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Discussion in 'Shroud of Bereavement' started by dan of bereavement, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    This is a bit messy, as I just cut and pasted these from our old forum at Doom-Metal.com

    Reviews for ...OF AGES

    http://www.metalcentre.com/webzine....ng&PHPSESSID=319c6c5db4fb4d9956dfc7043adf8b2a

    Review for Split A Maddening Hue/Decent

    http://www.metalcentre.com/webzine.php?p=reviews&nr=1929&lang=eng



    ____________________

    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT
    Live Review in Detroit Premonitions 06' tour


    Shortly after walking in the door, Massachusetts’ most mournful band—SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT—took the stage. SOB has a firm grip on the “beauty in darkness” motif. The group utilized two keyboards, two female choir vocalists (Julie Beaulieu also sings while playing the keyboards), one guitarists/death vocalist, a bassist, and a drummer. The dim, orange stage lights heightened their somber mood. Band leader/death vocalist/guitarist, Dan Robinson’s vocals were remarkably pain-filled, while Julie Beulieau and Samantha Harris sang with mystical tranquility. If I were to hear their performance on a tape, I would never guess the group was without two guitarists because the low end rumbled magnificently. Robinson would later tell me the band was missing the violinist and cello player from their studio recordings. The group made the best of the talents at their disposal, and pulled off a great set consisting of material all through out the band’s career. ‘…And Tears Shall Flood The Earth,’ ‘A Fool’s Lament,’ and ‘A Rose for a Dying Muse’ were some of the highlights of the band’s set.




    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT
    Interview for Tears Of Sorrow Zine


    http://r.lipari.sites.uol.com.br/Entrevistas/shroudofbereavement.htm


    this is an older one, from I think 03'
    ________________________


    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT
    live review metal underground 05'

    http://www.metalunderground.com/news/details.cfm?newsid=12126



    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT
    Interview at DoomAltar(RIP) by Keen of the Crow's Ronnie Slater
    (This was before I had met Ronnie (Phaseinducer), you da man!


    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT


    Hail from the Altar, Dan! Thanks for taking the time out to speak with us!

    First off, the track "A Rose for a Dying Muse" is an outstanding piece of death/doom! It looks like the 30 hours that it took to record in the studio really paid off, huh?

    Yeah, it was a long journey indeed. I was very happy with the end result. I’m just glad I got the opportunity to work with Andy Happel...he was a big influence on me and my music...he gave me the confidence to go through with my dreams, and showed me that there really aren’t any boundaries in music.


    Why did the song take 30 hours to record?

    The amount of thought that went into this song was very immense...the structures..the harmonies. There were 4 violin tracks in all. With the guitars, there were 2 to 3 acoustic tracks and 3 to 4 electrics. 4 vocal tracks, drums, bass...then the mixing to get that much stuff all separate and sounding good together is quite the task...ultimately I was amazed!


    The inspiration for this song was the untimely passing of your best friend Dave, which obviously had a huge impact on you. How much of an effect did Dave's passing have on your writing in general?

    At first I tried and tried to write for him..it became my life, and no matter how hard I tried the first year I just couldn’t get in touch with those emotions. Eventually I started grieving...this was the most emotional time of my life and my music...I learned a lot about myself, musically and spiritually...the song was written in movements from the day I found out about his death, to the wake, to the funeral, to the day after and to my nightmares after that. Its all in the song, you can hear the arrangements build more and more if you really listen, every riff before the end are played together on top of each other in progression...the symphony part into the funeral march...major to minor, the sorrow I felt was devastating...I still think of him each day. I told his parents that in honor of him I would compose a song...I did and they have yet to hear it. I only hope I did him justice.


    Does most of the inspiration for your writing come from life experiences or do books and other such media inspire your work as well?

    Honestly, I don’t read much. I’m not saying I have it hard...I know there are people out there with worse lives than mine. But when I feel pain, this is how I deal with it. Music is my life...I sing about what pains me...love, loss, death...that is life ...we all die we all hurt we all love. those are true emotions...that is what inspires me. Musically, my inspirations come from Mozart and Beethoven ( I love the piano) to King Diamond, I was a huge fan, I loved the whole concept theme thing and musically I thought that he was a genius. The 3rd and the Mortal, Candlemass, Anathema... they made me want to die more times than I could ever imagine. My Dying Bride, I loved the whole violin thing... anything with emotion.


