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Stupid Questions - and things you were afraid to ask

Discussion in 'LORD' started by pipsqeek, May 19, 2006.

  1. pipsqeek

    pipsqeek Musical Delinquent

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    Have you been hitting kids again?
     
  2. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    Why do they call it a 'wall' of water?

    I keep imagining a big barrel wave or the like, every time I've seen footage it seeps in and only rises at an acute rather than an obtuse angle.

    It should be an 'increasing slope' of water right?

    s
     
  3. Celestial-Todd

    Celestial-Todd The Incredible Bulk

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    I'm pretty certain they are referring more to the force, not the size
     
  4. Goreripper

    Goreripper Metal as fuck

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    You're kidding right? You're seriously arguing the pedantics of calling a huge surge of floodwater a "wall"? And from what I've heard, it came down the river as a huge wave 4 - 5 metres high. If that's isn't a "wall of water", such a thing doesn't exist.
     
  5. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    Every time I hear it I imagine something like this:

    [​IMG]

    Similar to the tsunami a few years back, there was no actual wall from the footage I saw, it creeped in, I'm not saying it isn't devastating but just doesn't fit the phrase.

    s
     
  6. Celestial-Todd

    Celestial-Todd The Incredible Bulk

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    Creeped in? The tsunami (and the Toowoomba flood) went though like a speeding train
     
  7. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    Yeah they were both fast but if you look at the footage the angle of the water face was very low, almost horizontal, it was more of a rising and progressing outwards rather than an actual wall/wave.

    If there was an actual wall of water like the photo above the damage would be catastrophic - each cubic metre is a tonne in weight.

    Yes I realise I'm being literal, it's an annoying trait of mine, too many years as an engineer perhaps? :lol:

    s
     
  8. Goreripper

    Goreripper Metal as fuck

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    The footage you saw on most of the news reports was the wave after it had already hit the town. As it came down the river, it was 2 -3 metres high and moving like a train. A guy in the paper said he saw a wave 3 metres high and TWO HUNDRED METRES WIDE coming toward his house.
     
  9. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    That would've been awesome to see.

    Yeah I saw the footage of cars being swept down the torrent and thought the person filming was there when it came in.

    The tsunami footage at the seaside resort a few years back just showed the sea creeping in and rising in level, a few little mulligrubber waves rolling in, it moved in fast and accumulated leading to torrents but nothing 'biblical' on the way in.

    s
     
  10. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    Not quite a stupid question, but anyway I was wondering....

    I'm thinking of doing postgraduate study. It's expensive, but I figure it's probably a good investment and that I'll come out on top in the long run.

    Any thoughts? Does anyone know of a study on the topic in Australia? A Google search hasn't yielded much yet.
     
  11. maiL huma

    maiL huma Collingwood forever

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    Um....a study on what topic exactly?
     
  12. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    What he said ^.

    I know a popular postgraduate course is an MBA but not sure whether any postgraduate course actually is a good investment. I've seen people who go on to complete masters degrees and end up no better than those without as well as people with no degrees who end up working alongside those with.

    Australia unfortunately doesn't look upon education as much as other parts of the world, the thing that matters here is experience, if you can do the job, that's what it's all about.

    Having said that if you want to do it for personal achievement (pretty much why I did it) by all means go ahead.

    s
     
  13. Shadow298

    Shadow298 UNLEASH THE GUAN

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    With some post graduate stuff it can help you get a job overseas a lot easier; such as in the USA where they generally won't let you immigrate for work unless you have a degree and work for the degree. Think the UK and some European countries have similar policies.

    It all depends what you want to study and your goals at the end.
     
  14. maiL huma

    maiL huma Collingwood forever

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    Yes, just when I read this sentence:

    I get the feeling some key words are missing.

    If you are asking generally as to whether Post-grad study is worthwhile, the answer from me a definitive yes. I'm looking to get my masters in the next 5 years and my PhD in the next 15. That's the long term plan anyway. I've been studying too long for now and am ready to work in a good-paying job for a while before I go back, but it's definitely on the cards.
     
  15. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    I was probably pretty tired when I asked the question (while killing time waiting for a 2am soccer kickoff), as I am now. Anyway, I meant whether it's worth the significant expense incurred e.g. do postgraduates get their money back in the long run through higher salaries.

    My plan is to do some studies in business or international business and make a career change. I'm weighing up my options at the moment, and figure that I have to start making moves soon before I get complacent again and stay where I am. I've got two degrees but have done no postgrad studies.
     
  16. Celestial-Todd

    Celestial-Todd The Incredible Bulk

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    My little sister just finished her Nursing post-grad and was telling me that she'll more then make the money back in a couple of years

    I can't say how certain that is for other professions though
     
  17. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    That's what I like to hear! If the massive cost of undertaking the studies is returned with interest it's certainly worth it.

    On a related note, are employers more likely to value a double masters from a uni like Deakin (where I've done my studies to date) or a single one from a more prestigious institution like Melbourne or Monash?
     
  18. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    Have you done any work anywhere? That's where the real answer lies in this country.

    Speaking for myself, they couldn't give two hoots where I studied, for me it's where I've worked and what I did there.

    Similar to being in a band, don't waste your time practising, get out there and play. When you go to audition it will be what you can do not where you studied.

    As for a postgraduate and whether the gains are worth it, no if you're working for the same company unless you're promoted to a significant position above your current one.

    If you're studying something so technical where you need rocket science knowledge for the job then yes but otherwise....

    I've found changing jobs is the best way to get good pay-rises. If you're doing work that's high in demand there will be some other company that will pay you more money

    Sorry to be so cynical but that's my experience.

    Also in some European countries where work is hard to get, the kids do double degrees to be more competitive and end up unemployed or in crap jobs unless they migrate elsewhere.

    Is there demand for work in what you're studying?

    s
     
  19. Winmar

    Winmar Pillock of society

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    Yeah I've been working full-time for 7 years, but am looking for a career change. I'd like to work in business, but being a public servant doesn't really lend itself to making the leap. There are lots of others who started down the bottom in business who have more experience in it than I do. I've got a commerce degree but haven't done anything in that field since 2003.
     
  20. StephenSLR

    StephenSLR Member

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    It doesn't matter as long as you have the degree - go for graduate jobs, there's nothing wrong with starting at the bottom, just get your foot in the door, after 6 months start to ask the bosses you want a higher position, after a year constantly ask them, then look for higher position jobs with other companies.

    Edit: Even if you get another degree, without experience you will still be starting at the bottom. I know a civil engineer and there's nothing he likes more than giving masters degree students a shovel and tell them to start digging.

    "...but I've got a masters degree!"

    "If you don't start digging, there's the door!"

    In my earlier days I've picked up a shovel myself a few times on construction sites and I'm a mechanical engineer. Sometimes it's 'all hands on deck'.

    s
     

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