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Vocalist development?

Discussion in 'Andy Sneap' started by Thared33, Aug 22, 2009.

  1. Thared33

    Thared33 Member

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    If you've got a band going with no vocalist, you may need to just do vocals yourself. That's what it's coming to for me. I wanted to ask the vocalists here what the process is like and how long these things take if you're musically experienced, but not with vocals. I'm talking mainly clean vocals. Not sure if this is worth a shot or not. I know the 'you're never too old' thing applies here but I was just wondering what people had to say about it.

    Hopefully I can be a monster and do well early on.
     
  2. GarethSE

    GarethSE New Metal Member

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    It's taken me about 2 and a half years to get to the level I'm at now. it's been blood sweat and tears because I had no-one to teach me. If you have a friend who's a good vocalist who can help you out in anyway and ease you into the main technique a bit easier, then do it, because when I learnt how to do it, I had no one to show me and help me out, so it was 3 weeks of just literally screaming during practice until I figured out what part of my vocal chords made what sound, then it's been 2 years of refining my technique and style through a combination of copying many different vocalists, then refining that into my own unique style. Now I'd be pretty quick to say I can nail a variety of styles of scream/growl. Once you've learnt the basics, it's all down to your own personal desire to expand your vocal repertoire.
     
  3. Thared33

    Thared33 Member

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    Thanks for the fast reply. I'm talking mainly clean vocals but definitely, I'll try growls as well. I think if I practice I'll do ok, just don't want this to take 15 years before I'm decent.
     
  4. Forceps

    Forceps John - Spiralcove

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    I made a huge step forward after taking some vocal lessons. It's important to know how to use breathing techniques and breath support, so you don't fuck up your voice... The first few gigs we did, I was completely wasted afterwards and had a sore throat the day after. But after even a few lessons I was able to sing much longer and no sore throat at all!
     
  5. GarethSE

    GarethSE New Metal Member

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    See when it comes to gigs, it's definately wrong of me to, but I embrace the sore throat
    i felt dissapointed with myself if i wasnt at the point of collapse after a couple of songs
    if we had multiple gigs in a shorter time frame i just eased off on it but i always gave it 200% every single time if i could afford to.
    the day after, id just shut up and rest up and im doing just fine :)
     
  6. Chris_P_Critter

    Chris_P_Critter Freeze Tag Assassin

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    You know, this is the one area that lessons can really be helpful. It's not like a stringed instrument where watching youtube videos and online tuitorials will help. You need to FEEL the singing, and it's tough without a first hand perspective if you're not certain where to start.

    Lessons man - even if it's only a few of them just to get basic breathing, vibrato, etc. down without shredding your throat - will definitely help man. Good luck!
     
  7. GarethSE

    GarethSE New Metal Member

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    id agree with this 1000000%
    seriously, i wouldnt wish those 3 weeks where i learnt how to scream on anyone
    it was agony.
     
  8. Chris_P_Critter

    Chris_P_Critter Freeze Tag Assassin

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    Seriously man!

    Even with clean singing, unless you learn the right techniques, you're probably going to end up using bad technique, and probably strain yourself pretty badly which ultimately will just be a set back for you.
     
  9. Suicide_As_Alibi

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    It shouldn't take more than one session to learn diaphragmatic breathing, and in pop singing (which metal is - anything non-classical/operatic essentially) you shouldn't be taught vibrato; it should be a natural side-effect of resonant tone. If it does come up in lessons, it should be way down the line, after you've got past abducting your chords and smoothing register breaks etc.

    Dodo - you're kinda missing the point. If your technique is good, you should be able to give 110% without getting a sore throat. Opera is far more stressful on the voice than any popular clean style (assuming good technique), and you'd be hard pushed to say they aren't giving their all - but they can sing for 3+ hours and come off stage without having to whisper or be mute for the next 24 hours.

    Steve
     
  10. akarawd

    akarawd Member

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    +1

    2 things I'd like to add : sleep and plenty of room temperature water.

    Once you've managed your abdominal breathing, you'll be a able to handle a full breath. Although beneficial it may be, don't get too caught up mimicking what other singers do, make sure you sing a tune with your voice too.

    Additionally, most men have 3 - 4.5 octaves range, you just have to work on it - trust me, I used to be the guy who had 3 miserable, out of tune notes and after years of effort I can sing along most of my favorite tunes (including Judas Priest/King Diamond/Queensryche stuff).

    Regards,
    akarawd
     
  11. Nebulous

    Nebulous Daniel

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    If you can't find a good teacher in your area, I would recommend the book "Singing for dummies". It really helps to teach your body how to breathe properly when singing.
    I picked it up earlier this year and I can now sing some easy things, even do some backing and the odd lead vocal in my band. It definately helps get through the fisrt stage of learning, and if you practice it with the intention of being a lead vocalist I think it will really help you.
    Along with that, start with learning things within your range and work slowly towards the harder songs. Eg, If like me your natural tone is more akin to the lowest notes of an A440 tuned guitar, don't start with vocalists like those from Lost Horison, Edguy, Iron Maiden, etc.
    Find a vocalist to sing to that is very similar untill you're comfortable with your teachnique.
     

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