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Dakryn's Batshit Theory of the Week

Discussion in 'GMD Social Forum' started by Ender Rises, May 19, 2007.

  1. rms

    rms Active Member

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    the mortality is what I'm referencing, the slave trade was about maintaining or replacing because of the harsh conditions for so long. So it's not a surge of slaves , rather a bring as many as we can because they lost so many.
     
  2. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    I could have sworn you have, but it would have been years ago when the subject even came up, so maybe things are different now, or I'm just misremembering.

    If it weren't for personal grievances the marxist and marxist adjacent cults wouldn't have many adherents. I don't see much difference between working for the Mises Institute and declaring yourself a marxist, in terms of having a single hammer and declaring all problems nails in need of a-hammerin. At least the Mises Institute has a legitimate claim to their ideas never having been tried.

    I already addressed both of these points. Demand wasn't down yet, but would have been as technology progressed. And again, yes slaves were transported to the US until right before the Civil War, but the number was minuscule (due primarily to the illegality, but still).
     
  3. Dak

    Dak mentat

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  4. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    I think this misrepresents the project of Marxist historicism (which, for you, always seems to come back to utopianism), but if the methodology is a problem for you then fine. I'll stand by what both historians cite unless you find something else.

    The highlighted words are suspicious.

    Also, it was illegal to bring slaves to the U.S., but not to trade them within the country. In the years just prior to the Civil War, large numbers of slaves were being transported to, and traded in, the Plantation South, where they were still in high demand.

    Ha, this is confusing as fuck to me, but then I've never been an image-based learner.
     
  5. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    Figured this is best for this thread:

    https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2020/...-fOX2IV5TJh5gNUSWJD0yBObjuebfc4xR5alKxJruflQ4

    There has been a lot of pushback against describing what's happening in the U.S. as fascist, but the arguments often fall back on either essentialist or reductionist arguments: i.e. fascism is either essentially Nazism, or fascism is only Nazism (or another Axis variety). This forces a narrow definition of fascism, which is already ill-defined; but as the piece points out, European fascism exhibited some significant characteristics:

    Many of these characteristics describe contemporary conservative politics; but even that doesn't fascism make. In other words, not all patriotism is fascist; but maybe all fascism is patriotic. Something to think about.

    The more interesting stuff is on Hitler's infatuation with American slavery.

    There's a clear objection here, i.e. that the U.S. doesn't tolerate slavery anymore. But fascist aspirations persisted well into the twentieth century in the U.S.:

    There's a lot to this piece, and it's not airtight; but it amasses a lot of historical evidence, and takes pains to acknowledge historical context:

    Provocative yes, but not overstated when taken as a whole.
     

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