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Typical garbage frequencies on my guitar tone

Discussion in 'F.O.H.' started by H-evolve, Sep 1, 2017.

  1. H-evolve

    H-evolve Member

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    I was curious if anybody who would be knowledgeable on the topic might be able to give a "scientific" explanation as to where those come from. If there isn't, well so be it. But I was curious.

    Let me explain:

    When sweeping around for undesired frequencies on my guitar tone, I always find the garbage to be at the exact same 3 areas. Like everybody, I always have the 4 kHz annoying fizz. But I also always have too much fizz around 6 kHz and I am always finding some harmonic thingy (probably not the right term, but that's all that came to mind) at 2 kHz. So, 2 kHz, 4 kHz and 6 kHz.

    Now the 6 kHz seem to be gear related in my case, cause it's a lot more annoying on my ENGL Savage + ENGL XXL + SM57 chain, than say on a Dual Rectifier + Mesa OS + SM57. It's still there on the Mesa chain, but significantly less annoying.

    So ya, if anybody could educate me on this, I'd be more than happy. And if there isn't any clear rule on this, well I'll still consider myself more educated on the matter!

    Thanks
     
  2. Old Man Doom

    Old Man Doom Member

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    Interesting. I have the exact same 3 problem areas. The 6k is often the worst for my ears (using a Friedman amp sim).
     
  3. MrBongo

    MrBongo idiot at work

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    there´s usually more than just one speaker resonance in distorted guitar recordings. Notch ´em out and be good.
    They are always present, just at different frequencies for each combination of speaker and mic position.

    Also, be sure that it´s not your monitors, they can have speaker resonance as well !
    When it´s always the same freqs, even with recordings from other people, chances are it´s your monitors and surroundings
     
  4. H-evolve

    H-evolve Member

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    For some reason I forgot I posted this, though it is something that has been bugging me!!!

    Thanks for the replies. I can say that it's not the monitors or something. I can hear the same problematic areas on multiple devices (headset, speakers, etc.)

    I will continue running tests, but I feel I even have those problematic areas even when using plugins, instead of mic'd up speaker.

    Perhaps my pick ups? Or interface?
     
  5. newamerikangospel

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    Your ear(s) is unique to you. I am super sensitive to high end, having my mixes be too dark until I set my tweeter to -3db. Maybe this is you.
     
  6. bryan_kilco

    bryan_kilco Member

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    At least you can identify your problem areas. When I sweep around for annoying frequencies, it just seems EVERY thing sounds bad. I have a very hard time picking out what’s good/bad.
     
  7. H-evolve

    H-evolve Member

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    I don't think I'm that great at doing it, but...

    I listened to a Joey Sturgis video, and the way he explained it was helping. If I rephrase how he explained it: As you scan for "noise", you sweep the frequency spectrum with a narrow, high gain EQ bell. Obviously, everything will sound annoying with such boosted frequencies, but you must listen for "constant noises". That is: when your bell is at a certain position on the spectrum, if you hear a constant fizz, noise, whatever, that doesn't seem to change at all with what the guitar is playing, then you know it's just unwanted noise. Even boosted like crazy, the normal behavior would be to still somewhat respect the guitar playing (pick attack, etc.). A constant, never changing fizz, is a sign of noise.

    But on the other hand, I try to also use my own judgment. Sometimes I find that some tones are a bit annoying in a relatively narrow area (for instance 6 kHz). There isn't a clear noise to be removed, I just don't like what I hear there, so I do a gentle (-2dB max) narrow cut.
     
  8. allanqa

    allanqa Member

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    Even great guitar tones have annoying frequencies, you have to cut narrow or sometimes wide gentle bells in some cases
     

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