This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.

Welcome to Our Community

Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Treponem Pal – Weird Machine

Discussion in 'Metal Reviews' started by Russell, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. Russell

    Russell __

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2001
    Messages:
    11,121
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    The starry attic
    Treponem Pal – Weird Machine
    Listenable records – POSH 101 – 24 March 2008
    by John Norby

    [​IMG]

    Despite Treponem Pal’s apparent revered status within the scene back in the day I was never really a huge fan. They cropped up in numerous magazines over the years and always seemed to be the poster boys for industrial metal before it became the more popular genre that it is today. Still, I just didn’t get it. After the 1997 release of their fourth album, the Hitman And Her-worthy Higher, the band duly split and went on to work on various other projects of their own.

    2008 sees the Frenchmen return with a new album that is actually damn good. More metal-heavy (as opposed to heavy metal) than their previous works, Weird Machine offers a very simplistic, yet very effective take on the industrial genre that’s certainly a lot better than anything I remember them having output back in their ‘glory’ days. ’Unclean’, ’Planet Crash’ and ‘Evil Angel’ are undoubtedly this album’s most rock-heavy moments, offering a driving boost throughout each that just commands headbanging attention. With a solid production perfectly complimenting the album’s heavier touches, it’s one that induces an involuntary reaction that finds the listener reaching for the volume UP button on regular occasions.

    While vocalist Marco Neves does a commendable job on this release his vocals can tend to get a little irritating in places, although there are segments on the album where his style varies just a touch to almost imitate Ian Astbury – a trait that’s most welcome here. Such examples appear on ’Sonic Life’ and ’One More Time’ – two of the album’s slowest songs – while the most recognizable comparison comes on closing track ‘Never Give Up’, a song that sounds as close The Cult rocked-up as could probably be possible. And it’s a cracking closer into the bargain.

    Mention must also go to the late Paul Raven of Swans and Prong, who sadly passed away during the recording sessions for this album. With the respected bassist and his fellow partner-in-Prong, drummer Ted Parsons collaborating on Weird Machine, Treponem Pal have managed to secure themselves an entry in the book of bands with better comeback albums than the albums they released when they were going at it hammer-and-tongs. In light of this, we’ll forgive them for the song ’Hardcore Massive Soldier’. Why should they need forgiveness? Because it’s like something off that bloody awful Dog Eat Dog album, Play Games.

    Official Treponem Pal Website
    Official Treponem Pal Myspace
    Official Listenable Records Website
     
  2. Dr. Abner Mality

    Dr. Abner Mality Primary Scare Physician

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Whoa, whoa, wasn't it Paul Raven who passed away? Unless I really missed something, Ted Parsons is still among the living...o_O
     
  3. Russell

    Russell __

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2001
    Messages:
    11,121
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    The starry attic
    Yeah, you're right, I'll pass that on to John. Cheers
     

Share This Page