    Musically speaking, A Rose for a Dying Muse has something for everybody, from weepy keyboards to shredder style guitar solo's right down to Celtic sounding acoustic parts....How difficult was it to get all of those dynamics to transition smoothly?

    It was a natural thing for me...I love music and I love different styles. I never heard quite the right mixture of everything that I wanted to hear as a listener...so I just thought that I could create what I always wanted to hear. I always liked a climax in music, I don't think you hear that too much in metal...that is what I shoot for the most when writing. I also think that having guest musicians that don’t listen to you’re style of music helps...the solo was played by my friend Bob Beal, who was mutually best friends with Dave...at the funeral, I told him that I was going to do this song and he said he would love to be part of it...he is one of the best guitarists that I ever met. His playing added alot to the feel of the song, and I thank him for being a part of it.


    I understand that you played the guitar, keyboards, and did the vocals on A Rose for a Dying Muse. Are you a self taught or a trained musician? How long have you been playing each of these instruments?

    I started playing drums when I was 11, I am now 27. I then played guitar shortly after my brother was a guitarist, who always inspired me to play as good as him (I still think he’s better than me ha ha) I was always the guy who no one ever listened too, I was the singer in a band called Mourndrear, which out of their ashes came December Wolves...no one ever listened to me because I was the "singer" so eventually I said fuck ‘em...i’ll do it myself...I was self taught and I do everything by ear, so I guess you could say I have been playing for some years now!


    Shroud of Bereavement has been around since 1996 and seems to be moving in typical doom fashion, slooooooow. What has taken Shroud of Bereavement so long to put out an official release?

    It took many years for my skills as a musician to develop and get the confidence to step up to the plate...aside from the old demo, in the last year I have finally just began to show people what i’m doing. I have the live band now, and we are ready to do what ever we have to, to make this thing work, they are a great group of people and im very excited... aside from the message boards and the few shows we have played, we haven't come out full force yet. I want to come out, out of nowhere and hit everyone in the balls, and that is what is happening. We’re ready!


    When can we expect the Shroud of Bereavement album "Alone Beside Her" to be released, and will it be a self release or will it be put out by a label?

    Screaming Ferret has released "Rose" on a comp that will be featured in bw/bk and Metal Maniacs, I guess 20,000 copies are pressed and will be out soon...they said they would hook us up with distro in Europe once we decide what we want to do with our cd.... I paid for the whole cd so I haven't decided fully what I want to do yet...i’ll know more in a month as the cd will be done. We will hit the studio as a full band as soon as "a.b.h." is done to record the next album "The Fools Lament" so I will be looking for a label to help us on that one...


    Shroud of Bereavement has recently been playing the New England scene, how has the reaction been to the band?

    The reaction has been great, there is a big buzz on the street about us...we just played the radio last week, we got some good feed back on that... you can hear it online with pics at www.returntothepit.com. This weekend we played a good sized show and last weekend we played a festival with 18 other bands. The guy, Aaron at the radio station we played has been great to us, he spreads the word and has been following us to every show with his camera...he's a great guy and has done a lot for the scene around here.


    Dan, what would you say has been the most encouraging moment for the band and why?

    that is a hard question to answer...getting my live band together, the fans man they are really supportive, this one guy tattooed "celebrate the life that once lived" from our song "Rose" on his back... all the great stuff that everyone has been saying on the forums, that really makes us proud to be doing this. I guess there's just too many moments.


    OK Dan, thanks for giving Doom Altar the opportunity to ask you a few questions. Is there anything else you would like to say or want the people out there to know about?

    I would like to thank you for the interview, we appreciate you’re support!

    Buy our cd when it comes out! Support your local scene and support Doom in general...this form of music is very special and deserves the credit...

    Check out our site www.geocities.com/shroud_of_bereavement

    Interview by Ronnie Slater doomaltar@hotmail




    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT
    Review for "A ROSE FOR A DYING MUSE" DOOM ALTAR


    Shroud of Bereavement - A Rose For A Dying Muse

    Shroud of Bereavement describes their sound as a mixture of doom and classical. Being a fan of classical music, I was very interested and excited to listen to their song "A rose for a Dying Muse". I must say that this song went way beyond what I could have imagined or expected, and that is always a good thing. Written by Dan Robinson for a friend who had passed away, this long epic piece evokes many emotions. Fear and loneliness, sorrow and reflection, these were just a few of the emotions I was feeling while listening to this piece. Like any good piece of music, it took me a few listens before I was able to really take it all in, and with each subsequent listen, I enjoyed it more and more.

