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Live Recording question

Discussion in 'Musicians Discussion' started by King Chaos, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. King Chaos

    King Chaos Pomeo Osoponeor

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    If anyone can help me with this I'll be eternally grateful

    What equipment would be status quo for recording a band live for CD or DVD such as on Thin Lizzy's 'Live and Dangerous' album etc?

    I understand shit gets miced up and goes into the desk which will be outed to the Pa's and probably whatever hardware they'd have chosen to use to capture the sound, but I just don't know what that hardware actually is.

    Also I'm aware that since 1978 the equipment used will be much different, so if you know infomation for both modern and classic techniques I'll be even more eternally grateful.
     
  2. sumairetsu

    sumairetsu Joker's Favorite

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    Actually, with the splitter boxes, you can have the mics split so that they can be controlled by the monitor mixer, the house mixer and the recording mixer so they can all have their own controls over the sounds they need.

    For drums, you should have at least:
    Two condensor microphones for mounting over the kit to record the cymbals in stereo.
    A microphone for the kick drum that has a frequency range low enough to pick up the bass frequencies.
    You can use either dynamic or condensor microphones for recording toms, but you will have best results with a dynamic mic (i.e. Shure SM57) for recording your snare drums.
    Also, ALL drum microphones must be solidly built so that they can survive a stick hit from your drummer.

    For guitars, a dynamic microphone (i.e. the previously mentioned Shure mic) are good for recording guitar speakers.

    For basses, you should mic the speakers (2 mics will be necessary if your bassist has a biamped system), as well as run the bass guitar into a direct box and into the board.

    Finally, ALL of your mics should be designed to handle loud volume situations without distorting.
     
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  3. King Chaos

    King Chaos Pomeo Osoponeor

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    Thanks kindly for the info man. It shall be put to good use.
     

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