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The "English is my 2nd language" Thread

Discussion in 'Bar' started by Plendakor, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. TravisW

    TravisW Member

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    As a verb, it makes much more sense to go with the "mike" spelling, particularly when various tenses are applied. "Micing" and "Miced" reads more like a mouse hunt, and "mic'd" and the like are creating uncontracted contractions out of a single word in order to work around the English language's absolutely stupid usage of the letter 'C'.
     
  2. TravisW

    TravisW Member

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    Are you talking about using second person plural to speak to individuals, or something else?
     
  3. ratsapprentice

    ratsapprentice God can gtfo

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    It may be more comfortable, however, Is there any precedent for just changing the spelling of an abbreviation just because it's slightly awkward to read? (forgive me if there are loads of obvious ones)
     
  4. TravisW

    TravisW Member

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    Pound (weight measurement) = "lb" is probably the most obvious one.

    Actually, here's an article about this very topic: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/magazine/01-onlanguage-t.html
     
  5. ratsapprentice

    ratsapprentice God can gtfo

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    "lb" is not an abbreviation of Pound.

    I remain to be convinced.
     
  6. JeffTD

    JeffTD Senhor Testiculo

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    pound = short for "pound weight," which was "libra pondo" in Latin; we dropped the pondo and adopted the lb.
     
  7. DanLights

    DanLights Santa Hat Forever

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    No, not that. In Spanish, French and German (and probably loads more, but I wouldn't have a clue) there are two ways to use the second person, the "normal" and the "polite" way, in Spanish for example "tu" is "you" when speaking to a friend, someone your age, a close relative,etc. and "usted" is the same but when speaking to people considerably older, teachers, your boss/superior, people you don't know in general, etc. Same with "du" and "Sie" in German and "tu" and "vouz" in French. And I don't like using the polite way at all, I always feel awkward using it, in Spain people almost never use it, but in Latin America it's very common, like my wife always speaks to my mother the polite way, with "usted" and calling her "Señora Mary" instead of simply "Mary", and I bypass all that shit and call my in-laws by their name and treat them as equals. I don't know much German, but I've read it's much more common to use the polite way than in Spanish, maybe some of the aushcwitzians here can help :lol:

    Yes it is. Tons of abbreviations in English use the Latin words for some reason, E.G. (Exempli gratia), A.D. (Anno Domini, year of the lord)

    Edit: Travis, I think I see what you mean about the plurals, in French it is that way, the second person plural is the same word and verbal form than "polite" second person singular, in Spanish they're different words and forms. German is halfway there, same word except for a capital letter (Sie= polite you, sie= plural you, and "her" as well) but the verbal form is different.

    P.S. my French and German knowledge is purely literary, I have little to no experience with real-life German or French, so I will gladly stand corrected if I'm wrong.
     
  8. ratsapprentice

    ratsapprentice God can gtfo

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    lb is an abbreviation of "libra" not pound.
     
  9. Erik Monsonis

    Erik Monsonis Member

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  10. BrettT

    BrettT Member

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    I'm trying to learn Spanish at the moment, and the noun gender thing drives me nuts.

    It definitely seems like it would be easier for a native English speaker to learn Spanish, German, French, etc. than vice versa. The vocabulary of English is just so huge and there are so many ways to say the same thing.
     
  11. ratsapprentice

    ratsapprentice God can gtfo

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    Oh shit, completely missed Jeff's post.
    I am not in any way trying to deny that lb means Pound :lol:
    I'm talking about it not being an abbreviation of the word Pound, not the unit itself.
    Even though you would read it as such.
     
  12. TravisW

    TravisW Member

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    Yeah - English kind has that built in as a default these days. "You" is/was technically plural. "Thou" (the informal singular form) has fallen mostly out of use because the "formal, polite" plural form became so incredibly overused.

    So, now there are all sorts of ridiculous ways of "pluralizing" the previously plural "you" in case the context doesn't make the meaning clear. "Y'all" in the southern United States, "Youse" in some places, etc. One of the funniest ones is that "Y'all" became a way of pluralizing "you", which is technically already plural, but "y'all" sometimes also gets used as a singular. So, you'll sometimes hear southern people say "all y'all" to differentiate between speaking to a single individual or a group, when "y'all" already refers to multiple individuals, as does "you".

    And that is why I stay in the North.
     
  13. TravisW

    TravisW Member

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    But it technically is an abbreviation of the word "Pound", it's just not a literally shortened version of the word itself in the sense that "Dr." consists of the first and last letters of "Doctor".

    Examples similar to "mic/mike" used in the article I posted were "bike" and "trike". And, as far as usage goes, "mic" for microphone is relatively recent compared to "mike", which apparently dates back to the 1920s. Sometimes, these things tend to shorten phonetically rather than orthographically.
     
  14. DanLights

    DanLights Santa Hat Forever

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    I always find it funny when my British coworker uses "you lot" to specify the plural second person, I prefer simply "you guys" then that y'all bullshit. And I grew up in Houston, I've had the "ain't" thing forever :lol:
     
  15. DanLights

    DanLights Santa Hat Forever

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    Rats: the abbreviation of pound is lb. it just is, as Travis said.
     
  16. Erik Monsonis

    Erik Monsonis Member

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    Isn't it cool to have this communication issues in this thread? :lol:

    BTW BretT: Not trying to be a dick here, but if English is nº1 language around it is precisely because it's utter simplicity. And about vocabulary it's totally the other way around, English is considered pretty poor vocabulary-wise compared to the same languages you compare it to. On the other hand, to speak it with perfect accent is something that only natives and few learners will ever do.

    Anyways, I'm glad there's no genders, because in German, for example, they have genders which are not coincidental with our genders, which makes it hell to learn (considering that we already have a concept of gender for inanimate objects and even ideas).
     
  17. ratsapprentice

    ratsapprentice God can gtfo

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    I have completely failed to put across the point I'm trying to make.

    I will edit this post if I can figure out how to properly convey it! :lol:

    EDIT:

    If you think of an abbreviation strictly as a truncation of one word (as mic/mike is supposed to be), with the resultant word or term still being wholly constituted by the root word or term, then lb is not an abbreviation of pound.
    I'm trying to figure out whether there is a precedent for the exchange of a letter or syllable in the resultant truncation in order for it to be more phonetically pleasing, if there is then I will accept "mike" as an acceptable alternative to "mic", however lazy the reasoning seems to be (imo, not bashing anyone :D).
     
  18. BrettT

    BrettT Member

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    Not sure what you mean by "poor," but English definitely has the largest vocabulary of any language.
     
  19. Erik Monsonis

    Erik Monsonis Member

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    Just checked it. You're right :lol:
     
  20. TravisW

    TravisW Member

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    I guess if you choose to narrowly define "abbreviation" according to one particular standard, then "lb" isn't an abbreviation for "pound", even though it is, and has been an abbreviation of "pound" for centuries.

    As for the rarity of the "k" substitution in abbreviated terms (particularly slang abbreviations), that most likely has something to do with the relative rarity of shortened English nouns that have a first syllable that ends in hard C.

    Here are a couple more examples:
    Nuclear Bomb = Nuke
    Nuclear Bombing = Nuking
    Cucumber = Cuke
     

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