    I'm not the biggest fan of death/growling style vocals because I feel that at times it can become too monotonous. Shroud of Bereavement avoided this problem by combining female vocals with the growling. This gave some movement to the melody lines and the combination of the two contrasting vocal styles added to the haunting and dreary mood of the piece. It also allowed me to understand the lyrics which helped draw me into the music even more. Spoken word parts that sounded like excerpts from films scattered throughout the piece helped create a nice change of mood and connect the different song sections.

    The guitar playing of Dan Robinson really stands out in this piece for his use of fast runs and fills which at times reminded me of the great neo-classical guitar shredders of the 80's. An acoustic guitar and violin section near the middle of the song was without question my favorite moment. The haunting sound of the guitar and violin drew memories from me of my favorite guitarist Randy Rhoads and the "Diary of a Madman" guitar intro.

    The classical sound is created by the use of violins which pop up at various points within the piece. They are very well thought out and add the perfect grand, epic feel to this masterpiece. Other bands that often use the violin tend to only use it as a background, atmospheric type of thing. Here the violin is arranged to sound like a small ensemble. It's obvious the strings were not an afterthought but are a very important part of the song.

    The piece ends on a somber note leaving one to feel abandoned and hopeless. I almost feel like this was a movie which ended suddenly with a "to be continued..." and because of that I'm very eagerly awaiting the next chapter from Shroud of Bereavement.

    Visit the official Shroud of Bereavement website at http://www.geocities.com/shroud_of_bereavement/


    Review by Shamus Gaffney frozenintime@rcn.com
     
  2. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    Posted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 2:51 am Post subject: we got a 9 out of 10 for the new album

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT 9/10
    Alone Beside Her - Promo CD
    Until you open an envelope you are always anxious to see what you will find inside. Sometimes it is a surprise and other times you know what you receive. Anyway, before some days I received the new album from Shroud Of Bereavement which has the title "Alone Beside Her" and will be released some time this year. The band hails us from the United States and on their new album they have included six songs and almost fifty minutes of pure atmospheric, emotional doom/death metal. First of all the band has dual vocals, male which mainly move on the extreme death metal sound and ethereal female ones. Most of the songs are above ten minutes and their compositions are almost excellent with incredible song structures and amazing ideas. Of course it is doom metal but they have been open minded so they have included some modern elements in their music as well. The guitar work is remarkable and the rhythm section is very tight. Last but not least I want to say that I adored the acoustic/melodic parts of this album. I hope the band will soon find a label to release this diamond and I am really happy that I had the chance to hear it sooner. Support the doom metal and Shroud Of Bereavement.
    Official Site: www.shroud-of-bereavement.com

    Antonis Maglaras


    link here http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache...oud+of+bereavement&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=129



    Shroud Of Bereavement/Withersoul
    A Maddening Hue/Decent Split CD
    Oak Knoll

