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The Unofficial Home Audio Thread (For Steve)

Discussion in 'Steve Smyth' started by guitarguru777, May 18, 2006.

  1. guitarguru777

    guitarguru777 Member

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    Good Guitar Tone To Tape !!!!


    The following Tutorial will help you understand how to get good guitar tones to tape using Mics aswell as Direct recrding preamps like the Pod and V-amp.

    Nowadays you can get decent tone out of running direct but noting beas Mic'ing a cab. For about $150 you can get pro quality guitar tracks with minimal effort.

    Microphones
    Nowadays with ebay and other auction sites you ccan pick up PRO QUALITY used ger for about 1/3 what you would pay retail. As most of you know the Microphone of choice for the past 20 or so years has been the Sure SM-57. This microphone was originally designed as a vocal mic to give singers a bit more presence and warmth in their vocal without alot of high end. The same type of mic EQ id what you want to go for with your guitar tracks. You want a nice smooth tone without any harsh highend or muddy lows.

    Recently the AKG 421 has been popular amoung the metal communtiy. Similar to the SM-57 the AKG 421 is more pricey abut ti does have a crisper sound. I you have the cash id say go with the 421 but the 57 will do perfectly for most senarios.

    Direct Recording Preamps
    The Line 6 Pod and The Behringer V-Amp have become very popular with guitarists pro and non-pro alike. With their amazing flexability they are perfect for demo recording or getting near professional results on a budget. Putting a mic on a cab is cheaper, but its more hassle. the Pod and Behringer have presets for Mic placement so you dont have to fumble around with a mic and a stand which is pretty conviennt if your straaped for time.

    Getting a good tone
    The 1st priority when recording your tunes is getting a good tone either direct or by micing a cab. The better the tone going into the software the less work you will have to do later on when mixing. Even the cheapest amps can get a good sound. Carcass's Heartwork was recorded using a marshall 1x12 combo for some guitar tracks along with 4x12 cabs and a 5150. So just cause an amp is small doesnt mean it cant get a good tone. Just about any amp will do if your going to mic it. Its all about the placement of the mic.

    Guitars ar a big part of your tone aswell (duh!!) the pickups type of picks and strings all attribute to our tone as well as your technique. The best advice i can give is find something that works for you. dont try to copy someon elses tone. Its nearly impossible, you can get close but not exact.

    A few things for starters that most guitarists fail to realise is there is usually more than 1 guitar track on any given song. For rythm guitars in metal and rock theres usually a minimum of 2. One panned right and one panned left. By doing this it leaves the stereo spectrum open in the center for things like bass guitar, kick drum, and snare drum. Remember to pan your guitars around in the mix till you find a good spot for them to sit.

    Use as little effects and EQ as possible. Over Eqing something will kill you mix faster than an iraqui with a machine gun. Get as much tone as you can out of the AMP before recording. If you find yourself boostin or cutting frequencies more an 2 or 3db then you know the sound going in wasnt good at all.

    EQ and Frequency Response
    This is a general guide for finding areas to EQ when mixing, remember not to OVER DO IT.

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]50hz -
    Increase to add more fullness to lowest frequency instruments like bass drums, toms, and the bass. Reduce to decrease the boominess of the bass and will increase overtones and the recognition of bass line in the mix. This is most often used on loud bass lines like rock.
    100hz -
    Increase to add a harder bass sound to lowest frequency instruments.
    Increase to add warmth to piano and horns.
    Reduce to remove boom on guitars & increase clarity.
    200hz -
    Increase to add fullness to vocals. Increase to add fullness to snare and guitar
    Reduce to decrease muddiness of vocals or mid-range instruments.
    Reduce to decrease gong sound of cymbals.
    400hz -
    Increase to add clarity to bass lines especially when speakers are at low volume.
    Reduce to decrease boxy sound of lower drums like bass drums and toms.
    800hz -
    Increase for clarity and "punch" of bass.
    Reduce to remove "cheap" sound of guitars.
    1.5Khz-
    Increase for clearer, cleaner bass.
    Reduce to remove dullness of guitars.
    3Khz -
    Increase for more attack of guitars.
    Increase for more attack on low piano parts.
    Increase for more clarity on voice.
    Increase for more attack on the snare or other drums.
    Reduce to increase breathy, soft sound on background vocals.
    Reduce to disguise out-of-tune vocals and guitars.
    5Khz -
    Increase for vocal presence.
    Increase low frequency drum attack.
    Increase attack of piano, acoustic guitar and brightness on guitars.
    Reduce to soften thin or tinny guitar
    7Khz -
    Increase to add attack to percussion instruments.
    Reduce to decrease sibilance or that annoying ssss sound on singers.
    10Khz -
    Increase to brighten vocals.
    Increase for slight brightness in acoustic guitar and piano.
    Increase for hardness on cymbals.
    Reduce also to reduce sibilance
    15Khz-
    Increase this will pretty much brighten anything, but use sparingly as hiss and other nasties are here.

