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Another string question

Discussion in 'Backline' started by tk7261, Apr 6, 2015.

  1. tk7261

    tk7261 Member

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    So, so many bands these days are using really heavy strings these days. I also want to ask this for myself. But what are your opinions on how string gauge effects tone in drop c. Is 10-52 too light? Is it possible to get an aggressive and satisfying sound with a .52 on the c in drop c. I always though Adam D used 12-52 so It cant be that bad right? Anyone know what Sneap prefers?

    I hear bands using .54s in drop c, .56 in drop c, and even .54 in c#. Am I making my tone worse by not going up. I only ask cause I loooooove how my guitar plays, but I'm also a tone perfectionist.
     
  2. Trevoire520

    Trevoire520 Member

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    I recorded this with 10-52's in drop C, though personally I find them a bit thin for that tuning, hitting the strings hard makes them go sharp, so I'm using 12-60 these days.

     
    #2 Trevoire520, Apr 6, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2015
  3. jeid

    jeid Terribad

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    Watched a video with Sneap saying that he thought heavier strings added a certain roundness to the sound and he thought 10-52's were good for Dropped C.
     
  4. tk7261

    tk7261 Member

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    Sounds great Trevoire520. And do you remember what video it was jeid? Id like to check that out

    I should also add I have a 24.75in scale length.
     
  5. MrBongo

    MrBongo idiot at work

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    12-60 here for Standard C, on 25.5" scale.
    lighter gauge would work just as well, there´s just no sets with better balance on the market.
    gonna order some sets with custom gauge soon, with slightly lighter E-A-D and the same 12-16-20 on the other strings.
     
  6. FIXXXER

    FIXXXER ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    thicker strings can help minimize pick attck detuning and other tuning issues, however the thicker the low E the more attack and clarity you'll lose, it's always a compromise...
    10-52 in drop C/25,5 scale works just fine for me.
     
  7. Vice//Versa

    Vice//Versa Dude among dudes

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    The way I see it is that thicker strings normally minimize buzzing and enhance pitch stability. When it comes to rhythm guitars in particular, picking hard is necessary in order to get better transients and note definition; if you pick too hard on thin strings (particularly chords), then you can get pitch issues.

    This is why I think the thick strings/light pick combo is in fashion lately.

    A different set of strings won't cost you any more than whatever you're using, so if I was you, I would just pop a set of 12-60 and see how it feels playing wise. Maybe even do a shootout if you're concerned about the tone (?)
     
  8. Max Morton

    Max Morton Member

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    10-52 are exactly the gauge I use in drop C on 25.5 scale (and in drop C# on 24.75 scale). 11-56 are cool in drop C on 24.75 scale. Thicker ones sound a bit dull and uncontrolled as for my liking.
     
  9. tk7261

    tk7261 Member

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    The reason I can't just try out a thicker gauge is cause I would have to get my nut filed. And I hate having that done cause it so permanent. And I'd have to get my guitar intonated, then intonated again if I don't like it and want to go back.

    After a quick test yesterday this is what I found: 10-52s on a Les Paul scale guitar are pretty much the lightest thing possible for Drop C. I've seen people use 10-52s but with the 25.5 scale. So is it a bit too thin? It might be. Im really pushing it. But I was surprised by the results of my test.

    I Played a couple riffs once with the current setup, again with a capo on the first fret (so I can play the riffs in the same scale as a half step up, but with the lighter tension), and then tuned up the guitar and played the riffs again. I found that I actually like the loose sound better. It seems like the tighter strings actually had a tad less low end, and where a bit fizzier sounding and less clear. There was more note definition with the thinner string. I did however do this test with my other guitarists guitar, (which is the same scale length w/ the same string gauges) and his guitar has Blackouts. So I'll have to repeat the test with my guitar cause it has JBs. It might make a difference. The JBs aren't as aggressive sounding as the Blackouts, so difference in sound maybe or may nor be a good or bad thing with the other guitar. Ill have to find out.
     

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