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Theory books?

Discussion in 'Backline' started by He's Dead, Jim, May 22, 2013.

  1. He's Dead, Jim

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    This isn't exactly mixing or engineering-related, but I'm trying to brush up on my music theory as it pertains to the guitar. I've been playing since I was 10 and I'm 23 now, but my knowledge of intermediate-level theory (I can obviously build chords, read music, understand the circle of 5ths, etc.) is severely lacking. I just don't really know how to write structured music that has a flow and progresses from point A to point B.

    tl;dr do you guys have any recommendations for books that provide an overview of intermediate-level music theory?
     
  2. Audiosprite

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    check out mark levine's jazz theory book :]
     
  3. chesterfieldblues

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    Complete Jazz Guitar Method by Jody Fisher, it opened many locked doors when I read those books !
     
  4. Charlie E.

    Charlie E. Member

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    Go straight to the source! Gradus ad Parnassum by Fux. Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven all read this and many more.
     
  5. ExecutiveRob

    ExecutiveRob Silent City Studio

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    Even if you don't want to play it, I'd recommend studying a little jazz theory - really opens up your mind to how formulaic composition can be.

    "Rehamonization Techniques" by Randy Felts, "The Goal Note Method" by Sheldon Berg and "Chord Chemistry" by Ted Greene are all invaluable books. Some of the Steve Khan books are great too, particularly the one on pentatonic substitutions (think it's just called Pentatonics). The ABRSM theory book is also very useful.

    They're all intermediate, but go in to some advanced principles. The Goal Note Method is very specific to jazz, but it's written in a very logical way and allows you to apply that way of thinking to other genres of music. The Ted Greene and Steve Khan books are aimed specifically towards guitarists.

    I'm a music teacher by they way! Good luck, theory is fun!

    Rob
     
  6. ballstix

    ballstix Member

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    Schoenberg's Fundamentals of Musical Composition. Sounds kinda like what you're looking for although it's probably a tad removed from guitar music. Good stuff to think about, though.
     
  7. bryan_kilco

    bryan_kilco Member

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    I have never learned theory. I wish I would have paid more attention in music class when I was younger, but at that age I really didn't care about that sort of stuff.

    Now I'm 30 and it takes me a few seconds to even tell you what single note I'm playing on the fretboard. I feel like I'm super stuck and learning some scales/modes would help me greatly, but every time I try I get frustrated and put off because it seems there's soooo much to learn.
     

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