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Why is there a lack of baritone guitars for the metal world?

Discussion in 'Backline' started by mick thompson, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. mick thompson

    mick thompson AKA: Ross Canpolat! SM!

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    right, i've never played one so maybe someone can answer this. Why is there a lack of baritone guitars out there especially for metal?

    example chris amott's caparison is made for metal yet its a 25 scale and most guitars out there are 25 scale that are used for metal.

    if a baritone naturally produces a low crucifying sound why are they not produced for metal players?

    like.. okay, there are baritones but all the ones i've seen are fucking ugly!

    just wondering!
     
  2. FIXXXER

    FIXXXER ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    i think that most guitar players feel a little bit uncomfortable with a barritone neck...
     
  3. mick thompson

    mick thompson AKA: Ross Canpolat! SM!

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    its just longer is it? or correct me if im wrong

    that shouldn't be a reason should it? - people can swap between using gibson's and 24 fret's all the time - thats what i do

    my cort & bc rich are both 24 fret
    my gibson and jackson are both 21 and the gibson is a very small guitar

    i would gladly welcome more baritones - im a big fucking guy, im 6 foot 4 and im built like a tank - thats why i dont like to use my gibson because it looks so small beside me (lovely guitar though) if i could find a pretty looking baritone i would welcome it because it would suit to my body height and build more and it would add to my evil crushing tone
     
  4. FIXXXER

    FIXXXER ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    looking at some pictures i think that the difference is bigger...more like a 21fret guitar neck and a bass neck!:D
     
  5. Metaltastic

    Metaltastic Member

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    Baritone necks are definitely longer, usually between 26 and 28" (but most super-strat guitars are 25.5", such as Chris Amott's Caparison; 25" necks are less common, the only companies I know of who consistently use them are PRS and Carvin) A longer scale length definitely can be advantageous for comfort and intonation (more tension and thus tuning stability without having to use humongous strings), though it also changes the tone somewhat, and I'm on the fence as to whether it's a desirable change (my impression is it tightens everything up, but sometimes a bit too much...really want to pick up a guitar with a long neck, probably a 7-string because of availability/price, to mess around with)
     
  6. mick thompson

    mick thompson AKA: Ross Canpolat! SM!

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    i've tried 7 strings in the past but i just cant get my head around the extra string. i've been playing almost 10 years now so i've become accustomed to a 6 string. i understand what your saying about a baritones stability & tightness, i would have thought in many cases especially for metal players tightness is one of the key fundamentals. (at least it is for me) when you have a kick going at a solid 200bpm a sloppy guitar riff can destroy the track

    i suppose the only way im going to find out is to go try out one. i dont like the fender baritones or the prs ones cosmetically but ill try them out for tone styling etc. im still hoping for rob flynn's to be released by ESP - his one was a custom baritone if i remember correctly
     
  7. Loren Littlejohn

    Loren Littlejohn Lover of all boobage.

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    These are ugly?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. AdamWathan

    AdamWathan Member

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    The current baritone C1 that Schecter makes has a fucking horrid 12th fret inlay, the pic you posted is discontinued.

    The only baritone I've seen that I like is the LTD MHB-400 but those are discontinued now too... I really want a baritone for the studio but like the OP I can't find a single affordable baritone that doesn't look like ass!
     
  9. 006

    006 Member

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    For anyone looking for a baritone, no joke the PRS SE Mushok is a great deal. 27" neck I think, but the quality of the instrument is beyond it's price tag.
     
  10. Metaltastic

    Metaltastic Member

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    28" actually, a bit much :erk:
     
  11. 006

    006 Member

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    Oh whoah, 28"... the Agile 8-string I had was 28.38723890273402837230-something" scale, it wasn't too bad but the lower riffage was annoying sometimes, things being quite a bit of a stretch compared to what I was used to. One thing I can say though is longer scales = incredible sustain, well usually anyway. The 8-string was like a friggin piano, everyone who played it while I had it made a comment on the sustain.
     
  12. muckypup1

    muckypup1 Sinister Haven \m/

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    ^^^ Was the 8 string hard to play dude? The neck's on those monsters always look huge!
     
  13. Jormyn

    Jormyn Member

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    I managed to find one of these a few years ago:

    [​IMG]

    The inlay took a bit of getting used to, but damn... still makes me drool.
     
  14. Josh Burgess

    Josh Burgess Member

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    I don't like them because they're uncomfortable to play. Can I play on them? Sure. Do I find it easier and more comfortable to shred on a 25.5" guitar? Definitely. I think people who are big into lead playing and shred guitar always want to use what they find to be the most comfortable and easy to play... so that they don't have to fight the guitar at all.

    Also, the longer the scale length, the more thin and bright the tone becomes. Some people just don't like the sound of them.... particularly on the higher strings.
     
  15. 006

    006 Member

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    muckypup: No, actually the neck isn't as bad as one would think at all. It was easy to get my hand around and use. It was just the fret spacing due to the scale length, that is all.
     
  16. SocialNumb

    SocialNumb Damn Christians!

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    8 Strings :zombie: I have a 6 string Agile baritone (you probably know which ;))

    Yes, sustain for days. Kinda hard to play or I sucks cock. Still not used to those monster strings and stretches. It really works out my hand. :erk:

    OT, How low a string gauge can I get on this thing without totally getting shit? I'm thinking I've gave it enough time and I'm at a stand still. I think it's because the string gauge.
     
  17. Jind

    Jind Grrrr!!! (I'm a bear)

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    I'm sure if you went back to the manufacturers with the question "why so few baritone guitars?" the answer would be simple "lack of sales". While the idea may have merit, in actuality most of us would stick with what we have. Baritone guitars have been available for a long time, but they are still just a niche item. Sales drive design and production - it's that simple.
     
  18. mick thompson

    mick thompson AKA: Ross Canpolat! SM!

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    oh fuck - i didnt know schecter made baritones - fair enough then - i think my next buy is a c1.

    im not after a lead guitar, i prefer a crushing riff to a melodic solo any day and if a baritone will suit my image and help me crush more then its a win for me! for my lead work i have my gibson, jackson, cort and bc rich
     
  19. Demoniac_Industries

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    As for the difference in playing, it's a different thing to having extra frets. As opposed to just adding them onto the end, all of the rest of the frets are bigger to compensate for the longer scale length, to keep the intonation correct, hence why a lot of people find them uncomfortable; longer stretches and so on. Still, the sound is amazingly good :)
     
  20. ahjteam

    ahjteam Anssi Tenhunen

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    Didn't Korn have a signature baritone guitar? K7 or something like that?
     

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