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The Big Question...

Discussion in 'Bar' started by Brett - K A L I S I A, Nov 22, 2012.

  1. Brett - K A L I S I A

    Brett - K A L I S I A Dreaded Moderator

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    I asked this on Facebook as well but here's the thing.

    Should my studio lower prices to attract more bands? Because let's face it, budget is always an issue and having only maybe 1 deal out of 10 inquiries is a bit annoying.

    It will probably (and hopefully) mean more work to do but having to do it faster, so quality will inevitably drop a bit until I catch up with CLA's workflow, haha. It could also mean that the studio will have to refrain its investments in equipment (unless the amount of extra bands compensate for the loss of income with the price drop). It will definitely mean that I'll get more shitty bands to work with though (been very lucky so far) :)

    Or should the prices stay where they are and fuck it? Quality over quantity?
    Should I maybe offer "budget formulas" to bands where I say for example "Ok, I can do it in 3 days instead of 6 but it will not sound as good as a fully polished product"? I'm afraid this would devaluate my work...

    Any income or experience is more than welcomed!
     
  2. Jind

    Jind Grrrr!!! (I'm a bear)

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    I suspect given similar questions seen here in the past your going top get a lot of the "fuck it - quality over quantity" type responses, but ultimately only you can decide whats right for your business as only you know the conditions in your country, region, town and what level of competition you face/what type of potential customer base you have. While it may be worthwhile asking others in similar situations, might be better to ask the question from known quantities directly as casting a broad net causes one to have to separate the wheat from the chaff so to speak.

    Hope you figure out whats best for you.
     
  3. Brett - K A L I S I A

    Brett - K A L I S I A Dreaded Moderator

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    Indeed, but reading various opinions and experiences is very interesting and helps a lot. :)
     
  4. egan.

    egan. daylightdies.com

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    I don't know what your rates are now, but I would say "possibly." Rather than an across the board cut it makes more sense to charge less for things you know will be worth while and also charge less during dry spells. If anything, a guy in your position should use your "budget" leverage to get (more) studio credits for the big names you've worked with live.
     
  5. amarshism

    amarshism Member

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    I prefer to cultivate exclusivity
     
  6. Brett - K A L I S I A

    Brett - K A L I S I A Dreaded Moderator

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    Errr, sorry but I don't understand what you mean.
     
  7. XxSicRokerxX

    XxSicRokerxX Gabriel R.

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    Lower them, and as business picks up, raise them again.
     
  8. Sloan

    Sloan Sounds like shit!

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    When bands ask what your rate is, tell them you will cut them a deal. Little do they know that that deal is in fact your normal rate.
     
  9. LiberaScientia

    LiberaScientia Cat Dad

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    Absolute genius.
     
  10. XxSicRokerxX

    XxSicRokerxX Gabriel R.

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    Sales pitch : "Does my studio have everything you guys need to record a _(adjective i.e awesome, br00t, etc)_ EP/Album?" "Great, now if I can make it real affordable for you guys do you guys wish to use my studio (_wait for an answer, do not say anything, attain commitment from them before $$$ is negotiated_)" then say "tell you what since __(i.e. this is your first time, since you are a friend of __ etc.) I'm going to give you an awesome deal (present regular rates)"
     
  11. Clark Kent

    Clark Kent Member

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    I think it's more about marketing. I don't know if you have competition but if your work is good then just offer some "special prices" for a while and ADVERTISE. Don't lower the overall pricing since it's perhaps not good marketing.
     
  12. egan.

    egan. daylightdies.com

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    I just mean you know and have worked with big names in a non-studio capacity. I would leverage what ability you have to work for less (if necessary) to get studio opportunities from the guys you already know. If you can do it those credits will be far more valuable than working with some low budget local band.You could also approach the labels you know and let them know you are looking for work in say the next 6 months and would cut them a deal. You have good connections already so you should use them to get projects that will be more worth your while.
     
  13. Uros

    Uros Sonic Incision

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    The problem with this plan and what you must take into account is that, eventually, some members of some bands that Brett recorded and mixed will talk to each other about prices they got at Brett's studio when they were recording, and they will find out that their deals were not so 'special' at all, which can turn into negative publicity for Brett.

    What Egan suggested is a really solid piece of advice, considering the work Brett has done for some well know acts.
     
  14. Glenn Fricker

    Glenn Fricker Very Metal &Very Bad News

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    Don't join the race to the bottom. Your work is too good to be undervalued.
     
  15. colonel kurtz

    colonel kurtz Member

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    not really

    pretty common practice, really...you wouldn't believe how often stores raise the "regular" price of an item just before putting it on sale, just to give the appearance of a great deal
     
  16. Sloan

    Sloan Sounds like shit!

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    Exactly; anybody here familiar with Guitar Center?
     
  17. producerDylan

    producerDylan Member

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    Do what you need to do to build up a name, when you have a reputation around town and good skill set, don't undervalue your time. rather have slightly less work at the rite rate than have lots of work at the wrong rate - there will come a point where it wont be less work at all, but an excepted rate by people who value your sound and skill set.

    There is a quote I heard that stuck with me, I think it was mixerman something along the lines of.. "If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys" and later added, "if you get paid peanuts, you are the monkey"

    Personally I've found that when ever I do a bundle deal Im the monkey because I always get screwed buy putting a lot more hours in, and generally having the wrong kinds of clients when doing it that way. So I've stopped that and I charge an hourly rate that suits my time scale and work method and it been the best year of business I have had. Paid for each hour - no tabs, just cash for studio time. The hourly rate forces the musicians to take it more seriously - they show up on time and they come ready to rock. Bundle rate clients were always late, always underprepaired. The tighter the musician, less editing etc. When you're Andy or CLA etc you can charge a what ever rate you want, but until then you gotta keep the studio doors open.

    In South Africa all the new studios undercut each other for business and most of them cant cope, close down with in a year or so.
    In the UAE, most studios overcharge by miles, but stick around for ages (some even have a really poor product)

    Its something in between that, make sure you cover your costs, regular gear servicing, insurance and that you can live comfortably at home. Studio gig is expensive.

    If its a really talented band you want to work with - offer a "Getting to know you" deal where you charge a basic rate on one song to show them what you can do for them - just be very clear what the normal rates are. I've done the "Getting to know you" deal 3 times, and each time me and those bands did an album at full price their after. A lot of times "Budget" issues are actually confidence issues. or so I have found.

    This is just what I have found works for me. Use it, don't use it.
     
  18. Lasse Lammert

    Lasse Lammert HCAF Blitzkrieg

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    Raise them even more! (Creates more buzz around your name)
     
  19. Brett - K A L I S I A

    Brett - K A L I S I A Dreaded Moderator

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    Thank you all for your valuable inputs, very interesting read, keep it up boys :)
     
  20. Mikaël-ange

    Mikaël-ange Member

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    We talked about that already but watching some early PP episode I have an other success story to tell you.:D

    You already know who Fabian Marasciullo is, but the way he made his way is just so unusual and need big b**l...

    He worked at Hit Factory NY, had pop credibility (worked with MJ, Britney Spears)...etc. he put all that through the door, moved to Miami (way before the Miami trend because he created the trend:D) and charged much more than any local guy. He was nobody here and look where he is now...

    It's all in the attitude Brett;)
     

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