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multiple tracks for 1 mic

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by Where She Wept, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Where She Wept

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    a trick my friend told me about that blows my mind: recording your kick mic onto multiple tracks. i run 2 mics in my kick drum, a D112 and Sterling Audio ST55 LDC. i recorded the st55 to three separate tracks all with the same input. the kick drum is so much more present in the mix. but i dont get it tho! is it the 3 db rule? if it's just 3db louder for each track i add why cant i accomplish the same thing with gain? my kick sounds better than ever...
     
  2. koalamo

    koalamo Member

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    April fools....
     
  3. Where She Wept

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    I'm dead serious.
     
  4. GarethSE

    GarethSE New Metal Member

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    You're just making it louder.
    You drop an identical signal on top of an identical signal, all you're doing is making it louder.
     
  5. BLUElightCory

    BLUElightCory Member

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    This. Turn up the fader, same thing.
     
  6. GarethSE

    GarethSE New Metal Member

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    Yep, anything else is simply placebo.
     
  7. wutzington

    wutzington massive member

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    I guess it's a workflow thing and also makes you less afraid of turning 1 fader all the way up (everyone mixes with the eyes to some point).

    Also EQing the separate tracks differently may offer interesting results.
     
  8. John_C

    John_C formerly Skeksis268

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    The mother of all phase problems is what it'll give you.

    Actually, thinking about that. Maybe the OP is using different pres, that would create phase differences which might be doing some eq work
     
  9. wutzington

    wutzington massive member

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    On a source that doesn't vary a lot tonally (like the kick) I can picture phase fuckery working well in some circumstances. It's not like with guitars where you end up with earraping chainsaw massacre stuff. Think of push-pull eqing. I use that all the time. Isn't that the same thing?
     
  10. BLUElightCory

    BLUElightCory Member

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    He's not - he said the same input is feeding three tracks. It's just adding volume.
     
  11. ahjteam

    ahjteam Anssi Tenhunen

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    yup, only reason that makes sense to use three different inputs of the same mic track is if you are comparing different signalchains. But only use one of them at a time in a mix. Using 2-3 mics is a whole different story and totally acceptable.
     
  12. egan.

    egan. daylightdies.com

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    Everybody else has said it but all you did was make it louder.
     
  13. Where She Wept

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    yeah but its not the same as adding gain. i did it and used less compression and eq than i ever did with a kick and it sounded 10x better. i have no idea why it works differently. maybe its a summing issue, IDK. i put it out here to see if anyone else cared to experiment.
     
  14. SimonTaddio_Qc

    SimonTaddio_Qc Headbanger

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    It will not increase gain, but volume.
    It's 2 different things, although related in some way
     
  15. John_C

    John_C formerly Skeksis268

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    gain is, to be scientific, the co-efficient by which an un-amplified signal is multiplied by in order to give the amplified signal

    Seeing as we shoe-horn everything into decibel measurements, it's interchangeable with volume change

    The confusion arises when the high gain of one amplification stage causes the next stage to clip in some manner or other, such as in a guitar amp.
     
  16. TheDriller

    TheDriller Member

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    You are absolutely 100% out of your mind.

    1 + 1 = 2

    Always.

    There is no way of adding 1 + 1 and getting a "different" 2, or a 2 that looks kinda like an 8 from a side angle, or a 2 that behaves like a 3, or etc etc.

    putting the same signal on two tracks just makes it louder. It is not in any way different from doubling the volume/gain on a single track.
     
  17. LeSedna

    LeSedna Mat or Mateo

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    IIRC, 2 same signals played together should be 3dB louder. So yeah, if you claim there are absolutely no other factor in the process, all you are doing is making it louder and it has a placebo effect.

    If not, something is missing.
     
  18. LeSedna

    LeSedna Mat or Mateo

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    And when you are adding a "disto" knob on cheap amp combos, it's where all gets confusing :)
     
  19. egan.

    egan. daylightdies.com

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    I'm not going to argue with you but do a null test.
     
  20. Where She Wept

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    I'd buy that, I've been experimenting with a song, the wave forms are identical. and I've found recording to multiple tracks and duplicating 1 track to yield the same results. it makes the signal louder but to myself in a much more of a usable way. I still think there's something to be said about summing and how a DAW handles signals. if i just turn up the fader or use a plugin to add gain, i can't achieve the same results.

    so my computer can toggle 582 million transistors 3 billion times a second and never miss a digit? fuckin' sweet!

    EDIT: spell check
     

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