    Recently, the realm of the split cd has been confined to fill-in-the-blankcore, so this first installmwnt is the Oak Knoll Presents series came as a bit of a surprise. Withersoul and Massachusettes born Shroud Of Bereavement plow the fields of doom to varying degrees of success, giving the term "split cd" a relevance thet probably wasn't intended.
    it's a good thing that Shroud Of Bereavement came first here, or I'd likely have never made it through the end of the disc. The septet uses their 25 minutes to craft melencholic Euro-doom, shot through with threads of My Dying Bride(think Angel And The Dark River) and a little Skepticism shoved into the coffin for that funeral tone attempted by so many, but executed by far too few. The tandem female vocals of Kelly Ann Sullivan and Julie Beaulieu (also keys here) channel Ihriel of Peccatum, beginning the malicious dirge of "A Maddening Hue." When you have songs that last a quarter of an hour, you damn well better keep them interesting, and this is where SOB triumphs. Earthbound guitars lay a crushing weight upon the listener, Dan Robinson's moribound rumblings doing their damndest to hold you down as the angelic intonations of his female counterparts threaten to pull the whole thing up and through the celestial plane.
    "...And Their Tears Shall Flood The Earth" continues the atmospheric journey, the band seeming to effortlessly invoke that semi-catatonic state where you can do nothing except lie still as liquid emotion slaps against your ribcage from the inside with the force of a tidal wave. This is what doom is about and, though encased in darkness, it's clear that the music of Shroud Of Bereavement is a labor of love.
    Pity I can't say the same for Withersoul. It's not that the musicians are unskilled in their craft, but they couldn't arrange themselves out of a paper casket with a blowtourch. Strange early '90s death riffs are crammed up against grating keys, and the token female vocals don't really add anything to the mix. How can they, really, when faced with the musical side of the band veering from what should (and could) be pummeling doom to lightweight delivery with precious little of the bottom-end this music demands? I kind of feel sorry for Laura, as she has a decent voice that would compliment a band of better caliber, and a delivery similar to rob lowe os Solitude Aeturnus, where shackled to his midrange. As it is, it's almost like she was given the lyrics the day before with instructions to "make it sound pretty."
    As said, this is the true definition of a split cd. Sure the Withersoul contribution is a disappointment, but Shroud Of Bereavement makes it a worthy purchase on the strength of their material alone. [www.oak-knoll.com] -Lord Randall
    Shroud of Bereavement - …Of Ages
    Oak Knoll Productions – OKP007 – July 27th, 2005
    By Jason Jordan



    I spout off about production values often, and readers of my reviews know this. Usually I prefer my records to feature a clear, balanced production. I realize, however, that even if an album doesn’t have top-of-the-line production, inspired material may yet shine through. And so is the case with the latest installment from Shroud of Bereavement. Brandishing an hour of rare and unreleased dirges, …Of Ages – a collection of demos ranging from 1996 to 2000 – reflects the undeniable skill that these death/doom metallers flirt with consistently.

    Other than the death/doom tag, there are a bunch of terms one can apply to Daniel Robinson and crew. Either way, though, Shroud of Bereavement tackle music from several angles by combining many styles, and utilizing numerous instruments. The eight songs on …Of Ages heavily rely on synthesizers, which remind me of Summoning in both tone and pitch, but they don’t hesitate to include piano when necessary. “An Absolution of Sorrow” is an introduction entirely capable of transporting you to the darkest reaches of medieval times – the time period, not the restaurant – while Robinson’s growling mows down everything in its path. “Willowsoul” projects wailing female vocals, but takes a dive as far as production quality goes. Still, the addition of mandolin and acoustic guitar provides relief, and the faux flute is eerily haunting. Just as “Willowsoul” stole the helm and set a course for doom, “The Fools Lament” reclaims it and trounces towards death. Every tune drips with anguish, and most all of them commence with bleak keyboards, segueing later into bombastic arrangements.

    I can safely say that those who don’t like ever-present, unsubtle keyboards won’t endorse Shroud of Bereavement, though I think the synths enhance the record considerably by lending ambience, mood, and setting. There’s a lot of style mixing, so purists may shy away from this as well. Nevertheless, the ones still reading should grab …Of Ages while I sit here thirsting for a legitimate full-length.

    8/10

    Official Shroud of Bereavement Website
    Official Oak Knoll Productions Forum
    Official Oak Knoll Productions Website

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Last edited by circus_brimstone : December 13th, 2005 at 04:
    ________________________

    thanks to the awesome staff here at Doom-metal.com We have some great new reviews of both albums and the demo!

    Shroud of Bereavement


    Demo Fall 2004 (Demo) 2004 None

    Shroud of Bereavement hail from the US and play 'neo-classical doom/death metal'. In this case 'classical' means that a lot of instruments feature besides the standard metal instrumentarium, namely keyboards, female clean vocals, violin, samples, and acoustic guitar.

    That description gives away that we're dealing with another 'atmospheric' doom/death band with romantic thematics. A lot of people probably know enough by now, but a lot of others greatly enjoy the style and will want to know if Shroud of Bereavement can live up to the fairly high standards that have been set in this niche of modern doom metal.

    My answer: in the future, yes. The level of this demo is quite far above that of the previous one (Demo 2003), and it offers some interesting elements that will appeal to lovers of this style. The band mixes slow to uptempo doom/death metal in the vein of some pretty obvious inspirations with extended keyboard/acoustic interludes, samples and well sung female vocals. This range of sounds makes the music varied, and here and there a right "note" is struck. Especially the acoustic guitar/violin pieces are of a high quality. However, I feel the whole release lacks coherence and a clear direction. This was even more so on the previous demo, but it is still a problem.

