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Touch Keyboard!

Discussion in 'Bar' started by Morgan C, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. Morgan C

    Morgan C MAX LOUD PRESETS¯\(°_o)/¯

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  2. SocialNumb

    SocialNumb Damn Christians!

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    It does look cool. Would like to try it.
     
  3. ~BURNY~

    ~BURNY~ Member

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    It's weird nobody thought about it sooner.
    The guy uses horrible sounds tho.
     
  4. indecizo

    indecizo Member

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    Didn't know Ben Stiller played keyboards. Anyways, didn't this exist already? I mean, I remember something like this on electric organs with different technology back in the day or am I wrong?
     
  5. Shull

    Shull New Metal Member

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    Sweet! Kinda similar concept to the Continuum (Jordan Rudess played one in a Dream Theater DVD) but I definitely prefer an actual keyboard. Would be nice to have your pitch-bend hand freed up too. But damn, those prices.
     
  6. C_F_H_13

    C_F_H_13 Protools Guru

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    that's pretty awesome. From even a sound design perspective, triggering samples from a keybaord like that and manipulating them as they play is pretty amazing. I'd love to get my hands on one of these.
     
  7. indecizo

    indecizo Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyboard_expression
    Displacement sensitive keyboards are often found on organs. Most mechanical organs, and some electrically actuated organs, are displacement sensitive, i.e. when a key is pressed partway down, the corresponding note (pipe, reed, or the like) in the organ will produce a different, quieter sound than when the key is fully depressed. In some organs, the pitch and/or tone colour may also be altered. Small tabletop organs and accordions often respond similarly, with sound output increasing as keys are pressed further down. Even the small circular accompaniment ("one button chord") keys found on accordions and on some organs exhibit this phenomenon. Accordingly, some electrically actuated organs have retained this form of keyboard expression:
    A 34-rank organ located in the Swiss village of Ursy is equipped with hi-tech features from Syncordia including what has been erroneously claimed to be the first non-mechanical action in history to directly control the opening of a pipe organs pallets in direct proportion to the movement of the keys, thus ostensibly combining the virtues of electric action with the intimate control of tracker action. However, Vincent Willis' 1884 patent Floating Lever pneumatic action also had this capability.

    Other more sophisticated forms of sensitivity are common in organ keyboards. Both the Pratt Reed and Kimber Allen 61-key (5-octave) keyboards have provision for installing up to nine rails, so that they can sense various amounts of displacement, as well as velocity in various regimes of distance from the top to the bottom of the key travel of each key. Some modern instruments such as the Continuum, a MIDI controller for keyboards, have extremely sophisticated human interface schemes, allowing dynamic control in three dimensions. In principle, displacement can be differentiated to get velocity, but the converse is not entirely practical, without some amount of baseline drift. Thus a displacement sensing keyboard may have greater versatility when it is desired to have both organ and piano behaviour in an input device.
     

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