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Floyd rose?

Discussion in 'Musicians Discussion' started by ubiquitos, Dec 17, 2004.

  1. ubiquitos

    ubiquitos Deadnight Warrior

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    what are the advantages of a floyd rose compared to a standard bridge? and also what would you recommend and why?
     
  2. sumairetsu

    sumairetsu Joker's Favorite

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    You can do the divebombing techniques that you can't do with a standard bridge without possibly breaking the neck off of your guitar or physically tuning down the tuners on the headstock.

    Another advantage of the Floyd is that it adds weight to the guitar meaning more sustain, especially if you have the locking nut.

    Disadvantages include longer time to change standard ball-end strings and if you are using one of the licensed versions of the vibrato, if you break a string, you're whole guitar goes out of tune since there may not be a locking feature.
     
  3. yabba

    yabba Member

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    that will happen regardless of brand, etc.
     
  4. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    I love the fact that my guitar will stay in perfect tune once the strings are stretched and locked. It adds a whole new dimension to your available sounds. I went from a solid bridge in '88 and I could never go back, they really work beautifully if set up correctly. Make sure you get the real thing, here's a link. http://www.floydrose.com/original.html I almost forgot, I learned a neat trick from a G.I.T grad, string the ball-end at the tuning key. This is great because when a string breaks(usually always at the bridge), you simply reel out more string and go right back to playing.
     
  5. Katalepsy

    Katalepsy Member

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    I was actually wondering about the same thing (Advantages and Disadvantages), because I'm probably going to buy an ESP LTD MH-50 (I'm a cheap ass, it's all I can afford), and I wasn't sure whether it would be a good idea to switch from a tailpiece to a tremolo. And I'm curious...What exactly is the difference between a licensed Floyd Rose, and a Floyd Rose original? I never really picked up on that concept...
     
  6. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    The "original floyd rose" is manufactured out of hardened steel and all of it's parts are machined to a fine tolerence. The licenced copies are in most cases cast rather than forged and made of inferior metals. The knife edges of my (1986) Floyd are the still as sharp as when it was installed. If you search the net, you will find many accounts of the licenced floyds suffering from a severe lack of tuning stability as well as generall durability. Once you get one of the (German-made) originals and compare it to the other stuff that's out there, you'll be amazed at the difference. :)
     
  7. Katalepsy

    Katalepsy Member

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    Is the overall construction the same on both? I mean, aside from materials and such, but like, how the metals are molded to fit the body of the guitar (screw placement, etc.), so then I can look into replacing it in the future without having to worry about fixing anything on the body.
     
  8. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    I am not familiar with the design specifications of any of the Floyd copies. I did look a Fender Strat with a licensed copy that was part of the Floyd-Rose/Fender partnership and it did seem identical, but that situation is the exception. I have noted that the routing templates do differ, so I would just wait, or get the real Floyd.
     
  9. Feicht

    Feicht Oh man, that is hot!!!

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    yeah real floyds are VASTLY superior to the "liscensed" ones. i have had both, and though it should seem like a no brainer, the real deal is infinitely better. you can do those divebombs and pullups without breaking strings (or your guitar, hehe), and there's alot of little tonal differences too, just in how everything sounds.

    my advice would be to just save your money till you have enough for a real floyd, you'll be glad you did :)
     
  10. Katalepsy

    Katalepsy Member

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    I mean... What's the difference between a Floyd Original and the licensed ones on these: http://www.espguitars.com/ltd_mh.htm ? I wasn't talking about a Strat tremolo...

    My real problem is that I don't have any income. I'm 17 years old and unemployed, so I wouldn't have enough money for a guitar with a Floyd original for a couple years (I have an amp to buy, and college to pay for soon as well). I wanted to know if it would be possible to replace the Lic. Floyd on the ESP MH-50 with a Floyd Original in the future and not have any problems in doing so. You may have said it somewhere, but I probably just missed it...
     
  11. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    The strat I mentioned has a dead-on copy manufactured with the assistance of F-R, I wasn't suggesting that you get one. As far as ESP goes, you would need to contact them about any differences in specs between the two trems in question.
     
  12. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    Yes!!!, a real Floyd Rose will give your guitar the voice of God, a cheap copy will give it the voice of Danny Devito.
     