    Overview
    When a Q control is available, play with it to see what widths will give you the best results.
    Remember, these are just general starting points, and by all means do not overdo it!
    It is always better to cut to achieve the results you are after.

    (thanks to my good friend at http://www.ilovemetal.co.uk/ for this invlauable info)

    Rememeber to back off on the gain. Most guys into rock and metal usually crank the gain. This is ok in a live setting but not when recording. Too much gain just adds mud to the mix. It kills the definition of in the guitars and cuts down on its dynamic response. If you find yourself reaching for the gain knob for more distortion DONT DO IT. Once ou multi track your guitars the amount of gain you want will be there. A good area to start is cutting your gain about 25% of what you normally use live. Start there and once you multi track listen to the clarity and definition

    Andy Sneaps Tips On Recording Guitars
    (also from the above mentioned website)

    [/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]-----------------------------------------------------------------------[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
    Q/ Do you use the same sound-set up for the lead parts as the rhythm tracks?
    A/ Treat the lead like a vocal, try the same compression and boost around 1k ish. I usually put a bit more mid in the leads anyway.

    Treat it like a vocal. You may need to stick a few more mids in there if you have the same sound as your rhythms. Compress around 4.1 (or maybe limit around 10.1, depends on how it sounds really) and try pulling rhythms back a db or so behind the solo and using a slight delay (400/500ms) just sat in there.
    Make sure your in the same area level wise as your main vocal also, so listen from the vocals and balance that up.

    Get the low end out of there also, filter up to 200hz, until you really start noticing it then go back a bit and maybe give it a lift around 900 and 3k, try offsetting it from the centre slightly, see if that helps


    Q/ Andy how low do you let the guitars go?
    A/ I'll usually filter from 60 hz down, what I do use alot on gtrs these days is the C4 Compressor with PT's with just the low mids compressing and compress that area between 120- 300, that really pulls the gtrs into shape and stops any low end jumping round, if you have your mac linked to internet and C4 comp, I'll gladly send you the preset.


    ...Well, you'll be struggling with the Pod, they're fine for demo's , odd overdubs etc, but you really need some speaker movement.
    [/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]I usually track gtrs 4 times, twice if we are really pushed for time, SM57 in the right place on a celestion vintage 30[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Oh and I usually use two amps, so two tracks of each, I'm digging the peavey xxx at the moment with, dare I say it ...passive pick ups. Just used it on new Arch Enemy with mikes esp V, which has a Seymour Jeff Beck. That and a 5150 and it's sounds great.

    Q/How many guitars?
    A/when Im going for old school thrash then its usually 2, other stuff 4. Sometimes we vary amps, usually same cab, mic (s) and gtr
    [/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]I'll usually use 2 different set ups (different amps) and track 2 of each, but you have to be a tight player to do this, I'll pan 2 hard left and right and 2 in slightly. Compression, I'll compress around 160, 200hz with a bandwith compressor.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]5150 settings[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]:
    amp settings are pre gain 2: 6
    bass: 7
    mid: 0
    treble: 5.5
    post gain 2: 5
    resonance: 7
    presence: 7.5
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]your in the right area, I'd maybe have a bit more of the mids in there, I'm presuming your on the lead channel there. You're probably over complicating things, especially using the 1960 cab, that's going to phase things up quite nicely (in a bad way). Try 1 Sm57 (not beta) at the centre of cone, an inch away from the grill cloth. Try this on each speaker, then compare, find your favourite speaker, then move it about an inch -if that, off centre to try and get rid of that high 10k fizz, maybe filter 60hz down and 12 k upwards out. If it's sounds great in the room, it has to be something your doing later. Nothing drastic was done to the EC gtrs in the mix. I think we used the rhythm channel though, with Tube Screamer, though that doesnt sound like the problem, as I use the lead channel also some times.

    With your gtrs filter from 60/80 hz down and also from 12 k up, see if that helps.