    All in all, this is a very decent demo, and if the band works a little more on making sure everything fits together, they might be responsible for some quality romanic doom releases. Right now, I'm still missing a lot of chemistry, though.

    1. A Rose For A Dying Muse
    2. Alone Beside Her (live)

    Approx. 22 minutes

    Reviewed by: Oscar Strik
    ...Of Ages (CD) 2005 Oak Knoll

    After having stirred the Doomed community's silent waters with 2003's well-received 'Shroud Of Bereavement' demo, Daniel Robinson's brand of Neo-Classical Death/Doom again emerges from the depths with 2005's '...Of Ages', a compilation of unreleased material spanning the band's infancy in 1996 to its sprawling adolescence in 2000. Although not a new album in the traditionally defined sense, '...Of Ages' serves as a splendid retrospective, and the band's roots are showcased here in raw, unpolished glory.

    The songwriting present in this opus highlights Robinson's keen sense of epicness and dedication to compositional variation. From the orchestral textures that serve as a flowery bed for the competent guitars, to the angelic female vocals that seductively weave melodies gently around softer acoustic passages, this work certainly forms Shroud Of Bereavement's mission statement: the expression of tragedy through the creation of beauty. Robinson's gutteral vocals are pained and viscious, and give the songs both a sense of hopelessness and yearning. The two intertwined imbue the album with a degree of potence that most will instantly consider classic.

    This album was transferred via cassette, and Robinson's liner notes implore the listener to forgive the absence of production. Although lacking somewhat in clarity, the production actually serves '...Of Ages' quite well, shrouding(no pun intended) the album in a quaint form of esoteric mystery and charm. Great songs transcend production, and this is certainly the case here.

    Shroud Of Bereavement have evolved from Daniel Robinson's solo project to a full-fledged band since the material present on this album was created. Thankfully, the band chose to look into their past and give us this jewel. As with most precious stones, this will only increase in value and relevance over time, and should be included in the collection of discerning Doomsters everywhere.



    1. The Absolution Of Sorrow
    2. Willowsoul(Original Version)
    3. The Fool's Lament
    4. I Cry
    5. An Empty Gaze
    6. The Forever Dance
    7. Must It Be
    8. Willowsoul (Second Version)


    Approx. 58 minutes

    Reviewed by: Timothy Coleman
    Shroud Of Bereavement / Withersoul (CD) 2006 Oak Knoll

    Born of the cold, pelagic reaches of the Northeast United States, the 'Shroud Of Bereavement/Withersoul Split' is a maritime ensemble of gorgeous melancholia and convention-bending composition. Seraphic vocals permeate the atmosphere of this release, and as such, bestow this album with the perfect balance of beauty and mystery. Those with an appetite for Death/Doom with liberal splashings of gothic epicness will no doubt be glutted heavily upon the cheerless feast to be discovered within.

    Shroud of Bereavement begins the morose festivities, offering the listener two songs that threaten to overwhelm with the sheer dark grandeur of classically inspired Death/Doom. Shroud of Bereavement eschews convention with the employment of genuine stringed instruments, delegating the traditionally favored keyboard's role to one of ambience. The resulting sound is depressively baroque, and may draw comparisons to early era Theatre of Tragedy and Morgion. Such flawless orchestration is often absent from many modern releases, and is truly refreshing.

    'A Maddening Hue' is a reworked version of 'I Cry', a song intially realized in the band's formative years and included in 2005's' ...Of Ages'. This newer version is a testament to Shroud Of Bereavement's musical maturity and increased artistry. Slowly picked acoustic guitars create a droning folk-wash to set the track's tone, and is slowly joined by a seductive chorus of female voices set against an increasingly prominent assortment of strings. Death Metal vocals are soon generously employed, as are heavily distorted guitars. The slow crawl towards the song's majestic climax are both satisfying and fittingly torturous.