  13. Bryant

    Bryant Mr. Sleepy

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    I am on the opposite end of the debate than my pal "Class of 85." I own a guitar with a "Floyd" and I love the guitar, but I wish it had a standard tremola on it. Every tremola will "dive bomb." Every tremola system will allow you to loosen the strings which will allow the note to go lower. Floyd Rose tremolas allow you to tighten the strings which brings the pitch of the note up as well.
    It takes a long time to change strings on a Floyd because most have a locking system and fine tuners. I am waaaay too lazy for that shit. To be honest, it is not laziness, but the fact I use little tremola in my style of playing makes the Floyd unnecessary, so why take the extra time to string it up ?
    If you use the "whammy" quite a bit in your style or like guitarists that do, I suggest a Floyd and it "looks" metal and impressive due to it's high number of machined parts, but if you don't use it, don't bother. I own a beautiful early model Peavey Vandenberg with a Floyd and I wouldn't take the world for it, but that is the only guitar I own with a Floyd and I doubt I will buy another.


    Bryant
     
  14. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    Very true, if there is no serious need for one, then don't bother. I must admit that the guitar in my avatar is a strictly metal-only, purpose-built machine and there are times when it might be nice not to have to mess with all the strict procedures that come with a real floating Floyd.
     
  15. Loner

    Loner In Despise

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    I don't reccomend getting a Floyd unless you plan on using it a lot. The're a lot more word than a fixed bridge, and your tone isn't as good due to the bridge not being mounted directly on the body. However, with that said, I do love the way they feel on my picking hand, and 4 out of my 5 guitars have them (1 is an original).

    On a side note, how's it going, Feicht? I haven't seen you around since I stopped visiting The Frozen Palace's board.
     
  16. 7 Dying Trees

    7 Dying Trees Bastard Albino Elf

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    Disadvantages:
    -You need a backup for live gigs, depending on set length you may need 3 axes at least to do a show without worrying too much
    -One string breaks and the whole lot will go out of tune, unless of course you have the trem blocked, which defeats the object
    -Less sustain. Basically the bridge is only conected to the wood of the guitar via the pivot points and the springs in the back, so you lose quite a bit of string vibration compared to hardtails
    -Restringing - this can take ages and is my least favorite part, oh, and the tuning up takes ages as well, as when you tune up one string, the others lower in pitch, but you learn to overcompensate (or under) when tuning

    Advantages:
    -Access to all those fantastic trem effects, divebombing, vibrato, screaming harmonics, etc etc.
    -Fine tuning - fine tuning the guitar is quick, and a hell of a lot easier to get exactly in tune once everything is locked down
    -Tuning stability - Although like any guitar it'll sometimes decide to go out of tune, floyds do stay in tune remarkably well if i9ts a good system, even if you abuse it

    All the guitars i currently own have floyds, well, floyd rose type bridges (I favour Ibanezes and the edge bridge) and I dont own a stop tail. Personally I prefer the feel of a floyd rose, of the bridge itsself etc. Although i do have 2 guitars with blocking systems, I'd rather have to use that than play a guitar without a trem, but thats because I am used to the feel :)

    James
     
  17. Ironbird666

    Ironbird666 Member

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    I'm kind of an oddball when it comes to a floyd rose. I love the feel of one over a tailpiece but I never ever use the damn thing for dive bombs or other shit. I always block them off. Some of you guys may think I'm a dumbass or whatever, but I just love the bridge being so close to the body of the guitar. I feel like I ahve a lot more control that way. I have a Les Paul custom also (which I love . . ) but I still prefer the way my guitars with floyds feel. Now that I think of it, the only guitar that I didn't block off is my Ibanez 7 string, just never got around to doing it hehe. I will agree that the original is the way to go because when I actually used the trem it never went out of tune or broke strings.
     
  18. Loner

    Loner In Despise

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    Makes perfect sense to me. I've been meaning to block the trem on one of my licensed Floyds for a while, but I just haven't done it yet. They do feel damn good on your picking hand.
     
  19. Katalepsy

    Katalepsy Member

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    Do you (anyone) think that it would be a good idea to buy a guitar equipped with a Floyd Rose (Licensed or otherwise), for the experience (or any other reason)? Or do you think it might be somewhat difficult to adjust to it after having a tailpiece for the last 2 and a half years?
     
  20. Class of '85

    Class of '85 metallic obsessive

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    Yes, if you play metal you'll want the option of all of your guitar's potential sounds. I played a solid-bridge for 4 years when I started and it took maybe an hour to really get used to having a tremolo, I could never go back.
     

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