    Here's a 5150 mark 1 setting by Andy Sneap:

    Lead channel
    Pre 11 oclock
    Low 1 oclock ish
    Mid 9 oclock ish
    High 11.30ish
    Post 9.30, 10 oclock
    Res 2 oclock
    Pres 3 o clock
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Tube screamer
    Drive 9 oclock
    Tone 11 oclock
    Level 12 o clock
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]5150's:
    When we did the second Machine Head album, we were swearing by the early 5150 without the signature, but I've had both since, including Bill Steers old one, which I sold cause it didn't sound as good as the signature so..... I don't think there's really any difference between those, more of a tube issue there.
    The 5150 II doesn't seem as well made, seen at least 2 of these break down, and they seem a little fizzy.
    I have a Dual Rectifier thats pretty cool, we used it on Nevermore and Kreator. It's an older rack mount one, I've tried the newer one, Boogie gave us one to try out when we did Exodus, but for some reason it sounded very average. Though we were in modded Marshall land at the time so.....
    One thing I've just bought here in Germany is the Maxon OD 820 Overdrive Pro, which is their re issue tube screamer, it sounds great, very, very close to the original TS 808, and actually better than Ibanez re issue 808, we have 5 different Tube screamers here at the moment. Modded TS9, 2 Originals, Maxon and Ibanez re issue, and the Maxon stands up to the best of the originals.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Playing:
    I actually spend alot of time when tracking telling guitarists to play closer to the bridge, watch out for the squeak between that B and D chord etc.
    Alot of the time, I'll end up taping up strings that arent getting played, dampening springs on a trem, the old hairband around the headstock, every little bit helps.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Filtering:
    "I judge it by ear, how tight whoever is playing, what cab etc is being used. I find with my Marshall loaded with Celestion 30's I'm having to cut 10/12k and above because of a fizz that I don't get on the boogie cab. Same with the low end, the boogie is more controlled. I think the trick with lower tuned stuff, is to get a more aggressive mid range, to try and get the note to come through. Also with the bass, try getting the DI, run it through something like amp farm /sans amp and filter everything below 800hz-ish and above 2k-ish and mix it in underneath your main sound, see if it helps bring the bass out, especially on smaller speakers." A.S.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Muddy boogie?
    Mesa Boogie.. I picked a Dual Rect up 4 months ago.. Im still struggling with getting a decent sound out of it that doesnt get all muddy when we grind.
    Andy says "Get a tube screamer and use with gain down, tone according to taste, and level at 0. Will tighten all that muddy low end nicely. Use gain from pedal tiny bit, then use mainly amp gain."

    5150
    Q.Do bands record with the 5150 using the lead channel as their main distortion or do they use the crunch on the rhythm?
    I'm trying to get a sound similar to either Stampin' Ground or Arch Enemy, who use this amp.
    [/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Also, on the cab, where abouts does it sound best to mic it and with what mics.

    A.I find both channels work very well for the main rythm sound. The rythm channel has a slightly tighter bottom end, so I tend to use that more.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Cabs and micing:
    " I am not keen on Peavy 5150 cabs for recording purposes, and tend to use Marshall or boogie cabs with the 5150 head. For the sounds you are after, mic with a shure SM57 on axis very close to the cone (maybe an inch from the cloth, slightly off centre to the middle of the cone. Experiment to find the sweet spot. I often also use a sennheisser MD421 off axis about the same distance away - but beware of phasing if you use more than 1 mic."
    Source: http://www.davechang.co.uk/
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"Those speakers [in a 5150 cab] are actually a rip off (according to Peavey) of the Celestion Green back, so the centre of the cone is pretty small, which is good. Get a mag light, and point the 57 directly at the centre of the cone, straight on, about an inch back from the grill cloth. I usually move it about half to 3/4" off centre so the edge of the 57 is aiming at the edge of the centre of the cone. Again, trust your ears a bit, if you think the mid range is more to your liking a bit (and I mean a fraction) more off centre then go with it. Listen to the fizz in the highs, and also the cloudiness in the lows, but to me the mids are where a good tone is."

    1 cm makes a big difference on 25 or 30 wt cones because the centre is so small. You can find a nasty phasey sound pretty close to the centre so ,...after all why eq it if you dont need to, all you are doing is messing with the phase.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]You really shouldn't overlook it, 1cm back and forth from the grill gloth makes a difference as well, especially with the tightness of the low end[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Left and right can sound different, depending on how cab is wired.
    I always check every speaker as they all sound different, and if one is on its way out, it will alter the impedence.
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]one thing I have found though is the 75wt celestions work better at concert pitch and the 30's better with the lower tuning. [/FONT]



    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Low Mids
    Q. Do you guys find yourself pulling low mids out of the guitars or bass (or drums, for that matter)? I've found that you really have to watch that area if you want a clear mix, but at the same time I'm always afraid of taking too much body away from the guitars or bass.