    Opting for a more straightfoward approach, '...And Their Tears Shall Flood The Earth' begins with a resonant piano composition before quickly falling to a chugging gothic blast of crushing guitars, strings, and a much more prominent keyboard. This is easily the more ferocious of the collective songs, and finds the guitarwork exhibiting shades of technicality alongside sharpened rhythmic sensibilities. Vocals, both male and their angelic female counterparts, seem darker and edgy. This works in harmony with the strident fluidity of the song, and will be appreciated fervently by advocates of the more extreme.

    Withersoul musically provide Shroud Of Bereavement with a nearly defectless compliment, as both bands share a few similarities in both lyrical theme and aural execution. Withersoul, however, is the more traditional of the two, describing their sound as "Monolithic Doom/Death Metal". Aggression is abundantly utilized, as well, evidenced by much faster tempos and more intricate guitarwork. Female vocals are also deployed, albeit much differently, taking a more powerful leading role while retaining a decidely organic quality. Withersoul's offering on this release is simply vigorous and pounding.

    Withersoul's first track, 'Forever, I Will Burn', is a heavily gothic whiff of furnace dross, complete with swelling diminished chording and blasting drums. An interplay of Death vocals and female singing gives this song an element not unlike that of early Theatre Of Tragedy, though the utter speed of Withersoul's relentless assault quickly obliterates a true comparison. This track offers a very clear picture of Withersoul's technical ability, and exemplifies the harsher melodic elements so prevalent in Death/Doom. From the furiously employed palm mutes to the ethereal synth strings, 'Forever, I Will Burn' is a gothic tour-de-force.

    Insidious Eastern-influenced melodies await the listener in 'Descent', Withersoul's second offering. The sheer melodic element of this track is overwhelmingly heartfelt - a prime requisite for memorable songs. Harmonized Egyptian scaling saturate this production, pausing periodically for a dark, muted rhythm. The vocal landscape of this song heavily favors the use of female oration, which blends seamlessly with the song's decidedly Gothic Metal focus. Death Metal vocals puncture the mix sporadically, as if to remind the listener an aggressive tempo change could be lurking around every corner.

    'In Emptiness', Withersoul's third and final offering, begins with an ominous blackened screech that becomes quickly assimilated into a bleak landscape of guitar and heavily prominent keyboard. This section instantly conjured memories of The Sins Of Thy Beloved, which I regard as a favorable comparison. Without warning, the track suddenly veers into a piano interlude, joined slowly by drums, guitars, and stunning female vocals. Mellow yet intensely performed, the section moves finally into a NWOBHM-esque twin guitar harmony placed nicely against a near virtuosic display of piano ability. Quite the way to end an album! Shroud Of Bereavement and Withersoul certainly make their case here as premier acts within the small but potent US Doom scene. This release certainly has something for everyone, and may well be placed in the realm of classic albums for fans of Epic Doom Metal. Both bands make a hefty statement about the their future, which seems to be a quite fruitful one. With material like this, Shroud Of Bereavement and Withersoul assure us all they're just getting started.



    Shroud Of Bereavement:
    1. A Maddening Hue
    2. And Their Tears Shall Flood The Earth

    Withersoul:
    3. Forever, I Will Burn
    4. Descent
    5. In Emptiness


    Approx. 50 minutes

    Reviewed by: Timothy Coleman
    ________________________
     
  3. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    HEATHEN CRUSADE II REVIEW JAN 07'

    Shroud of Bereavement - I'll tell you, when I'm in a darker state of mind, there are few things that can soothe me like stumbling upon a good doom/death band. If I had been really depressed when I got to this year's Heathen Crusade, I would have walked out absolutely worshipping New Englanders Shroud of Bereavement. Their heaving, hulking, painfully melodic doom would have left me blubbering on the floor like a lost child. Sadly, I was not very depressed. They were still pretty awesome, though. Imagine the wrist-slitting growl/riff marathons of early Katatonia or golden-era My Dying Bride, leavened with the symphonics of two live keyboardists and sweet female vocals, yet still utterly despondent. Novembers Doom also comes to mind, as Shroud of Bereavement is also a long-running American act who sounds European, unabashedly emotional and unafraid to speed up the tempo now and then. They closed with a ditty called "...And Then Their Tears Shall Flood the Earth," which ends in a shockingly speedy death metal coda, a bad-ass punctuation to a powerful set. I don't think I'd ever heard of them before I saw the lineup for this event, and that is a shame. I got to talk with keyboardist Mike at the bar later on. He told me he has some experimental side projects, and I dished what I know about the Illinois doom scene. Super cool guy. As was the case all weekend, not only were the band members accessible to fans, but convivial and appreciative. Hey, they had to smoke outside in the single-digit weather with the rest of us.



    http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cach...roud+of+bereavement&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=35&gl=us
    ________________________
     
  4. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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  5. circus_brimstone

    circus_brimstone Forest: Sold Out

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  6. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    Thanks for the link man, I think that was a fair review on the split. \m/
     
  7. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    pretty sweet! Thanks again bro!
     
