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The Books/Reading Thread

Discussion in 'GMD Social Forum' started by Matt, May 16, 2007.

  1. ~Neurotica

    ~Neurotica perfectly insane

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    I can tell....
     
  2. clschniffer

    clschniffer New Metal Member

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    It's one of the retarded movies I've ever seen. That and Pink Flamingos. But this is about books, not the typical and yet obliged metalheads' addiction to all-kind-of-gore art.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Cronopio

    Cronopio Glorious Imperator

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    I read that book like 20 years ago and loved it.
     
  4. rms

    rms Active Member

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    Naked Lunch? How is it retarded?
     
  5. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    I'd pay him no mind, he's rather trollish. Rather than contribute thoughtfully to the thread, he's more interested in mocking other people's contributions.
     
  6. clschniffer

    clschniffer New Metal Member

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    High-five Swedish buddy!
     
  7. clschniffer

    clschniffer New Metal Member

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    Because...

    After developing an addiction to the substance he uses to kill bugs, an exterminator accidentally murders his wife and becomes involved in a secret government plot being orchestrated by giant bugs in a port town in North Africa

    How is it not?
     
  8. ~Neurotica

    ~Neurotica perfectly insane

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    Sounds like South Park...
     
  9. rms

    rms Active Member

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    Except it's all in his head and he's going bananas?
     
  10. tagradh

    tagradh Active Member

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    Reading the second part, I think (the second part of the second part, i.e. 'Shift') of the Wool trilogy/series. Glad I missed the sticker on the first book declaring it 'THE NEXT HUNGER GAMES' when I picked it up at the station. Decent stuff so far.

    Also reading A Line in the Sand by James Baar, Catastrophe by Max Hastings and Iraq: From War to A New Authoritarianism by some dude.

    And trying to read the Koran in Arabic.
     
  11. Master_Yoda77

    Master_Yoda77 True Doom

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    I love this man's poetry. Fucking magnificent sonnet work in Astrophil and Stella, but this is SLOOOOOOOOOOW so far.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Funerary_Doom

    Funerary_Doom My head is bloody, but unbowed.

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    Any Kurt Vonnegut readers? Just grabbed a few books by him I have yet to read ( "Cats Cradle" and "Mother Night"). He's definitely among my favorite writers. Anyone know any other great postmodernist authors please send my way.
     
  13. monoxide_child

    monoxide_child New Metal Member

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    is this^^ sex??
     
  14. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    I'm really happy this thread is getting so much love.

    Somebody recommended those books to me. Don't know when I'd ever get to them, but I'm intrigued.

    Tables turned, my friend; I'm glad I'm not you, and I don't know how you can get through that stuff. :cool:

    Vonnegut's great. I've read Breakfast of Champions, Slaughterhouse Five, Sirens of Titan, Galapagos, and Cat's Cradle. Went through a bit of a kick in high school.

    As far as postmodernist authors go, that's my favorite "period" (postmodernism isn't really a period in my opinion, but it's the only way we can talk about it). Some of my favorites are:

    Cormac McCarthy (it's really unfair to call him postmodernist; he's a modernist through and through)
    Don DeLillo
    Richard Powers
    Thomas Pynchon
    Kathy Acker (super weird shit)
    David Foster Wallace
    Margaret Atwood
    Paul Auster

    Also, for really good "postmodern" science fiction, Samuel Delany and William Gibson are must-reads.
     
  15. unknown

    unknown fuck ftagn

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    Also, FD, if you're a fan of Kurt Vonnegut, check out Douglas Adams if you haven't already
     
  16. MotherEel

    MotherEel Member

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    And if you're a fan of Douglas Adams, check out Jasper Fforde.
     
  17. Funerary_Doom

    Funerary_Doom My head is bloody, but unbowed.

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    Thanks guys for all the reccommendations! I'll have to make another trip to the bookstore very soon. I've read one Cormac McCarthy book, Blood Meridian, and enjoyed that very much so will have to look further into his other works. And if it's cool to ask, why is postmodernism not really a period in your opinion? Just curious, ha, but thanks for the recommendations. Have you read any Pynchon novels by any chance?

    I have not read Douglas Addams or Jasper Ffrorde, so will definitely keep a look out for all those. Thanks!
     
  18. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    Blood Meridian is possibly my favorite 20th-century American novel.

    When I say that postmodernism isn't really a "period," all I mean is that it was basically created out of necessity. The history of literary analysis caught up with itself, and we called the early twentieth century "modernism"; then, when critics realized that authors of the 1970s and '80s were doing something different, we needed something else to call it; since it was so close to us, all we could really think of was to say: "Well, it's not modernism; it must be postmodernism."

    In my opinion, I don't think postmodernism describes a period but rather a specific shift in aesthetic principles and in values with which we approach literature. We can find moments of this aesthetic shift as early as the eighteenth century in Lawrence Sterne's Tristram Shandy. Since the '80s, we've seen the emergence of writers that seem to revert back to the original modernist principles, albeit with new subtle differences; and we have no good label for these writers.

    So, long story short, postmodernism has always seemed (to me) more like a quick fix to a conceptual problem than a legitimate historical development.

    EDIT: just saw the question on Pynchon. The only thing I've read is Mason & Dixon, and it was incredibly difficult (the style and language of the novel are very particular and dense). The Crying of Lot 49 is known to be an easier work by Pynchon, far more accessible, and yet considered to be an important literary milestone. So that might be a good place to start. I still haven't read it, but it's on my shortlist.
     
  19. MotherEel

    MotherEel Member

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    Hermann Hesse may appeal to you as well, depending on what you enjoyed about Cormac McCarthy.
     
  20. Master_Yoda77

    Master_Yoda77 True Doom

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    I'd rather sit down with Philip Sidney than read most of that "modernism" and POMO stuff. I get shivers just thinking about reading "As I Lay Dying" again.
     

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