    A. yeah, thats where you have to be careful definately, and its a fine line not to make things thin ala black metal. Bass I find has its place around 160 and those gtrs usually need compressing around there. Drums - usually with the smaller toms I'll be rolling out around 400 then by the time I'm at the bigger toms and Kick around 250.
    As far as the amount, that just depends what needs doing

    [/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Mic position
    Get a mag light, and point the 57 directly at the centre of the cone, straight on, about an inch back from the grill cloth. I usually move it about half to 3/4" off centre so the edge of the 57 is aiming at the edge of the centre of the cone. Again, trust your ears a bit, if you think the mid range is more to your liking a bit (and I mean a fraction) more off centre then go with it. Listen to the fizz in the highs, and also the cloudiness in the lows, but to me the mids are where a good tone is.

    In Closing
    Hopefully you guys now have a better grasp at how to get a good guitar tone to track. If you have questions about anything here feel free to post or ask me via email.

    Good Luck and Happy Recording
    Da Fukn Guru
    [/FONT]
     
  2. guitarguru777

    guitarguru777 Member

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    THE NOOB GUIDE TO HOME RECORDING !!!!

    Ok guys, i get alot of questions here about home studios and gear so i figured for all my family i would put together a tutorial on home recording.


    Software:

    There are many programs that offer the ability to multi-track (play and record more than one recordrd audio file back at a time.) on your home PC. Cakewalk Products, Cubase, ProTools, Audacity, Soundforge, and countless others. ProTools today is the most popular amoung the pros. The reason ProTools is so loved is its learning curve is VERY VERY good. You can have pro sounding recordings in a matter of hours without having to read through piles of manuals. The other reason is its very Software Independant. ProTools uses Cards that plug into your PC or Mac which offer a variety of things depending upon the type of card. Everything from Effects Inputs and Outputs.... the list goes on and on. It doesnt Hog Memory or CPU resources so its a very good choice.

    Now i realise most of you dont have a few thousand dollars to spend on a ProTools system, So i have a few alternatives (free and not free) that are much more affordable.

    Cakewalk makes VERY AFFORDABLE and Intuitive software for those of us on a budget but are still looking for Professional Quality. Programs like Guitar Tracks Pro, SONAR Home Studio and SONAR Home Studio XL offer affordable pricing to the home studio market. Running between $200 to $500. Cakewalk is a very affordable and smart choice.

    Steinberg's Cubase is a bit more affordable but doesnt offer the ease of use that Cakewalk does. At $149.00 Cubase SX is a good alternative for those with low end PC's. It doesnt use as many system resources as Cakewalk, but is also a bit more difficult to use and navigate.

    Audacity is a FREE Multi tracking program for PC. This is the most user friendly of the bunch but doesnt offer as many features as Sonar or Cubase. Its great for demoing songs but i would not record a full CD with it. The userinterface is SIMPLE and EFFECTIVE. It comes with simple effects like reverb and delay. But thats about it. Your very limited on the editing end with this program. But if your a n00b to recording its an AWSOME 1st step.

    Terminology:

    While learning to record on your home PC, you are going to hear alot of unfamiliar terms such as DAW, or VST, things like Q and Plugins .... dont worry. Your friend GURU is here to help you out with this.

    DAW = Digital Audio Worstation. Once you add some recording software to a standard PC, it becomes a DAW or Digital Audio Workstation, now dont think just cause you got a DAW you can start recording bands. Having a DAW and Knowing how to use one are very different. So keep that in mind


    VST = Virtual Studio Technology. It is an interface for integration of virtual effect processors and instruments into the digital audio environment. VST programs can be anything from a simple reverb to a full blows sequencer that runs on MIDI to play back samples.

    MIDI = Musical Instrument Digital Interface MIDI is a program language designed to allow multiple electronic devices to communitcate with one another. You can use MIDI to trigger samples, Change effects parameters, Switch channels on your amp, and Sync Audio between programs.

