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All you need to know about Finnish language...

Discussion in 'CoB Off-topic' started by Narcisse, Dec 19, 2001.

  1. FridgePack

    FridgePack That Swede!

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    Uh, was tired as hell when i wrote that post.

    Okey, got it. Because the teacher had our names as examples. Mine is Andreas- became: Andreaksen and my friend Jonathan-Jonathanin.

    Yeah, already kinda knew that. Anyhow. My question was like how you know if to write "Syötkö sinä?" or... damn this is hard to explain over the interwebs--

    Try to write some questions in finnish for me, about anything. And I'll try to explain with those questions- Sopiiko?
     
  2. ESA1996

    ESA1996 Active Member

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    You mean how to know is it "syöt sinä" with "kö" at the end of syödä, or something else?

    If it's that what you mean then I'll try to answer.

    The thing that makes Finnish hard is those small endings at the end of words, especially because they're slightly different with different words. You can't for example replace the "kö" at the end of syödä with an other verb etc.


    If thats not what you meant, here's a few questions:

    -Mikä sinun nimesi on? What's your name?

    -Pyöräiletkö paljon? Do you ride a bike alot?

    -Hypitäänkö trampoliinilla? Shall we jump on the trampoline?

    -Kuinka kauan olet opetellut suomea? How long have you been studying Finnish?

    -Asutko ruotsissa? Do you live in Sweden? Bor du i Svärje?
     
  3. ESA1996

    ESA1996 Active Member

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    1. "Minut on pidätetty" = I have been arrested

    2. "Vastustin pidätystä" = I resisted arrest
     
  4. FridgePack

    FridgePack That Swede!

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    Not that was not what i meant. Feeling quite confident about the endings- not always, like when you rearrange the word and erase letters before the-ko/ko. But here is a good example on what I really need help with.

    In the first question, it's "Mikä sinun..." and the other "Pyöräiletkö.." (and what a coincidence that the track "moottoripyörä on moottoripyörä" started just now. :D")

    But how do i know how to start the question? With ether "Mikä/Kenen" or just add -kö/ko to the word itself? Is it kinda about if it's a verb or not?

    Thanks =)

    Just for a try and some practice:

    1. Minnun niemi on Andreas
    2. Ei, minä ajaan auton.
    3. Kylle, me hypitää trampoliiinila!
    4. -
    5. Kylle, , minä astun ruotsissa =)
     
  5. Finpower

    Finpower Niinku Perkele

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    Sweden sucks= Ruotsi on perseestä.:fu::fu:


    <script src='http://img14.imageshack.us/shareable/?i=swedensucks.jpg&p=tl' type='text/javascript'></script><noscript>[​IMG]</noscript>

    [​IMG]
     
  6. iPot

    iPot fUCkTarD

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    ...the fuck?

    Finpower = lätkäjuntti
     
  7. Celeb

    Celeb Member

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    Trying to clarify a bit.
    "Mikä" translates basically as "what". It refers to a thing or object in questions.
    What is this? -> Mikä tämä on?
    What makes this difficult is that "What is this" can be translated also as "Mitä tämä on". And of course "mitä" is used in a different way than "mikä".

    The use of ko/kö might be problematic but here are some samples.
    What are you doing? -> Mitä teet?
    Are you doing something? -> Teetkö jotakin?

    So yeah, it has to do with the verb. I'm not a language expert so don't know the 'real' rules but basically if you ask someone if she/he is doing something in spesific, you use the ending ko/kö in the verb.
    Do you drive? -> Ajatko?
    Do you like him? -> Pidätkö hänestä?
    etc.

    And btw:
    1. Minnun niemi on Andreas -> Minun nimeni on Andreas
    2. Ei, minä ajaan auton. -> Ei, minä ajan autoa.
    3. Kylle, me hypitää trampoliiinila! -> Kyllä, me hypimme trampoliinilla
    4. -
    5. Kylle, , minä astun ruotsissa =) -> Kyllä, minä asun Ruotsissa
     
  8. hauta

    hauta Tengo mucho sueño -_-

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    ko/kö is like the English "do" :D Not that hard.. in fact, the entire language is not as difficult as it seems :)
     
  9. hauta

    hauta Tengo mucho sueño -_-

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    AAAAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHA :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Just out of curiosity, aren't those 2 words :rofl:
    Still don't know the exact part of the Finnish grammar when two or more words are written like one :loco:
     
  10. iPot

    iPot fUCkTarD

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    "Lätkäjuntti" is roughly translated as "ice hockey redneck". Usually it's used when talking about people who think ice hockey is like a religion to them and Teemu Selänne is their messiah. Aka 90% of population of Finland.
     
  11. Finpower

    Finpower Niinku Perkele

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    Teemy rules and so does Finland.:wave:
    WC Gold 2011


     
    #1951 Finpower, Mar 15, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2015
  12. iPot

    iPot fUCkTarD

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    What did I just say? /_\
     
  13. s

    s Member

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    Interesting, the video mentions that 'y' is also a vowel. I remember being taught that every English word has to have a vowel in it. There are exceptions like the word 'fly' and in cases like this the 'y' is the vowel substitute.

    s
     
  14. Leandro

    Leandro ¬¬

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    That's because 1. English orthography is fucked up and 2. The separation between vowels and consonants is very fuzzy when dealing with approximants like "y" as in "you" or w. Depending on what you feel like, they might either be an approximant or a very short vowel, but in English it turns out to be convenient to classify them as consonants at least because of the choice for indefinite articles (a/an) and maybe for other reasons.

    Nevertheless, it is not strictly true that every English word needs a vowel: when saying, for example, Fish and Chips, the "and" is reduced to a simple 'n' most of the time. This is because some words in English have strong and weak forms, distinguished by pronunciation. When someone asks you if you found the cat, they might answer they found a cat, with emphasis on the a, and that's the strong form, whereas most of the time it's just a schwa, the weak form. Same goes for "and", the weak form does not require pronunciation of a vowel, it depends on who's speaking.

    As second point, "fly" does have a vowel. You need to analyze the pronunciation of the word, and not the particular arbitrary rules someone chose for putting the language into paper. Fly is pronounced as /fla&#618;/, with a diphthong, meaning the "consonant" y is not even there in the first place.

    Blame the great vowel shift.
     
  15. s

    s Member

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    I was referring to the spelling.

    Since you mentioned the pronunciation, in the case of Fish 'n' Chips the 'n' is pronounced: an, en, un. Sounds like Fishin' chips to me.

    s
     
  16. Leandro

    Leandro ¬¬

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    The spelling does not exist. It's an artifact of transcribing speech to paper. It's not part of the language proper. If you say "vowel", you mean vowel sound.

    And yes, but that's just your accent/a bad example. Try "rock and roll". See here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weak_form_and_strong_form
     
  17. s

    s Member

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    In other words it's just like music theory.

    s
     
  18. s

    s Member

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    Rockan Roll

    Rockin Roll

    Rocken Roll

    Rockun Roll

    same thing.

    s
     
  19. Leandro

    Leandro ¬¬

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    Kinda, music theory would be more like grammar rules: they are a static guideline that may or may not reflect how people speak/make music. If you really meant music transcription, then sure.
     
  20. hauta

    hauta Tengo mucho sueño -_-

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    Teemu rules! Does that means that I am lätkäjuntti? Do NOT answer that..

    Alright, now the question: How can I say hän on, me olemme ja te olette in spoken Finnish?
     

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