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Viking mythology and all that goes with it

Discussion in 'Amon Amarth' started by Celtik Militia, Jan 29, 2005.

  1. TheLastWithPaganBlood

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    No odin gave it to Mimer so he could drink fromhis well so that He cold see everything that happened? or something and then he tossed his eye into the well, not knowing that because it was placed there he could see, no because he drank of the water.
     
  2. Sleipnir

    Sleipnir Thorsmadr

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    Odin gave his eye to Mimir in exchange for a drink from the well, totally seperate story.

    Odin did toss Thiazis eyes into the sky.
     
  3. TheLastWithPaganBlood

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    Yeah I meant his own eye, thought it was a mix up, thought it was a new question. Could he then see everything that happened or what?
     
  4. Tyra

    Tyra Member

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    Odin could see everything because his eye was in Mimer's well. Even at that, he had Hugin and Munin (no, not Mumin, the troll ;-) )to tell him all that was going on before he gave up his eye.
    Celtik, in response to your question about Gugnir: what Sleipnir said. He pierced himself with Gugnir onto Yggdrasil so that he could gain the wisdom of the runes. He hung there for nine days and nine nights before he could gain that knowledge. Don't forget that runes in the Norse society is not just an alphabet, but also a tool for divination. In any case, what Sleipnir said is how I was thinking about it, and I really did not write it at all to be poetry. I was just sooooooooo pissed off, and that's what came out of my brain at the time.
     
  5. TheLastWithPaganBlood

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    Is the number nine divine in nordic mythology? 'cause he hung for nine days and nicghts and his ring creates nine other rings and so on.
     
  6. SovietNecroWeasel

    SovietNecroWeasel Bane of Nuns.

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    Does anyone know anything about the city Jomsborg? All I know about it is that it's where the Joms Vikings came from.
     
  7. Tyra

    Tyra Member

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    Yes, that is exactly right! The number nine is/was divine, and to a certain extent, so is thirteen (hence the Christian notion that the number 13 is associated with bad luck and Satan...Odin as a subject of idolworship is in the Christian mind equal to or a personification of Satan). As you have pointed out, the number nine figures in a great many stories to do with magic and fortune, and many other numbers that are important for the mythology and the religion (as, for example, how many men/horses/whatever do we sacrifice during blòt) are multiples of nine etc.

    The Jomsvikings were legendary, and are mentioned in Heimskringla as a force stationed in Jomsborg. The town of Jomsborg has never been found, archaeologically speaking, and it is up for discussion as to whether it ever existed or not, but as far as the Heimskringla etc is concerned, it describes the town as an ideal place for a good viking machoman to live, some sort of Utopia for a Norse hird. Jomsborg was supposed to have been a fortified town on the east side of Wollin. Accordingly, the jomsvikings were an organized hird of professional fighters, rather than men who also farmed, fished or took part in another craft.
     
  8. Mormagil

    Mormagil bring back the corvee

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    Anybody here read Old Icelandic? Just wondering.
     
  9. TheLastWithPaganBlood

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    cool,
    I thought 13 was like some jewish holy lucky number, but you're saying it's nordic?
     
  10. Tyra

    Tyra Member

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    Yes, well, it is Norse but it also figures in other religions (can't think of specifics just this second 'cause I am in the middle of writing this hugeass exam on the celts during the bronze age for my masters degree in archaeology - I am currently eating, dreaming and shitting prehistoric celts.....let me think on it and maybe I can give you a better answer!).
    Here are, in any case, som places in which the #9 figures in asatro:
    -Like you said, the ring produces nine rings and Odin hung on Yggdrasil for nine days and nine nights.
    -Odin as shaman had knowledge of 9 magical arts ("magiska konster" - du förstår mig ändå på svenska, va?)
    -There were 9 worlds within the world tree.
    -Heimdal was born by his nine sisters (who then also are his nine mothers).
    -According to Adam of Bremen (who is not a very reliable source, but none the less explained a few things for us) said that a blòt which was particularly holy was held at Uppsala every 9 years. During this blòt, 9 animals from 9 different species (and some humans) were sacrificed by hanging in a holy grove by the temple.
    The list goes on, but that's all I can think of for right now....
     
  11. Tyra

    Tyra Member

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    Oh, and there is some thing about the moon being full 13 times in one year or something to that effect which lead to many old calendars having 13 months BC. 13 is mostly associated with bad luck in religions. It is, for example, associated with the goddess of Hades (the Greek version of Hell), there were 13 people at the last supper (except for in Da Vinci's painting thereof - he has an extra hand in the picture...big controversy...let's not go there!!). In some instances, such as in Ibn Fahadlan's recounting of his experience with the Rus vikings (later turned inte Eaters of the Dead, which turned into...you guessed it.....13th warrior) it is a fortunate thing to be dealing with the number 13, which is why there had to be 13 warriors to go on that particular expidition. Anyhow....
     