    Plugins = Basically the same as VST except this is what the program is actually called. VST is the language these PLUGINS use to communicate with the other programs in your DAW. Plugins also come in RTAS, and DXI formats. Be carefull with the programs you choose not all programs support all Plugins. (cakewalk supports VST and DXI so you have ALOT of options RTAS is usually reserved from ProTools enable Mac's)

    Q = Ok how to explain "Q" this is a bit complicated but as you learnmore about audio recording the more you will understand "Q". To put it simply "Q" is the width of a band of equalization. Parametric Equilizers allow you to choose how wide each band of the EQ is. You really have to see a Parametric EQ in action to understand .... Everyone knows what a graphic EQ is. A graphic EQ is a unit with each band (frequency) in a fixed position. That position can only be BOOSTED or SUBTRACTED from the signal. Now imagine being able to change the frequency of those bands, thats what a parametric EQ does. On the Parametric it allows you to adjust the Width of the frequecy you want to tweak. So a HIGH "Q" would be a very very WIDE band covering ALOT of frequencies. A NARROW "Q" would be targeted at possibly 1 specific FREQUENCY.... Get it ... i hope so ....lol

    What Do You Need To Get Started

    Ok so now that you have a basic knowledge of what Multi Track recording is and some of its terminology lets put it to use. To put it all to use your going to need a few things to get you on your way to Platinum Album status. Heres a list of what your going to need.

    1. A Home PC or Laptop with a LINE IN or MIC Input on the soundcard
    2. A Microphone & Stand or Direct Recording Preamp (ie Behringers V-Amp or The Line 6 Pod)
    3. Cables & Adapters- Various types to route the signal to the sound card
    4. Software
    5. Plugins
    6. A Cd Burner
    7. CD's

    With these 7 things you just about got your bases covered as to what you would need to get decent results. Other reccomendations for recording to get good sound quality are.

    1. A Mixer or Mic Preamp - To get a good strong signal going into the PC
    2. A Good soundcard with the ability to do 24/96khz Audio Recording and playback with Multiple Inputs
    3. A Direct Box - Like the Sans Amp PSA-1
    4. A Professional Quality Mic like the Samson SM57 or Audix i5 (For $99 you cant beat the i5)

    Hooking It All Up

    Ok you have the 7 items listed above and now you want to know how to record the sounds. Well theres another step before you do that. You need to know how to hook everything up.

    Lets start with the Mic or Direct Recording Preamp (DRP).

    If you are using a Microphone run the cable from the Mic to the MIC in on your soundcard, O wait ... its too BIG or the wrong type of connection what do you do ???? Grab your cable, head out to the electronics store and ask the sales associate about getting an adapter to plug it into your PC. Usually its a 1/8" size adapter usually to an XLR connector or If your using a MIC with a standard 1/4" Plug it would be a 1/4" to 1/8" Phone jack... Just ask the salesman and im sure they will know what it it you need.

    If you are using a DRP then you will run the 1st cable to your LINE IN on your sound card. If it doesnt fit use the same process as above for the proper connector.

    Ok you got your Mic or DRP plugged in, the speakers on your PC are on and the volume turned up, but you cant hear anything coming out of the PC. Why ???

    Well if your running any version of Windows it has its own Built in mixer. Its located in Control Panel on your PC. Open up Sound and Volume Controls and Make sure the MIC or LINE mute buttons are unchecked. Once you uncheck the propper one you should hear your Mic or Amp through your PC.

    Recording Your First Sounds

    Ok your all hooked up and you got sound. Now what.

    Well hopefully by now you have already installed you Recording Software. if you havent Do that Now.....i will wait ....... lol

    Ok now that its installed go through the help file 1st, or the tutorials. They are really invaluable. and as i tell everone with questions RTFM !!!! READ THE F*CKING MANUAL !!!!!

    Now that you have learned the basics of the software you have your ready to record. Below are some reccomendations for how to get good tones so your songs sound great. Keep these in mind when recording.

    Record 4 tracks of guitar for your rythm section Pan 2 Hard Left and Hard Right then Pan the other 2 about 80% left and 80% right. This will open up your stereo mix. Panning is VERY important. BEFORE REACHING FOR THE VOLUME KNOB IF YOU CANT HEAR SOMETHING TRY PANNING IT AROUND IN THE MIX!!!

    RECORD DRY !!!! NO EFFECTS EXCEPT WHA OR DISTORTION IF APPLICABLE !!!!

    IF USING SAMPLES MAKE SURE THEY ARE DRY WITH NO EFFECTS !!!

