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Do people usually listen to tracks with their volume turned all the way up?

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by InAbsentia_, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. waltz mastering

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    Mixing and mastering are two different processes/mind sets. The way you're going about it is like trying to put icing on a cake while it's still cooking.

    I can't think of to many commercially successful albums or singles where they were mastered straight off the mix buss. Maybe it's better for one offs or ref copies. It can be more of a work flow thing..to get away from the mix for a day and then approach it from a different view.
     
  2. Fama

    Fama Member

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    That's not what people mean when they say "louder is better". When they say that, they mean listening to the mix at low volumes or at high volumes, turning the monitors up or down.
     
  3. InAbsentia_

    InAbsentia_ Member

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    There is no difference in your perception of sound when you're mixing or listening to something in any other scenario. The statement 'louder is better' applies to every environment. Just because I'm looking at a DAW on a screen while listening to something doesn't change that. And that's definitely not what people mean when they say louder is better because your frequency perception is distorted at louder volumes, which is what makes it 'better', apparently.

    Mixes should sound better when they're louder if they sound good to you when they are quiet, but they don't, not me at least.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher–Munson_curves
     
  4. ze kink

    ze kink THE BLACK WIZARDS

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    I prefer mixing on low levels too. It's the same levels I use to listen to music and all such stuff at home anyway, so I know how it's supposed to sound to sound good and translate well. Occasionally I crank it up and play the track through once or twice to check if anything comes up. Very rarely does.

    When I'm tracking a band at e.g. the school studio though, I usually crank the monitors quite a bit more. Feels like it's easier to get the band "in the zone" like that.
     
  5. John_C

    John_C formerly Skeksis268

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    85dB is quite seriously dicing with cumulative hearing damage. Not a good idea. It'll be no good having great skills and the best gear in the best studio in the world that you've built up over 30 years if all you can hear by then is low passed at about 12kHz and with a massive dip from 2-6 kHz.
     
  6. Fama

    Fama Member

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    Checking wikipedia, you'd have to spend 8 hours on constant 85 db to get permanent hearing damage. Of course those are just guidelines, but I don't hink it's THAT bad...
     
  7. Force666

    Force666 Member

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    The thing that's good for us guys though is that when "mastering" on the mix-buss, if something needs fixing in the mix, it's easy to go back and fix what you need to in the mix without taking the time to export a new mixdown.

    Not sure about mastering off the mix-buss, but there's plenty of metal releases that were mastered by the recording engineer.

    What difference if any is there of mastering on the mix buss vs. a printed mix?
     
  8. John_C

    John_C formerly Skeksis268

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    a day mixing at 85dB may well cause very little problem. A decade of mixing at 85dB almost every day sums all these little problems to create a big one.
     
  9. InAbsentia_

    InAbsentia_ Member

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    That's what I was thinking with that comment. I think what waltz was trying to say there is that it takes you out of the 'mixing' frame of mind and into the 'mastering' thing. Focus shifting more or less.
     

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