snare top or a trigger as a key input to open the gates on them

    Oh, and always compress the tail offcourse :)
     
  11. MartijnPaauwe

    MartijnPaauwe Member

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    What everybody else says :) Before even recording be very certain that everything is tuned correct and you have the right snare/drumhead for the job. Evans Genera HD Dry is always a win for me, piece of moongel (or sometimes even 1/2 piece of moongel) and you're set. As far as tuning goes : I always start out with changing the head the night BEFORE a recording/gig/whatever. I tune it as high as i possibly can, i lay the snaredrum on the floor (soft floor ;)) with the batter pointing towards you. Now go on and stand on the head and bend through your knees a couple of times (and don't be afraid, the snarehead can handle it) so that you put some weight on it. This way the head adjusts to the snare drum, let it sit like this through the night. Next day you wanna tune it roughly the pitch you want it to be and then with your tuning key you'll tap near the lug and listen to the pitch that comes out of it, if you like it then tune the rest of the lugs EXACTLY like the one you chose. The trick here is not to follow the snare drum lugs clockwise or counterclockwise. You'll always tune the lug opposing to the one just tuned. Example ; If you like the pitch that comes out of the lug that sits at 12' o clock, you will tune the lug that is at the 6' o clock position, after that you'll go to the lug at 3' o clock for example, tune it in the pitch which is the exact as lugs 12 and 6 o clock, and then you'll go to 9 o' clock. Etcetera etcetera. During recording let the drummer check his tuning before recording a new song (just like a guitarist more or less) As far as pitch goes it doesn't go as far as tuning to a certain note to be in tune with the music :) It's more what fits the song and what you like. Also, if you have multiple snares at hand, check them out! A year and a half back with my old band we were recording our debute album, i had 3 snares at hand. My own Mapex 14X5,5 steel snare, a brass Ludwig Black Beauty 14x6,5 and a birch Tama 14x5,5. The thing i was not expecting that my own Mapex sounded better in our style of music then the Black Beauty! Which is a snare that i absolutely adore but it didn't quite fit in the musical image. Just use your ears! Also, it's very helpful too when the drummer knows his stuff, has a (correct!) opinion and is willing to adapt to the situation (which isn't very common ;))

    I truly hope you guys can get some information out of this story :) For donations give me a PM :p
     
  12. joeymusicguy

    joeymusicguy Member

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    i've done everything you said in this post when we recorded that snare.
     
  13. joeymusicguy

    joeymusicguy Member

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    yeah we did that, took time to tune it, use a tune watch, broke it in, let it sit over night, retuned it, did the tuning properly doing the keys in the right order, using the tune watch

    all of these things are what happened before we recorded the snare clip you hear
     
  14. joeymusicguy

    joeymusicguy Member

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    so most people are saying there needs to be more signals from the source (ie: overheads / room)

    but this is JUST about the raw top. making the raw top sound great.
     
  15. Trevoire520

    Trevoire520 Member

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    Let me know how that comes out man. I've heard Brendan 'O Brian does this and I love the drum sounds on some of his stuff.
     
  16. -Noodles-

    -Noodles- 3 Initals Mixer

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    Change the mic?
    Change the position?

    If it happens on EVERY snare and with every drummer - then it's either your technique, equipment or room.
    I can presume that it's not your equipment, so that only leaves two things. If you change your technique (even for comparison) and / or mic then that leaves the room that's the problem.
    Maybe switch the drum kit around 180* / 45* next time you're tracking?
     
  17. Seth Munson

    Seth Munson How do Amber Lamps?

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    kinda OT, but joey.

    is the snare in that song that they just posted slate? or is it blended?

    and is there anyway you could post a clip of the song on dropbox or something? i wanna hear it without the shitty myspace player.
     
  18. pipaguapique

    pipaguapique Remember Me

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    http://www.mercenary.com/smmiwitatr.html

    you should try this one...my snares sound way better now.
     
  19. CatharsisStudios

    CatharsisStudios trcksngsrpbngs

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  20. Erik Monsonis

    Erik Monsonis Member

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    I also do that kinds of cuts, feel really stupid doing them, but hey! they work!
     

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