    DONT ADD EFFECTS TO EVERYTHING !!!

    USE EQ SPARINGLY. If you are boosting or cutting anything in the EQ more then 2 or 3 db You have a crappy tone going in. Re- Record your parts and change the EQ on your Amp or DRP.

    DONT CUT OUT ALL THE MIDS !!!!!! Guitar is a midrange instrument the when you cut the mids YOU ARE CUTTING VOLUME !!!!

    LET THE BASS GUITAR DO ITS JOB !!! DO NOT BOOS TTHE LOW END ON YOUR AMP. If anything CUT IT. When you think its right pull it back a little bit more. Once the bass guitar and kick drum are in the mix it will carry your low end.

    DONT USE SO MUCH DISTORTION !!!! Since you are recording 4 tracks of guitars, back off on your gain. The combination of the 4 guitars will give you all the gain you need in your mix. You want to be able to hear every note. I find that 65% of the gain i use live is more than sufficient for recording.

    PLAY TIGHT !!!! This is very important when Multi Tracking. You have to PLAY TIGHT or your mix wont sound good.

    Ok guys theres your tutorial. I want to thank Andy Sneap and everyone at the Andy Sneap UM Forum for their input in helping me to learn how to record. They have been a HUGE help in learning the tricks to getting a good mix and a good sound. Thank you all very much.

    Da Fukn Guru
     
  3. Liverslapper

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    lol, the (for steve) part on the title definalty lets me know that guru posted the thread :p:lol:
     
  4. guitarguru777

    guitarguru777 Member

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    Hot To Make Drums Beats For Recording (Midi Sequencing 101)


    Ok in this tutorial i will teach you houw to use Fruity Loops Sequencing Software to make Drum Beats.

    You can use the DEMO version of Fruity Loops for this to learn. BUY IT !!! Its a great and invaluable tool.

    Step 1. Install Fruity Loops
    Step 2. Get some samples. Samples are available in various formats. For FREE you can get SoundFonts you can get them at http://www.hammersound.net

    Step 3. Go to the directory you installed Fruity Loops in. Then go to the DATA Directory inside the data directory find the PATCHES folder. Make a new folder called SOUND FONTS. Put all your sound fonts here. If you want you can add additional folders to separate your drums from your synths and basses. Its up to you. I try to keep things broken down so when i want drums i go the the drums folder.

    From here follow the link below from the tutorial.

    http://noctumscriptum.com/tutorials/fruity...y/tutorial.html

    Soundfonts I reccomend.

    HardDrums
    Aria Bass Guitar (it has a low B for all you 7 string guys)
    Natural Sounding Bass Guitars (this one is HUGE...so be patient it only goes to a LOW D
    Cadenza Strings
    HS Strings

    Enjoy

    Da Fukn Guru
     
  5. guitarguru777

    guitarguru777 Member

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    Ok guys heres a thread i posted in another forum a few months back when people were asking about how to begin recording their stuff without having a full band.

    The advantage nowadays is that audio recording software is fairly cheap and you can get as many tracks as needed for ver little money. Ill be using Cakewalk products in the following examples and Fruity loops. Both have full demo versions available from their respective websites.

    Lets begin with Cakewalk Home Studio 4

    This $100 program does almost as much work as a full on Pro Tools rig, and you can get just as good quality if you practice. With 64 Audio tracks and unlimited MIDI tracks its the perfect program for the budding young musician looking to demo tunes or record their band.

    Some of the Key features are:

    * 64 audio tracks and unlimited MIDI tracks
    * Pristine audio quality up to 24-bit/192 kHz
    * Included instruments: Virtual Sound Canvas, Dreamstation, and Sfz
    * Integrate ReWire™ compatible applications including Project5™, Kinetic™, and Reason™
    * Add sounds from additional DXi and VSTi soft synths
    * Never miss a take again with Confidence Recording
    * Keep perfect time with a built-in audio metronome
    * Use included ACID™-format library to create backing tracks

    Using VST and DXI you can get virtually ANY SOUND IMAGINABLE, not to mention a plethora of plugin effects and EQ tools.

    Some other Noteable features are

    * Export your mix: WAV, ACID-format WAV, AVI, MIDI, MP3*, Real Audio G2, Windows Media Audio (WMA), and Windows Media Video (WMV)
    * Burn your mixes to CD with included Pyro Express CD maker

    All of this for a mere $100

    Add Image Lines Fruity Loops to this and its a great combination of software for any home recordist.

