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Computer questions

Discussion in 'LORD' started by Lord Tim, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    Ah yes, that's what I was getting at in my previous question. I wasn't sure if my current board would only take DDR1 or if it was just that DDR1 and DDR2 couldn't operate together. That's cool, I'll just look at building my new machine. I wouldn't mind putting some DDR1 in for my mum's sake, but it doesn't seem like it's worth the money in a way. As you can see, I've never really looked into this before, hence running a PC with only 512MB RAM in late 2008!!
     
  2. sadisticsatyr

    sadisticsatyr Young Apprentice

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    90% of the time a board will only take one sort of RAM. Usually you can mix up latency and speeds if you really want, but it will always default to the slowest module.
     
  3. Charvelguy

    Charvelguy Member

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    You want that 184 pin ram I believe. Thats going to be a little higher priced as it isn't being as high of a demand in manufacturing.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820146545

    Check out the link above, price out some competition but crucial should be fine and they have 2x1gb sets as well.
    Thats a prescott p4, socket 478 - good processor - single core hyper-threader but a hot runner as far as temps.
     
  4. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    Thanks for your advice, all you guys!
     
  5. BurningCreation

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    I am going to upgrade my RAM also. I am wanting to go from 2gb to 4gb. Can I put 2 sticks of Kingston PC2-5300 1gb as well as 2 Kingston PC2-6400 in with no problem? Or do they have to be the same?
     
  6. Nam Taf

    Nam Taf Member

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    Both will run at 5300. All that is is a software change, more or less - there's no hardware differences between the two.
     
  7. Charvelguy

    Charvelguy Member

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    You should match your ram with like sets or make, manufacturer and timings.. Think of it as like buying two different sets of tires for your car when typically you should buy all four as a match. Sometimes you are ok with two different sets and speed ratings, height, width etc, but usually you know what you're getting into.

    If you are going 4gb, you'll need two slots of 2gb capacity each slot or 4 single slots of 1gb max capacity per slot.
    Make sure you have the correct number of slots and that they will take they rated speed and amount of ram size (ie; 1gb or 2gb?).

    If you buy a 2gb stick of PC2 6400 and your slot will only handle 1gb of PC25300... well, couple things could happen there.
    It may not work well or at all.
    It may only read 1gb of the 2gb in the slot at the rated max speed because that is all the slot can handle and is rated to put out.
     
  8. Keeper of the Seven Cheese

    Keeper of the Seven Cheese Metallic Progressor

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    Hi all. I was just wondering what kind of specs would be optimal nowadays for running a DAW such as Cubase/Reaper/Sonar with many VSTs loaded in. My current computer has a pretty early dual core processor, a sound blaster audigy (the cheapo ones) and only 1GB of RAM and I was looking into getting something that I would be able to record some demos with. My PC really isn't cutting it. I don't know my current processor speed offhand. I'm really out of touch with computer hardware at the moment in spite of the fact I was a bit of a tech buff before.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  9. Lord Tim

    Lord Tim That guy from LORD

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    I'm doing OK with a Pentium 4, 3.0Ghz CPU with 2 gig RAM, but I'm having to do a few workarounds when it comes to playing in real time with softsynths or if I have a lot of effects in my project. I have NO problems with disc throughput though - I can literally run hundreds of tracks at 24bit/44.1khz with no issue at all.

    I'd recommend a quad core processor, at least 2 gig RAM (and if you're using a lot of sample based instruments, more - but be aware that WinXP and any of the Vista32 flavours will only see 3 gig of RAM max, you'll have to go to XP x64 or 64 bit Vista to use more, and then there's some other gotchas to consider), and at least 2 hard drives - 1 for system, 1 for audio data files. If you can swing it, run 2 more: 1 for samples (if you do a lot of sample based softsynth stuff), and one for the windows swap file. If you go Vista, make sure you have a DX-10 capable video card with decent amounts of memory on board because if you use the Aero interface, Vista actually unloads all of the graphics into the GPU and speeds everything way up. If you don't have a card up to it, Vista's performance is WAYYYY down on XP.

    Soundcard wise, you're being let down by the Audigy. They're not really up to it, unfortunately. I'd recommend an Echo MIA - that's what I used to use here until I upgraded to my Mackie 1220 (and the MIA's performance still owns the Mackie's - it's a shame it didn't have the inputs I needed). I'd tend to stay away from USB based cards, and if you go Firewire, make sure your machine is running a Texas Instruments based Firewire controller or you may run into issues. Ones based on the Dice-II chipset especially will give you cancer.

