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Why would a band request to be there when mixing?

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by ShipwreckSoundWorks, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. ShipwreckSoundWorks

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    Took on yet another client recently, and they requested to be there when I'm mixing it. I mean, I've heard of bands doing this (mainly through facebook posts by bands I follow) but I guess I just don't understand the point.

    I feel like it's going to be trouble, because they are going to want things they don't necessarily understand..
     
  2. UncleBob

    UncleBob Member

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    I can't think that as a non participant, it could be fun to sit there while someone else cleans up and edits tracks for hours on end, but I guess if they're fine with that and they just sit there and keep quite (as if) then it's their problem.
     
  3. Sloan

    Sloan Sounds like shit!

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    Just say no.
     
  4. greyskull

    greyskull Member

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    I don't really like mixing with the band around; HOWEVER, it can be good to bring them in towards the end of the process just to make sure that they like the direction you're headed in.

    I did a mix for a band once remotely, sent them files and they HATED it.
    Had to totally re-do the whole mix from scratch which I wouldn't have done had they been there.
     
  5. SoundSpiral

    SoundSpiral Member

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    Band sitting in might be a good thing or a bad thing. Depends totally on the personalities involved.
    If there is just one guy in the room with you and he knows when and what to comment, the mix will come together easier.
    The guy sitting in will eliminate the never ending cycle of e-mails with fix lists.
    And believe or not the mix will be better and THE CLIENT HAPPIER.

    I have had many positive experiences with one guy sitting in.
    Have him come over after you have done all of the stuff he couldn't / shouldn't have anything constructive to say (tom automation, sample replacement...)

    Just don't have five drunken guys with their girlfriends yelling in the control room...
    And be sure to be the one who calls the shots, and at least let them know when you disagree with their requests.
     
  6. Loren Littlejohn

    Loren Littlejohn Lover of all boobage.

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    I have not had that happen to me yet surprisingly.

    I can't think of a single good reason to have someone around while you edit stuff for hours.
     
  7. Mashreef

    Mashreef New Metal Member

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    +1
     
  8. EmilDelaRosa

    EmilDelaRosa New Metal Member

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    What the top guys do is mix alone for a couple of hours (3-5 maybe and with breaks of course), then ask the band members or the producer to come in and tell the mixer what they think of the mix, do the revisions, and then make the final decision the next morning. I've read this from Bob Clearmountain's interview. I'm not sure how it is for metal though.

    Edit: Of course it's totally different when you're working with amateur musicians who don't know what they really want.
     
  9. Machinated

    Machinated Member

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    i actually think there's a lot of benefit to having the band there, but only once you've got started on it.

    it saves a lot of time on automation, effects, as well as mix things rather than doing recall after recall. its annoying when theyre about and you're doing the boring stuff, but once the mix has taken some shape it's not a terrible idea.
     
  10. Deuteronomy

    Deuteronomy Member

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    It is better to bring only 1 band member-the most experienced who already has a vision.If all the band comes then probably it will be very annoying
     
  11. nialldoran

    nialldoran Member

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    ive done my last few projects with the band around and as people said already it can be a good thing or bad, i prefer it if the band are cool and speak up only when necessary i hate that email fix list thing mentioned here,

    but i totally understand why 90% of projects should be done unattended, you get to try crazy stuff and do drum sample stuff without any one questioning you,
     
  12. Trevoire520

    Trevoire520 Member

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    If someone in the band actually knows what they want then it can be quite helpful. But most bands just suggest it because they're control freaks and often have NO IDEA about mixing.
     
  13. LBTM

    LBTM Proud Behringer User

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    i'm usually asking the band what they want to sound like before recording. when someone asks to be there I always say "no" politely and tell them I've already got an email telling me how they want to sound and if they have additional comments I would be glad to take them. after the mixes are finished i'll call them on my studio to hear them and tell me about final suggestions/changes. most of the time they will tell me all kind of stupid pointless advice (they always find something wrong and want to make comments -- always) they have and I just tell them "i'll be sure to check this" but most of the times I don't make any changes. i've got thanked many times thought for "fixing what they suggested" and delivering a better mix. --you know. they can't be subjective listening on a totally different sound system for the first time.
     
  14. ~BURNY~

    ~BURNY~ Member

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    I always say "I need to sort things for a while then I call you back with a rough mix and we start mixing from there"
    Meaning the core of the mix is in fact done without the band and the "mix" becomes a finalization. I never had someone make me change things significantly.

    But, remember you need to built a relationship based on trust if you want them to come back for the next project.
    You need to make the band feel involved at some point even if it's just details in the end.

    Be smart, be wise, be prepared to argue when the band ask for something that seem stupid and detrimental to the music, but do it with a diplomatic approach.

    Make them feel like you value their opinion even when you disagree. In the end, they are the client and it is their music.
    Sometimes (rarely tho) they can even bring some good ideas that you'd never would have thought.

    One last thing, I prefer not to have the full band when possible (it is 95% of the times) but just a couple of guys who feel more involved artistically.
     
  15. jeid

    jeid Terribad

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    I usually do the majority of the mix and then send over a rough mix. Do as someone suggested and get them in at that point.
     
  16. xFkx

    xFkx gain induction

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    having them around, in another room and calling them up in critical places seems like a nice idea, but having a bunch of dudes sitting behind me while i'm tweaking attack/release settings on a compressor for 10 minutes would grind on my nerves
     
  17. Darren "Jenk" Jenkins

    Darren "Jenk" Jenkins Producer. Engineer. Mixer

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    I usually have the band come in towards the end of the day when the mix is near completed. There's a lot of time wasting if they're there from the beginning. The bands that are adamant on being there from start to end usually get bored very quickly and as the days go by end up turning up to the sessions less and less. Most of the time these days I'm mixing by myself so this isn't a regular occurrence. Especially with e-mixing becoming so popular.
     
  18. egan.

    egan. daylightdies.com

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    Nobody including the band wants the band there for roughing stuff in, but getting them all in for the last hour or so may save you a bunch of recalls.
     
  19. LBTM

    LBTM Proud Behringer User

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    I've got a band that insisted to be there while mixing. Of course I didn't want them there so for half an hour I was tweaking compressors and EQs listening to the exact same part again and again instead of editing as I would normally do. They asked me if it was ok to leave and I told them "please... i would love to hear your comments". the moment was absolutely hilarious!
     
  20. BLUElightCory

    BLUElightCory Member

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    Just ask them to let you get things started and then have them come in later in the day. It works better for everyone, especially if you consider the fact that the band will hear the finished-ish mix with fresh ears and more objectivity. It's win-win.
     

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