    Ok onto the the Tutorial

    Ok youll need 3 things for this.

    1. Any Cakewalk Program That Supports VST
    2. Fruity Loops VST Plugin or Fruity Loops Studio Producer Edition
    3. Sound Fonts.

    This tutorial will show you how. How to convert Midi Files Using FRUITY LOOPS 4. And Cakewalk With DXI or VST Plugins. The advantage of this is you can use the same steps to WRITE songs with Cakewalk and Fruity Loops

    1. This is the most important step. If you are using fruity loops you can only use the sounds that are IN the program. Well you can ADD sounds like sound fonts to fruity loops by making a soundfont folder in the DATA directory of the program. Go to C:/Program Files/Image Line/Fruity Loops; Data/; and make a new directory called soundfonts. Save all your soundfonts in this directory.

    2. Open Your Midi File Using Sonar.

    3. Click the DXI Button, Go to the top left button that looks like an asteric (*) and choose Fruity Loops VST or DXI

    4.Cakewalk will automatically separate each track in the Track view. So you can change the sounds, delete tracks that arent needed like guitar tracks and adjust volume.

    ::NOTE::
    Some midi files arent set up properly so you may have to edit them in the piano roll to get the right sounds you want.

    5. Go to the synth rack in cakewalk 2x click the FL Studio DXI Or VST Plugin. Then Click The Chilli Pepper looking thing This will open fruity.

    6. Go Find your sound fonts in the tool bar on the left. Scroll down to the word Soundfonts (this will not be here unless you did step 1) drag and drop the soundfont to the appropriate track. Exit Fruity Loops

    7. Edit the track if you need to

    8. Adjust the volume for each track. And midi Settings for each track. in Cakewalk. open the midi track and choose

    Output: FL Studio DXI Or VST
    Channel: 1 (you will need a different channel for each sound)
    Bank; 0:0
    Patch: Choose your sound font from the list.

    9. Open piano roll and edit whatever midi you need to edit

    10. Open a new audio track and arm it to record from your PC mixer

    11. Record the track. Export it to a WAV then convert to an MP3 and you got a KILLER sounding backing track.

    12. Enjoy your new backing track.

    Sound Fonts I Reccomend.
    Evandro Drums
    Hard Drums
    Naturally Decaying Bass Guitar ( REALLY BIG so be patient )
    Cadenza Strings.

    you can get all these Soundfonts at http://www.hammersound.net

    This is great for making MIDI backing tracks, You can also follow the same processes for recording your songs. Just program all your instruments in the Piano Roll of Home Studio and your good to go.

    From there you can do what you will. This is a Cheap and reliable way of Getting your songs recorded.

    Heres a few other tips for getting a decent guitar tone:

    If possible ALWAYS Mic the amp. Even the cheapest mics will sounds better than something recorded direct, Unless your using a POD or a V-Amp always Mic the Speaker !!!!

    Back off on the Gain !!!! - When recording guitars you dont need alot of Gain. Too much gain will result in very THIN soundsing guitars. Multi Track your guitar parts. I usually Do 4 tracks 1 Hard Right, 1 Hard left, One at 80% Left and one at 80% Right (this is how Andy Sneap (the producer) gets his amazing tones). Once you put all the guitar tracks together the gain will be there.

    Back off on the Low End - Let the bass guitar do its job along with the kick drum.

    Dont scoop the mids so much - Guitars are a Mid Range instrument, scooping out mids just takes away Volume.

    Record DRY - No effects other then Distortion or Wha if applicable.

    Tips on EQing and How to get a decent MIX:

    Use Parametric EQ on each Instrument to find its "SWEET SPOT" by applying some parametric EQ with a Tight Q you can focus on Frequencies by SWEEPING through the Audio Spectrum, when you find the frequency that sounds the best go back and Add a small bell surve around that frequency for that instrument. This is an INVALUABLE tool, Most guys of they cant hear an instrument in a mix immediately go for the volume knob DONT !!!! Use EQ to separate the instruments into their proper frequencies, BUT DONT OVER DO IT. If you find yourself bossting frequencies more then 1 or 2 DB, re record the parts or find a diffferent tone.

    You can also use the above to find OFFENDING Frequencies when recording. If there certain frequencies in the mix that make i sound bad Scoop them out with the parametric EQ using a tight Q

    use Stereo Panning - DONT RUN ALL YOUR INSTRUMENTS UP THE MIDDLE. This wil give you nothing but MUD !!!! Pan instruments around in the stereo field. This will also help Clean up the mix.

