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The Official Movie Thread

Discussion in 'GMD Social Forum' started by Manic Ferocity, May 4, 2007.

  1. AbelTim

    AbelTim Member

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    I've always had a love of director's that battle the studios over their visions. Sam Peckinpah is one of most notorious of this bunch.
     
  2. no country for old wainds

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    orson welles is probably the most notorious example, most of his battles weren't particularly successful sadly.
     
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  3. AbelTim

    AbelTim Member

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    I need to see more of his work. I've got Touch of Evil on blu, but I have yet to delve into it. I know Netflix have released "The Other Side Of The Wind" and the documentary of the making of it "They'll Love Me When I'm Dead".
     
  4. CiG

    CiG So Long Suckers!

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    Can't forget Seijun Suzuki either. In the early 60's Nikkatsu Productions started meddling in his films, ultimately leading to him being fired for making Branded to Kill, then he successfully sued them for wrongful dismissal which resulted in him being blacklisted for a decade.
     
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  5. AbelTim

    AbelTim Member

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    On a completely different note, "Shazam!" was a complete fumble through the dark. Very weak script. The only redeeming factor was Mark Strong as the antagonist.
     
  6. challenge_everything

    challenge_everything Active Member

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    Andrew Dominik is a massive talent who hasn't really been able to properly showcase it. Jesse James is his best I think. It's been too long since I've seen Chopper. I remembered it being good, but the dialogue has been meme-ified by bogan Aussies.
     
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  7. no country for old wainds

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    touch of evil is the best <3
     
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  8. AbelTim

    AbelTim Member

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    From what I've read about Welles, he was essentially a maverick who operated outside of the studio system pretty much his entire career. I've only seen Citizen Kane once. For a directorial debut, it is phenomenal, but I reckon his later work is what really defines him.
     
  9. Vegard Pompey

    Vegard Pompey ALLY TO GOOD, NIGHTMARE TO YOU

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    [​IMG]

    Was not expecting this to be so goddamn funny. It does such a great job being mostly grim and straight-faced and then a completely incongruous joke will just come out of nowhere like that fucking Matrix reference :lol:
     
  10. no country for old wainds

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    that's weird, i rewatched that today myself. are you actually gonna do a 2002 list?
     
  11. Blurry_Dreams

    Blurry_Dreams Active Member

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    This page of posts is making me think of Quentin Tarantino

    He doesn't make movies intended to entertain the largest possible number of people

    The target audience of a Quentin-Tarantino-directed movie is really just Quentin Tarantino
     
  12. CiG

    CiG So Long Suckers!

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    Did you just suck a pipe?
     
  13. Blurry_Dreams

    Blurry_Dreams Active Member

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    No
    Not "just"
    But yeah, I'm still awake, haven't been to sleep since the last moment I ingested crystal Meth
     
  14. Einherjar86

    Einherjar86 Active Member

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    Love this movie. I always associate it with Outpost, mainly because Kevin McKidd and Ray Stevenson were in Rome together. But they are weirdly similar movies.

    In other news, The Night House seems to be attracting some good reviews. Psyched to see this one.

     
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  15. no country for old wainds

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    that’s like the fifth time i’ve thought someone was randomly insulting me before realising they were talking to Ignored Member
     
  16. TageRyche

    TageRyche Active Member

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    I saw The Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard.

    I was reasonably entertained by this movie because of the amount of funny lines in the movie and the incredibly high body count.
    But let's be honest, the barely-if-at-all-there plot makes the first movie's plot look like high literature. Essentially, the movie is a race to see who of the three leads, Ryan Reynolds, Samuel L. Jackson and Salma Hayek, will get to say "fuck" or "motherfucker" the most in the movie. (I have no idea who topped that contest because MAN did a lot of dialogue contain at least one of those words.)

    But there was some great action sequences and Ryan Reynolds has become perfect as the put upon everyman. He and Samuel L. Jackson have amazing chemistry when they play off each other. Jackson's bug-eyed reaction to learning who Ryan's dad was in the movie was hilarious. And Salma Hayek is outrageously funny with dialogue that is 90 percent curse words in both English and Spanish.

    The best line of the movie comes from Reynolds: "She'd make a terrible mother. I wouldn't leave a Chucky doll in her care."

    So what happens in the movie? Does it matter? The Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard is not art cinema and since the filmmakers didn't really care about the plot, I didn't either. This is a highly entertaining incredibly profane, viciously funny popcorn movie that requires little thought. But it still manages to be a riot of bodies, bullets and one-liners. I gave it 7 out of 10 on IMDB for sheer entertainment value.
     
  17. CiG

    CiG So Long Suckers!

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    kUQbKz7J1blKUZIUsdRdekvae5m.jpg

    Recently been going through my Jack Thompson movies (Sunday Too Far Away, Breaker Morant, probably The Sum of Us next) and so last night I rewatched The Club. You seen this before @Slammed? It's based on a play about a failing footy club that pays a shitload of money for a Tasmanian player (a young John Howard!) who is supposed to be good, but he's a flop because he no longer enjoys the game, and as this is happening the internal politics between the coach (Thompson), the president and the board members heats up. It's funny and gritty just how a good old school Aussie flick should be.

    Mad-Max-Fury-Road-People-Eater-Sleeve.png

    Seeing John Howard running around really made me wanna rewatch Mad Max: Fury Road, so I might do that later tonight.
     
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  18. Slammed

    Slammed Active Member

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    We had to watch and read the stage play versions of The Club in my second year of secondary school. Even back then the whole VFL wants to rule the school yard was too much of a thing and because of it they thought we all had to learn about football. At the time it was strongly rumoured to be written about the Collingwood football club but they denied it could be them. As a teenager I hated the play and everything it stood for, and it went a long way to me stopping support of any kind for the VFL and now AFL. But as an adult I appreciate the film more for what it is than what it stands for. However I still can't stand the play version!
     
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  19. CiG

    CiG So Long Suckers!

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    Damn! Well maybe it's a good thing I've never seen the play then. :lol:
     
  20. Slammed

    Slammed Active Member

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    I'll be the first to admit I'm not an avid play watcher but if they'd given us the actual book to read as opposed to the play I'm sure I would have had more interest. Back then the VFL wasn't as in your face as the AFL is today but most kids still took an interest of some kind. Turning what was a weekend sport into a play was just cruel punishment! Actually come to think of it the way the players dance around now days maybe a play was well suited and the story was well ahead of it's time! :)
     
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