  8. circus_brimstone

    circus_brimstone Forest: Sold Out

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    You're welcome! Thanks for sending them along. I'm sure George is enjoying having the full packaging, too. :kickass:
     
  9. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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  10. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    At Void Expression radio



    Shroud of Bereavement - Alone Beside Her (Screaming Ferret)
    After a decade of existence, New England’s own gothic/folk doom collective, Shroud of Bereavement (headed by mastermind/vocalist Dan Robinson), have released their first full-length of dreary, beautifully arranged and orchestrated metal. Filled to the brim with clean, operatic vocals, acoustic guitar and piano passages, and layer upon layer of epic keyboards, the scope of the album is extremely ambitious, almost to a fault, but the group does a great job of pulling it all off and making it look effortless. “A Rose for a Dying Muse” and “Alone Beside Her” dominate the recording, each clocking in at over ten minutes and doing an excellent job of showcasing the diverse talent of the musicians assembled here. The production is a bit thin at times, but well within the tolerance for a DIY recording, and hopefully there will be a more beefed-up production on future releases as this is an act that deserves to be heard and appreciated on a much wider scale.
     
  11. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    What's weird is no one ever mentions "Communion" (track 5 from the album) in any of these reviews. It is definitely our most complex song, and hardest to play live. The changes and layers are very suttle, but complex none-the-less, I think that is a bit of a demand on the listener on the first few listens. Funny though, it's the one that take the most time to "get" Those who give the album a whole hearted chance almost always come back and tell me, that's their favorite one, but it took them the longest to get into. I was the same way, and I wrote it. it wasn't untill way after the demos, and the studio and even after the mix that I really "got" that song, and it's still actually my favorite song on the album!
     
  12. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    WOW, This is a great, whole hearted review. Thanks to Karma_Sleeper, who ever you are!

    Written by karma_sleeper on July 22nd, 2007


    Shroud of Bereavement is a marvelous death/doom metal band masterfully incorporating classical elements into their songs with an imaginative spirit. Robinson, as director of the band’s creative effort, presents a stunning contrast of classical elements and dismal metal. The result is often a trance like spiritual effect on the listener.

    “Alone Beside Her,” while only comprised of four central tracks, is still a lengthy and diverse release which manages to maintain a coherent flow. A short intro track opens the CD with ambient keyboards sounding like church organs. This sound really makes one feel like he or she is attending a funeral. Quite fitting for the style of music and persistent lyrical themes of loss and remorse. An intermission track of similar design differs with a more pronounced synthesized, ethereal feel and sets up the following tracks beautifully.

    The songs on this album follow a fairly consistent formula. Somber openings of keyboards, synths, acoustic guitars, and violins crescendo into droning doom guitars, guttural vocals, and relentless yet paced drums. Songs are interspersed with serene moments of classical compositions and ghostly female leads which again build and blend seamlessly into more slow tempos and harsh vocals. The most enjoyable part about these songs is the transition between the lighter and heavier moments. In “A Rose for a Dying Muse,” for example, the tranquil interlude and ethereal female tones once more crescendo into the slow but aggressive riffs and beastly vocals. It’s as if the vocals, so startlingly different, weave together in some otherworldly interplay. While other symphonic/neo-classical bands have done something similar with contrasting vocals, Shroud of Bereavement manages to do it in a way which at once seems both original and compelling. At their peak, these elements of the band come together in moments entrancing union. All of this contributes to an atmosphere of extreme yet somehow elegant remorse.

    When playing this CD, it is easy to allow one’s self wander. By that, I do not mean to say that the songs lack the ability to hold interest. I mean it is so easy to get lost in them. Their length and style as previously described simply has a tendency to do this. You really have to devote your attention to each track to be able to appreciate it fully. While this is nearly a universally understood truth with music, it is especially evident with “Alone Beside Her.”