    MOST IMPORTANT !!!! GO EASY ON THE EFX !!!!!!! Most guys tend to OVER DO IT with effects. Unless its Chorus or Flange, you shouldnt need more than 25 to 40% of the effect in the mix.

    FIND GOOD DRUM SAMPLES !!!!!! Try grabbing Drum samples off your Fave CD's If theres a part where the drummer is playing alone, use that section to grab some drum sounds.

    Final EQ - After youve gotten your mix to sound good, Add some EQ, Add some frequencies above 6k to add some shimmer, and Pull frequencies in the SUB bass range, Add a Exciter or Stereo imager to slightly polish the mix.

    If you dont have STUDIO MONITOR use Regular Stereo Speaker !!!! the produce audio better then PC speakers.

    Bury your mixes and listen to them on your home or car stereo. This is INVALUABLE !!!!

    Follow these steps and youll be on your way to kicking some serious recording ass. Remember USE YOUR EARS, and take breaks often. Your ears get tired, after mixing listen to some other kind of music to retune your ears then go back and relisten to your mixes.

    Good Luck
    Da Fukn Guru
     
  6. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    Good thread man, but... what's it doing on Steve's forum?

    It seems more like something that should be stickied right atop Andy's. Can reffer all the newbie questions straight to it.
     
  7. guitarguru777

    guitarguru777 Member

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    Cause steve asked me to repost it in this thread :D

    http://www.ultimatemetal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=241275
     
  8. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    oh, cool cool. I still think something like this should get stuck on top of Andy's forum.
     
  9. Seedawakener

    Seedawakener aka Ophidian

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    The link to furity loops tutorial does not work for me. :S
     
  10. Steve Smyth

    Steve Smyth Lead Axe

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    Yeah, right on Guru! Thanks for posting this up here! Anything else you have from the "old" board, try and bring it back if you can!
    Moonlapse, though this is largely an Andy Sneap interview/point of view, there's still a lot of good stuff on here I think everyone could share in. If you have some ideas/points of view on recording/whatever, please bring it on!
    :headbang: :kickass: :Smokin:
     
  11. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    Thanks Steve. I'd say guru's library of saved stuff here is pretty comprehensive though. One thing I can think to add off the top of my head, is a pic of andy's fabled C4 compressor settings.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. in_absentia

    in_absentia Aurora Borealis

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    that guy is one freekin amazing producer.
     
  13. Steve Smyth

    Steve Smyth Lead Axe

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    Cool guys! Anyone else wants to share some ifno on here, feel free!
    I think it's good to have some different perspectives/ideas on recording!:headbang:
     
  14. Sinister Mephisto

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  15. Sinister Mephisto

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    Okay, update. Some of the stuff is kind of stupid. No earplugs to find out what speaker to use, you can't get a good digital guitar sound... blah blah blah... but it's very fun to read and there is some good stuff in there too.
     
  16. Ermz

    Ermz ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    I read that thing by slipperman a while ago. I found him to sound like a bit of an arrogant prick, but all the local engineers around here assured me that he's a very prominent world-renowned engineer, and I would have heard his albums without knowing it in the past.

    Later on down the track he goes through everything he does in a mix to get it sounding as it does. It gets worthwhile at that point.
     
  17. An Absent Friend

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  18. JBroll

    JBroll I MIX WITH PHYSICS!!!!

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    I thought Slipperman was somewhat amusing, myself. Then again, most people I meet seem to deserve being hung with their own intestines, so perhaps that explains it. I did learn quite a bit about what EQ ranges to use where from his chart, that would make most things worthwhile.

    Jeff
     
  19. megamore

    megamore Member

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    Hey Steve, I got a question for you: When you record the guitars in the studio do you play the rhythm guitars twice ( or more ) when the rhythm parts are the same or do you "copy" one rhythm guitar and use it in the rest of the song??? Hope you'll answer! Thx in advance :)
     
  20. Steve Smyth

    Steve Smyth Lead Axe

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    (Like that old commercial. some may get this)Ancient Stevie secret!:lol:
    Just kidding, Megamore!
    To be honest, I've been trying it all kinds of ways, and at this point, it's been mostly double tracking rhythms, and very little duplication. Although, that said, if you EQ and slap a little delay on the "duped" track(s), you can make it sound like you slaved for hours and hours. I'm mainly doing it the hard way, keeping it real, ya know?:lol: :headbang:
     

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