    Different hosts prefer different cards though, so work out which one you use and troll their forums to see what works best (and worst) for each user.

    Just as a final word, if you do decide to go 64 bit to be able to use the extra memory space, make sure your components - especially your soundcard - have mature 64 bit drivers, and all of the software you plan to use is native 64 bit or you'll have BULK issues.

    That should give you a few places to start looking. :)

    EDIT: Just as a point of perspective, building a machine that powerful from scratch isn't that much different in price to a similarly spec'd Mac, so if you have no issue with legacy programs that need a PC, or you're happy to run in bootcamp for Vista, a Mac may be a good option too.
     
  10. Charvelguy

    Charvelguy Member

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    That is really very solid advice from LT.

    Not knowing your OS, increasing your ram to at least 2 gb if not preferably 4gb and swapping the sound card would be great change these first go-to type options.
     
  11. Lord Tim

    Lord Tim That guy from LORD

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    Yeah, adding another gig of RAM and getting a better sound card will make a HUGE difference. A core2duo isn't actually a bad processor at all for audio work so that should get you by for now if you upgrade the other parts. Having 2 hard drives will definitely increase your track count dramatically too, if you don't already have that happening.
     
  12. Keeper of the Seven Cheese

    Keeper of the Seven Cheese Metallic Progressor

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    Thanks very much for the replies.

    At the moment, I am running Windows XP and I like it that way. 2 of our computers are Vista and 5 on XP and I am not really very used to the Vista interface (and I believe it has a fair amount of problems with ASIO).

    Core2duo is alright for audio stuff? Fair enough. I'll work on changing the RAM first and then the soundcard. RAM is a fairly inexpensive piece of hardware now which is at least handy.

    Got the 2 Hard Drives going but I don't have it completely isolated for samples on one of the hard drives.

    One of the true ram hogs that I have going with Reaper is the Symphonic Choirs Library. That thing kills my computer even when run as a standalone application.

    Any of the audio guys on here tried it out before? Sounds bloody amazing.
     
  13. Lord Tim

    Lord Tim That guy from LORD

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    Yeah, I'd recommend running your samples on a 3rd hard drive then, so OS on one, audio data on another and your sample library on the third.

    Extra RAM will help big time, and it's a myth that ASIO performs poorer on Vista now - it was once true, but after SP1 came out, a lot of the issues were fixed. If you do plan to add more than another gig or two of RAM, you'll need to look into going 64 bit and Vista 64 is really the only game in town for PC based stuff now (XP x64 works but is unsupported by pretty much everyone now).
     
  14. Nam Taf

    Nam Taf Member

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    What OS are you running? Once you go above 4GB of RAM, things start getting complicated depending on whether your OS and/or applications are 32 or 64 bit.
     
  15. Lord Tim

    Lord Tim That guy from LORD

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    In fact 3GB in XP unless you use a special switch in the boot options to free up more for apps - the rest goes to the system whether you like it or not, and then you need to make sure the app that takes advantage of the extra RAM is coded as Large Address Aware too.
     
  16. Nam Taf

    Nam Taf Member

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    Now if only he were as good at guitar as he is at computers, maybe he'd be in a band! :p
     
  17. Mean Machine

    Mean Machine Happy Little Boozer

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    What program do people use for copying DVD's? (as in, movies). I usually use a combination of DVD Shrink and DVD Decryptor, but it doesn't seem to work on a lot of newer, more popular movies, I'm assuming due to some form of copy protection.
     
  18. Keeper of the Seven Cheese

    Keeper of the Seven Cheese Metallic Progressor

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    Just for reference my Processor is a Pentium D not a core2duo.
     
  19. Lord Tim

    Lord Tim That guy from LORD

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    Yeah, you got a similar machine to mine. If mine can do it, yours can. :)
     
  20. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    I'd like to be able to plug my headphones in and listen through them without having to take the main speaker cable out of the back of my soundcard (it's an Audigy). As it is they share the same line out plug. Do other soundcards offer separate ones in order to avoid this frustration? It seems crazy to have to pull a cable out every time I want to use my headphones.
     

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