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How to optimize the listening in my home studio - Exam in sound theory

Discussion in 'Backline' started by Phoncible, Nov 12, 2007.

  1. Phoncible

    Phoncible Member

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    Soon writing my exam in sound theory, and as half of it is on a self chosen subject, i was thinking about writing one on how to optimize my listening.

    I'll probably write a part about the acoustics in the room, with some analysis, and what would be optimal, and then about the different options i have to reach that goal. Any ideas on either concrete tips or reliable sources on this would be greatly appreciated.

    Ohh, and i have a pretty small room, and just got some KRK v8II's. There's a bookshelf (which i cannot move, neither can i change my listening position much) behind me which i'm thinking of noting/using as a diffusor, besides what would be optimal if i had the resources/opportunities.
     
  2. Phoncible

    Phoncible Member

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    really, no one knows anything about acoustics? :S
     
  3. LSD-Studio

    LSD-Studio HCAF crusher

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    we can't tell you anything without knowing your room, but the best resource you can get on that topic is the "master handbook of acoustics"
     
  4. Razorjack

    Razorjack Bass Behemoth

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    I have a degree in Acoustics, this is just a much more complex question than I think you realise.

    Grab the book mentioned above and that will get you started, Acoustics doesn't have any rules that work in every room. The shape/size/monitors in question/listening volume/listening angle/building material/flooring/etc all make a massive difference to the way a room sounds so you'll need to be looking at those in detail.

    Make sure you point out that you have restricted your options as part of the exercise, and don't let you lecturer think that you left anything to chance. If there are restrictions (listening position for example) make sure you explain WHY they affect your listening experience and HOW to fix this, such as the ideal listening position etc.
     
  5. Phoncible

    Phoncible Member

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    I do realize that, thats basically what my text will be about! The book is already noted, i'll se if i grab it. Its not a huge text i'm writing, barely scratching the surface, so i'm just after different methods or approaches, and resources i can use. Thanks for the help so far!
     
  6. Glenn Fricker

    Glenn Fricker Very Metal &Very Bad News

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    That explains the hemholtz resonators in your studio! :heh:
     
  7. Phoncible

    Phoncible Member

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    From what i gather hemholtz resonators are fairly easy to build and design for your exact studio. Altho i haven't tried myself (yet), i doubt i'd have space for ones big enough to make a difference.
     

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