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The Books/Reading Thread

Discussion in 'GMD Social Forum' started by Matt, May 16, 2007.

  1. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    "Viciously attacked"? Yeah, Rand maybe; but you're nuts if you think that applies to Freud.

    As far as his personal echo chamber goes, that's just a poor misconception, honestly; coming from someone who has read multiple works by Freud that span his career, he's a highly self-critical and cautious theorist. Ego aside, he wasn't working in a vacuum.
     
  2. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    Someone is unfamiliar with Carl Jung and Alfred Adler...

    Self critical to insure he is hewing ever closer to his key tenet - sex.
     
  3. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    No, I'm not unfamiliar with Jung; but Freud wasn't "vicious." They disagreed, and for good reasons. Furthermore, Freud's criticism of Jung was level-headed and logical.

    I think you have a bit of a vendetta against Freud...
     
  4. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    I'm referring to interpersonal and social dealings, not Freud's books. The two had some very personal correspondence, and article like this and others paint the fallout as more than just a professional parting. This would partially explain Freud's anger, and his response to disagreement is a different thing than the validity or lack thereof of theories. However....

    The "complexities" of Freud's thought process are deceptively so - as they all lead back to the same place. His methodology was necessarily bad to protect his construct. However level-headed Freud's published criticism may have been in regards to his disagreements with Jung and Adler, research has consistently failed to vindicate Freud where he stands apart from others in the field.
     
  5. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    Freud's "method" was one of the most patient and painstaking. Psychologists today can learn a great deal from his methods.
     
  6. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    You mean throwing science to the wind in favor of subjective analysis of case studies as the source of research?

    I would agree that it appears that psychological treatment is in need of something other than pill-pushing and DSM regurgitation - but so would many leading psychologists. That doesn't mean the discipline needs to revert to subjective analysis of case studies and personal dreams as a reliable source of information.
     
  7. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    :lol: You're ridiculous dude.

    I see nothing wrong with "subjective analyses of case studies" provided they're carried out in a patient and critical manner.

    And finally, Freud was the first to look for something in dreams other than mystical secrets of the universe.

    You would just prefer to write him off entirely. Which doesn't make sense.
     
  8. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    I don't write him off entirely. Just mostly. Which is the position of everyone except the wild eyed (but occasionally likable) adherents like my first psych professor.

    I called him a broken clock - which is right twice a day, but not through any internal integrity. I also don't see anything wrong with patient and careful/critical analysis of case studies - when the analysis is applied in the limited arena from "whence it came", and when supplemented heavily by the wider body of scientific knowledge.

    Freud was handicapped by his era, relative to the modern psychotherapist. Granting him this, doesn't mean we have to accept all his wild assertions about the Mind. I would think that a historicist and a deconstructionist would appreciate this rather than rushing to the defense of unjustified generalizations.
     
  9. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    There we go. That's more respectable.

    After all, lots of theorists I like challenge Freud in many ways; but that means he's worth challenging.
     
  10. Vimana

    Vimana Member

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    I didn't really get anything out of Freud that I haven't already gotten from my readings on evopsych. I think he had some serious issues, but as for the accuracy of his theories, I can't really blame him based on the information available to him (and having neurotic tendencies, as he has actually admitted).

    I've been reading Dragons of Eden by Carl Sagan. For a book from 1977, it still holds up pretty well. He does a great job of painting the picture of the evolution of intelligence from early fish to modern humans. I plan to use this book as sort of a general framework for a more detailed account model of evolutionary psychology that I'm working on.

    I'm also going to read up on the brain afterwards to see if the information he gives on it is accurate according to the currently-available information. Still, this book is making me see the neurological aspect of evopsych as something awesome to investigate rather than a hassle. Anyone know any good books on the brain with a psychological focus? I'm not so much interested in how the lower brain keeps blood pumping as I am in things like emotion and cognition.
     
  11. Cronopio

    Cronopio Glorious Imperator

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    Currently biting into this bad boy:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    SO. FUCKING. PSYCHED.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    It does appear intriguing. Have you ever read The Haunted Mesa by Louis L'Amour?
     
  14. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    No, I haven't; I've never actually read any L'Amour. Seems to be a pretty important writer of Westerns.
     
  15. crimsonfloyd

    crimsonfloyd Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    Through The Intro and Chapter 1 and I'm already hooked. This guy gets it.
     
  16. Dak

    Dak mentat

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    The Haunted Mesa is set in the west but in a modern era (the 80s?) and is scifi.

    The Walking Drum is his best work in my opinion and it is set in the 12th century.
     
  17. unknown

    unknown fuck ftagn

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    classic. The whole 'banking' concept of education is so brilliantly simple. This was pretty much required reading for my program. Students love reading it too
     
  18. Lúthien~

    Lúthien~ New Metal Member

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    Roughly halfway through this:

    [​IMG]

    The French were definitely a revolutionary bunch! This was loaned to me last week by a friend who has endured too many of my "SLAY THE BOURGEOISIE" rants, possibly to pacify my socioeconomic-centered tirades.

    It's been an entertaining read so far.
     
  19. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    Zola will only embolden efforts to slay the bourgeoisie, I'm afraid.
     
  20. Manic Ferocity

    Manic Ferocity Active Member

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    Taking a break from The Fountainhead to begin Gardens of the Moon by Steven Erikson. Loving it so far, despite its slow pace.
     

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