    “Alone Beside Her” quickly became one of my favorite albums. I easily fell in love with the doom metal guitar work, the contrasting vocals, and the classical elements. They all work perfectly together. The more listens I give it, the more I find to love in each song. I can only hope Shroud of Bereavement continues to refine their music and that Oak Knoll continues to find bands of similar caliber.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Shroud of Bereavement's page ~ Alone Beside Her ~ Reviews archives
     
  13. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    Found a few more reviews, and I think they are very well done.


    ...OF Ages

    ...Of Ages is a collection of demo material dating from 1997 to 2000. This material was written and primarily composed by SHROUD OF BEREAVEMENT main man and dark genius, Dan Robinson. The production values are a little rough with a mild hiss apparent throughout the album due to Robinson extracting the music from tapes. The poor production becomes unobtrusive, though, to superb songwriting, memorable melodies, and devastating doom riffs. Robinson expertly juxtaposes seductive siren-like female vocals with monstrous death vocals. Classical instrumentation such as piano notes, cello, mandolin, and acoustic guitars set a tranquil entrance or epilogue to each song that can, at their best, be quite spiritual. The combination of Cindy Murphy s vocals and Josh Sweeney s fluid acoustic guitar playing on Willowsoul is a terrific example. The said song has two versions: one with female vocals and one without; however, both versions include the remarkable acoustic passages. The pouring water on the second version and the wailing female vocals on the first are strikingly visual, making one feel as if he or she were sulking under a weeping willow in a misty swamp. Robinson s angry growls remind the listener even though he or she is in a peaceful environment there is inner turmoil.
     
  14. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    This acytually inspires me to get back to work on the new album, too bad I have no time as of late


    Winter nears, and I will be laid off and have pleanty of time to finish!
     
  15. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    from a Canadian brother on FB

    Alex Miljour
    ‎"Alone Beside Her" from Shroud Of Bereavement is a Doom Metal masterpiece. The music is astonishing. The songs "A Rose For A Dying Muse", "Alone Beside Her" and "Communion" are proof of truly talented musicianship. The lyrics are profound, melancholic, poetic and inspired. This is a true emotional Doom Metal opus that not only any Doomster should have but anyone who loves great classical music. Hail to Shroud Of Bereavement!!\m/
     
  16. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    Alex Miljour
    ‎"A Maddening Hue/Descent" from Shroud Of Bereavement/Withersoul is another true Doom Metal masterpiece. The Songs "A Maddening Hue" and "And Their Tears Shall Flood The Earth" are amazing, as well as the songs "Descent" and "In Emptiness" are truly great. This is another must have album for any Doomster. Hail to Shroud Of Bereavement/Withersoul!!\m/


    :headbang:

    Thank's alex Hails
     
  17. black_alyka

    black_alyka New Metal Member

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    "Shroud of Bereavement is a very talented death/doom metal band with neo classical influences. Amazing notes of symphony incorporated with gutural voices as well as graceful feminine voice almost angelic, aggressive riffs and amazingly beautiful sad lyrics, all together making some majestic songs like " Alone Beside Her", "A Rose For A Dying Muse", "Willowsoul", "The Forever Dance", "I cry".
    Moving easily from the bustle of guitar riffs, voices terrified of pain, to calm gentle violin and piano, drums increased by the power of sad lyrics, Shroud of Bereavement is taking me in a world where suffering and metal creates an inner necessity, somewhat pleasant to mourn, to cry, to with Dan Robinson (founder of the band). Harmony and anxiety, passion and rebellion, love and mourning, these contrasts are clearly exposed by tormented lyrics and acoustic guitars, feminine voice and gutural death metal voice, also Violins crescendo into droning doom guitars.
    Personally, I have great respect for such a musician who manage to captivate these sad moments and transform them into a musical masterpiece. Shroud of Bereavement is clearly an memorable experience, a land of contrast, a story that will make you want to hear more. I declare to Shroud of Bereavement my love and wish them success in future projects. I'm sure I will not be disappointed!"
     
  18. dan of bereavement

    dan of bereavement shroud of bereavement

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    awww, that is very sweet, and you are too kind. Thank's for sharing your great review, I am honored from your words.
     
  19. black_alyka

    black_alyka New Metal Member

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    Only the truth :) :blushing:
     

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