  12. Celtik Militia

    Celtik Militia Dumb French Bastard

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    oh geeze all that is very informative and cool, thx tyra!

    by the way i got another thing i've been thinking about for a while. i guess most of you know that each day of the week corresponds to a pagan God (hmmm well i think thats true).. for example Thursday corresponds to the germanic God Thor, and in french/spanish we say Jeudi/Jueves which corresponds to the greek/roman God Jupiter (zeus) who is the equivalent of thor in latin mythology. i guess Friday must be Frigga's day (or freya) cause in french/spanish we say Vendredi/Viernes which sounds much like Venus, Frigga's (or freya's) equivalent (?). Saturday comes from Saturn, Wednesday in french is Mercredi = mercury....etc....
    all that to ask : isnt the 7 days in a week thing a Judeo Christian thing? cause God created earth in 7 days. if thats so, why would christians take pagan god names for the days of the week? or did the pagan romans have a 7 day week too in their calendar because it was just logical? or did we just name these days in the week with old names no longer used like we use latin to name parts of the moon, or ancient gods to name planets...
    thx for answering :)
     
  13. Belgar

    Belgar The Wallonian Redneck.

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    Well the first inhabitants of Latium only had a 10 months calendar and later added Janus in honour of Janus first king of Latium then Febro god of the dead. Thus we gained 12 months, back then calendar also had around 305 days.

    You must also remember that in France sometimes during the 1700-1800's they had the republican calendar that had 10 days-10months and was changed back to 7 later on.
     
  14. Tyra

    Tyra Member

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    Who knows, maybe they didn't know they were names of old deities (Ansgar and the other missionaries did not speak Old Norse, so what's really to say that they knew what the origin of the words were - they were there to Christianize the heathens, not to learn about their language and why they say things the way they do), or maybe it was just too difficult to eradicate all traces of paganism in the language because it is so ingrained? Not sure what to tell you. Either way, the Norse/Saxon names were there in use before the countries became Christian, so the names would have had to be erased and a new name for each day would have had to be superimposed over the old ones. It becomes difficult to superimpose a new name for one of your own gods when you only have one god.... We'd be stuck with Jesusday, Holyfatherday, Holysonday, Holyghostday, Jahweday and so on (LOL). The bible, in Genesis, also states that God's name is too holy for us to speak, so you can't really name a day for him anyhow. We got the name Jahwe because it was one we could handle.
    Swedish goes like this: måndag (Moon's day), tisdag (Tyr's day), onsdag (Oden's day), torsdag (Thor's day), fredag (Frey's day), lördag (lödgaredagen=washingday), söndag(Sun's day). The English names correspond to these days, but with the saxon (who were of the germanic asatru religion) way of saying the names (Wotan for Odin, Tiwaz for Tyr and so on): " Moonsday, Tiwazday, Wotansday, Thorsday, Freysday and Sunsday", all except for Saturday, which comes from the roman god Saturnus. That is because of what Belgar said. We lost those days that were named for the roman gods, and kept the Saxon ones. The French, Spanish, Rumanians, Italians etc, who were under roman rule for a whole lot longer than the Sae, kept the roman gods for their names of the week. Make sense?
     
  15. Blutaar

    Blutaar RAVENSBURGER

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    I want to know more about the pagan temples (celtic temples)
    Where were these temples ?
    Are there any remains ?
     
  16. Tyra

    Tyra Member

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    No, no Celtic temples. They, like the Norse, worship any place. This can be in the home or outside in a sacred grove, or wherever one can best feel the gods and goddesses. Or where one can find a space large enough to hold all those who are gathered, when it's a larger ceremony. The Romans left temples behind on the Brittish isles, though. According to Adam of Bremen, Snorre and a few others, there was a heathen temple at Uppsala with statues of Thor, Oden and Frey. It, along with many other pagan temples throughout history, was purposely destroyed (according to abovementioned scholars) when the new religion came (same as the Muslims in Afghanistan destroyed the several thousand years old images of the Buddha). This is chronicled in for example the Heimskringla and Sagas of Icelanders, where it also tells you about the look of the temple etc. The old harg and any other temple-like structures would not have been well preserved anyhow, because by all account, these were wooden structures, not condusive to preservation down through the millenia.
     
  17. Blutaar

    Blutaar RAVENSBURGER

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    thx, interesting stuff
    You should become a history teacher!
     
  18. TheLastWithPaganBlood

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    The Germanic people only had five days in each week and those were named after the gods - the two extra days (Moon and sun day) are probably christian as you say and added later.
     
  19. TheLastWithPaganBlood

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    Oh yeah, wasnt there this anecdote about aholy grove with a holy tree (I believe it was an oak) in Saxland which was burned downed by a furious priest who later got his head chopped off thus causing Charlemagne to go on his brutal crusade against the saxons?l
     
  20. Blutaar

    Blutaar RAVENSBURGER

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    I think you are talking about the destruction of Irminsul.That was a holy three
    wich was (I think so) a symbol for something like yggdrasil.
    But i dont know the furious priest.
    Perhaps you think of Carl the Great ?!
    His army killed many (about 4500?) saxons in the year 782.
     

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